Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,818 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Rider
Lowest review score: 0 The Bonfire of the Vanities
Score distribution:
6818 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a reason this movie was a critical and popular success in Brazil: It resonates. And despite the beauty of the weathered local faces this movie celebrates, it resonates for anyone, anywhere, watching it. “What do they call the inhabitants of Bacurau?” a young boy is asked. “People!” he responds. Just so.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film’s greatest strength is its lead actress, Haley Bennett, who’s on camera for almost the entire running time and who portrays a desperately lonely woman’s journey through self-destruction toward something like sanity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie gets credit for showing the struggles he and millions of others with similar disorders live with on a daily basis. They’re not pretty, but — aside from Emma — they’re real.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    George Nolfi directs with a TV-movie straightforwardness and at two hours the film is overlong, but the story is an eye-opener and the central performances are terrific.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s pretty great — not quite “Fargo” with lobsters but close enough, and about as good as regional filmmaking gets. Filmed in Harpswell, Maine and environs — the cobwork of Bailey Island Bridge curves through one scene — Blow the Man Down delves cleverly and suspensefully beneath the surface of a small, well-appointed fishing town in winter. There are bodies and there is blood. There are also a lot of quietly furious women.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s of a piece with shaggy recent westerns like “The Sisters Brothers” and “Slow West,” and it owes a debt of gratitude as well to the work of Robert Altman, especially the classic “McCabe and Mrs. Miller.” (That First Cow marks the final appearance of Altman regular and “McCabe” costar Rene Auberjonois is a lovely poetic touch.)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A clever, gory, often very funny piece of genre junk — a B+ movie — that carries a hidden warning: When we turn other people into cartoons of our worst fears, the only thing left to do is kill each other.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Way Back is the first real Sad Ben film. It’s earnest and old-fashioned and sturdily made, and I wish that were enough to make it good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A scattershot satire about the vulgar, privileged one percent, British division, that’s almost as funny as it is furious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wendy feels like a holding maneuver — a way for a gifted young storyteller to keep one foot in the innocence of childhood while figuring what he’s really going to do next.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is almost wholly lacking in the Pixar touch — that extra oomph of wit, invention, creative craziness, darkness, depth of feeling, whatever, that makes the company’s products among the very few items manufactured for children in our sold-out popular culture to not feel like products.
  1. Robertson’s ex-wife, Dominique. Her thoughtful presence is a very welcome departure from the standard rock-doc formula. She provides the kind of reality check — an under-the-influence Manuel almost got her killed when he totaled her Mustang, with her in the passenger seat — rarely found in such films. In that sense, it isn’t just the Band that was different but “Once Were Brothers” is, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s still a clever-clever cartoon version of the book, with broad physical business in place of wit and Austen’s insights on gender roles and social hypocrisy tossed overboard. But I guess if the Empire waists are high enough and the male leads strappingly repressed, nothing else really matters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is floating into a fierce war of wills between Iya and Masha, one in which their locked stares gradually seem to become an eerie, eternal bond of sisterhood. They can’t look away. Neither may you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a sly, twisty little chiller, not ashamed of its B-movie bona fides and better for it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Leave it to James to sum up a legendary, culture-altering talent: “She turned her lack of self-awareness into a triumph.” Both sides of that coin live on in our modern culture, and Kael’s voice fills every self-satisfied corner of the Internet. Two decades after her death, she’s still the ghost in the machine.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cancer dramas are not uncommon; what lifts Ordinary Love just enough out of the ordinary is its concern with how a married couple survives the ordeal. Intimate, unsparing, and attuned to the micro-nuances of a longtime relationship, it is made special by the two actors at its center, both out-size talents who here relish the opportunity to play close and draw from life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Traitor is a coolly epic appraisal of a country’s struggle with its dark side rather than a mobbed-up melodrama. If it’s “Godfather” clichés you want, there’s always “The Godfather.”
  2. The documentary loses a bit when Dagg returns home, and an alarmingly perky score doesn’t help. Late in life, after her tenure struggles, she published a new edition of her dissertation and found herself rediscovered.
  3. When the best thing about a movie is the title, that’s never a good sign. It’s all downhill from there? Exactly, and that’s the case with Downhill.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Céline Sciamma’s extraordinary fourth feature and a movie of body, heart, and mind.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Assistant is a stealth bomb of a movie: It barely makes a noise but it leaves a crater in your heart.
  4. The title might trumpet Harley Quinn’s emancipation, but she again feels like a character trapped in a movie that’s mediocre at best.
  5. It’s a diverting if slightly undercooked throwback that could offer more genuine intrigue, but that’s still worth it to see the cast gamely chuck out the window manners and vanity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Clemency observes its characters with a steady, unmodulated pace and a minimum of frills.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s rough and observant, stacked with finely etched characters whose sympathies keep shifting along with ours.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    And while I understand Downey wanting to make a movie for his kids, the world might be better served if, at long last, he made one for himself.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An acceptable creature feature at best and a waterlogged “Alien” at worst, Underwater sneaks into town as a true January release: a shelf-sitting production that 20th Century Fox’s new owner, Disney, is putting outside the store like a loaf of stale bread. It’s there if you want it, and you could chew on worse.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As true-story dramas about innocent men on death row go, Just Mercy is just above average. I still hope it reaches the widest audience possible. To quote a statistic cited in the film, for every nine prisoners executed in this country, one is found to have been wrongfully convicted. That’s a number to shame a nation.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s the lack of depth that ultimately may keep you from committing to 1917 or even respecting it — the movie’s sense that war is simply something that happens to people rather than being caused by them. Don’t forget that World War I was once called The War to End All Wars. It wasn’t and according to the headlines it still isn’t, but this movie never stops running to bother ask why.

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