Sundance Selects | Release Date: December 2, 2016
6.9
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 45 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
33
Mixed:
10
Negative:
2
Watch Now
Buy On
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
5
netflicDec 12, 2016
It is a French movie about a woman in her sixties, a philosophy teacher, who suddenly realizes that she is free from all usual responsibilities: kids grew up and left home, her husband found a younger woman and left as well, elderly and sickIt is a French movie about a woman in her sixties, a philosophy teacher, who suddenly realizes that she is free from all usual responsibilities: kids grew up and left home, her husband found a younger woman and left as well, elderly and sick mother passed away. What to do with all that freedom? You spent all your life building a family, and now it's all gone...

Isabelle Huppert stars here as main protagonist Nathalie. She is a good actress and she proved it again. But emotionally that movie did not not move me (pan intended).

I would call this film remarkably unremarkable.
Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
All this user's reviews
9
krimokrimoDec 2, 2016
A very subtle film with a very subtle performance by Isabelle Huppert. Its basically a coming of age tale about a woman in her sixties and its directed gracefully by Mia Hansen-Love. The cinematography of the film is warm and beautiful. I loved it.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
VonSeuxJan 13, 2017
It's a slow movie, with superb acting, lots of tension and a heavy dose of real life. Mia Hansen Love keeps offering us deeply moving and mature films, I'm glad we have a director we can blindly go into movie and feel ecstasy after the credits roll
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
Brent_MarchantJan 21, 2017
A smartly written, exceedingly well-acted character study of a successful and respected philosophy teacher who seems to have it all but loses everything in one incident after another. For many, this experience would be devastating, but, asA smartly written, exceedingly well-acted character study of a successful and respected philosophy teacher who seems to have it all but loses everything in one incident after another. For many, this experience would be devastating, but, as capably depicted here, such losses also illustrate the liberation afforded by them. With yet another outstanding performance by Isabelle Huppert (this is her year it seems), the film provides much to ponder in terms of what we value and what we believe is important. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
5
jgzegerApr 9, 2017
A pretty boring film. I really don't know why the critics fussed so much about it. The cinematography is good and Isabelle Huppert is fine, as always, but I couldn't wait for it to end.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
8
KenRMar 29, 2019
‘L’Avenir’ (The Future) is something of a rarity as today’s movies go and all the better for it. Had I known it was written and directed by Mia Hanson-Love I might have decided to stay well away - after being disappointed by the 2011 ‘Goodbye‘L’Avenir’ (The Future) is something of a rarity as today’s movies go and all the better for it. Had I known it was written and directed by Mia Hanson-Love I might have decided to stay well away - after being disappointed by the 2011 ‘Goodbye First Love’. But, with this surprisingly mature work, she has taken her own family experiences and crafted a story so filled with thoughtful observations the viewer feels more like a voyeur - within the unfolding lives of these very real characters. I kept expecting the now common clichés to start unfolding i.e.; lonely deserted wife seeks solace in a carnal relationship - but surprisingly and pleasingly, all superficial TV and cinema modernisms are avoided in preference to intelligent character study. Being raised in a home with two philosophy teachers as parents, Mia Hansson-Love uses in-depth philosophy to examine her central theme/s. Nathalie, her main character, illustrates strong points by telling her family, acquaintances, and students, that in her youth she had been surrounded by Stalinists but, she read Solzhenitsyn (who exposed many vague notions about the ‘idealism’ of the USSR!). Without labouring her points, she invites her students and anarchist friends to think for themselves, even lifting a veil against the trendy leanings of Post Modernism. She freely quotes the philosophies of Rousseau and Gunther Anders (might any of this had an influence on the avoidance of sensationalised clichés within the intelligence level of Love’s script...I wonder?) With succinct statements Nathalie invites them to recognise the positive points of right and wrong with an open mind. This is a woman grounded in pure realism - even though, beyond her control, some elements that have constituted her world till now are beginning to alter.

If I may have questioned anything it could have been the resolve with which she accepts some of her situations – she says to her husband and the father of her children; “I thought you would love me forever” - then simply, without even questioning his leaving her, goes along with it. This could be the reaction of someone who was expecting the situation, but to one who thought all was well....I’m not so sure. Nathalie is superbly played by Isabelle Huppert and supported by a well-chosen cast who, take us on a slice-of-life journey that’s reminiscent of some of Bergman’s better works – examining the intimate challenges that life brings into most all our paths - without trivializing or cheapening the experience. The careful selection & use of music is evident (as with earlier works) adding to the soundly grounded profundity of this enlightening cinematic achievement. The fluid imagery of prolific cinematographer Denis Lenoir (Still Alice ‘14) is not always suited to subtitled topics but one imagines the budget and subject would have dictated this style – so, some may find viewing and reading could need a little concentration at times. Still, the rewards are well worth any efforts necessary to stay with this strong and satisfying work.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews