Sundance Selects | Release Date: December 23, 2015
7.4
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 167 Ratings
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125
Mixed:
28
Negative:
14
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10
beingryanjudeJan 12, 2016
You'll find yourself lost in Charlotte Rampling's eyes. She portrays a lifetime worth of memories and with ease. 45 YEARS is subtle, but deafening. Looking back at 45 years and the choices made are no small feat.
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10
GinaKJan 16, 2016
Charlotte Rampling gives the performance of a lifetime as a woman who finds that she has a rival for her husband’s love whom she never dreamed had such a hold on him until the eve of their 45th wedding anniversary. Her husband has neverCharlotte Rampling gives the performance of a lifetime as a woman who finds that she has a rival for her husband’s love whom she never dreamed had such a hold on him until the eve of their 45th wedding anniversary. Her husband has never forgotten his Katcha, and the story of how she re-enters his life and how his reaction shatters what seemed to be a solid relationship is beautifully told. I found this tragic story deeply moving and overwhelmingly sad thanks to Rampling’s wonderful portrayal of a woman whose belief in her husband’s love is shaken to the core and, judging by the last scene at their anniversary party, tragically broken forever. Tom Courtney is also wonderful as the husband with the secret. Expand
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10
bruceylegsMar 19, 2016
A wonderful mixture of drama and pathos as Charlotte Rampling's character, on the eve of her 45th wedding anniversary, finds out her husband's heart has lain frozen in the ice in Switzerland for all that time. A great use of analogy toA wonderful mixture of drama and pathos as Charlotte Rampling's character, on the eve of her 45th wedding anniversary, finds out her husband's heart has lain frozen in the ice in Switzerland for all that time. A great use of analogy to describe the secrets that we all hide as we go through life. A superb, thought-provoking film, all the better for its understated nature. Expand
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10
smaherDec 28, 2015
It's not a film for everyone, but if you like character driven dramas, it is superb. It takes place in just one week and the pace is unhurried. The story is subtle and nuanced, but everything counts in the unfolding of this extraordinarilyIt's not a film for everyone, but if you like character driven dramas, it is superb. It takes place in just one week and the pace is unhurried. The story is subtle and nuanced, but everything counts in the unfolding of this extraordinarily difficult moment in this 45 year marriage. Charlotte Rampling is perfect in every detail in this unforced performance. It's like you're not watching acting at all. Expand
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10
maricogJan 16, 2016
Saw this film last week. And boy was it worth it. Kudos to Andrew Haigh! But the real gem of this film is no other than, Charlotte Rampling. She gave the best performance of 2015 IMHO.
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
hotfromcauldronJan 4, 2016
Simple. Simply brilliant. A masterclass in acting and character study. Rampling is riveting. And Courtney follows her lead as a couple whose past seeps into their present jeopardizing their future. Little happens but a lot is felt in theSimple. Simply brilliant. A masterclass in acting and character study. Rampling is riveting. And Courtney follows her lead as a couple whose past seeps into their present jeopardizing their future. Little happens but a lot is felt in the hands of one of today’s best directors - Andrew Haigh - who targets our emotions as he reflects on our everyday lives. His use of music, inanimate objects, intimate dialogue and silence is unparalleled. A film that will forever be a haunting memory. Expand
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10
RvwFromUpHereFeb 22, 2016
Of all of the Oscar Nominees this year, I have had my life changed by zero. I watched them, enjoyed them, and forgot about them for the most part by the next day. There are some exceptions. I thought about The Big Short over the course of theOf all of the Oscar Nominees this year, I have had my life changed by zero. I watched them, enjoyed them, and forgot about them for the most part by the next day. There are some exceptions. I thought about The Big Short over the course of the following week to see if I could understand the housing bubble better in my head, I thought about how Room made me feel while I was falling asleep that night after I saw it, but I've thought about the last 10 minutes of 45 Years more than all of the Best Picture Nominees combined. This was one of those movies that lingers in your head so much, The Cranberries could have written a song about it. Let me preface, this movie is only 90 minutes, and the first 80 are so incredibly slow it's like you're being forced to watch How It's Made in High School P.E., but boy does it pay off. The ending of this movie punches you in the gut with so much futility you'll think Gone Girl had a happy ending. I will also preface this movie is not for people who disapprove of sad endings, this movie can only be described as "Soul-crushing." Also, don't bring a date if you want the relationship to last. Couples should have at least 10 years of bliss under their belt, or be confident enough to claim they're the next Niles and Daphne Crane. This movie was finally able to do what no other movie in 2015 ((obviously) other than Star Wars) could, think, feel, and remember why I watch movies in the first place. Expand
3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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10
wcrosherFeb 11, 2016
This film, while slow building, is an absolute marvel. Rampling and Courtenay are both incredible, the story is well done, and the emotion that is hidden beneath the surface is so well created that it makes the whole movie all that moreThis film, while slow building, is an absolute marvel. Rampling and Courtenay are both incredible, the story is well done, and the emotion that is hidden beneath the surface is so well created that it makes the whole movie all that more powerful. The end scene is nothing short of perfection, and I cannot thinking of a movie that has had me thinking more after the credits all year. Expand
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10
knightofcupsDec 23, 2015
45 Years can be experienced through Rampling's eyes from the first minute to the breathtaking final scene of last Andrew Haigh flick. The film begins with Courtenay's character receiving a letter confirming the death of his former lover, a45 Years can be experienced through Rampling's eyes from the first minute to the breathtaking final scene of last Andrew Haigh flick. The film begins with Courtenay's character receiving a letter confirming the death of his former lover, a situation which obviously triggers lots of problems indoors. What is seen from there is a relationship made of feathers that, at the earliest of opportunities, is finally blown. Rampling's eyes silently cry in despair during the 95 minutes of the film and during the best final twenty seconds of the cinema in 2015, you realize what really was going on during the forty five years. The direction of Haigh makes us forget that we are watching a film, the performances of Rampling and Courtenay transform the two strangers into old acquaintances being observed. This film will be stuck in my head for days. Expand
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9
BHBarryJan 31, 2016
"45 Years" was written and directed by Andrew Haigh based on a short story by David Constantine. It stars Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay who, at 69 and 78, respectively, play the parts of Geoff and Kate Mercer, a supposedly happily"45 Years" was written and directed by Andrew Haigh based on a short story by David Constantine. It stars Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay who, at 69 and 78, respectively, play the parts of Geoff and Kate Mercer, a supposedly happily married couple as they, or more properly, Kate, plans their 45th Wedding Anniversary celebration at the local banquet hall. Spanning a period of less than a week in their lives, this is the story of a long lost romance Geoff had well before he ever met Kate and how this 50 year old experience suddenly impacts on their present lives and, more significantly, Kate’s reaction and response to what she now learns about it. Mr. Courtenay plays a subdued and stoic role as he attempts to move on from the past while Ms. Rampling’s character becomes more absorbed with the historic details as if this now deceased part of her husband’s life is still alive and in competition with her. Enough cannot be said of the wonderful acting of Ms. Rampling who, with little or no dialogue, is able to express more emotion and feeling than most actors might if they were shouting. Although the film is long and at times somewhat tedious, it is in effect mirroring the relationship of the couple on the screen as they, in their typical British civility, struggle through the emotional obstacles that confront them. I give the film a 0 rating and credit Mr. Haigh with successfully accomplishing the dual role of good writing and directing. Expand
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9
brewsterFeb 13, 2016
It is so easy to underrate this movie as Proteus does below with his zero rating. I, too, go to 50-100 movies a year, most of which we "screen" through Metacritic overall scores, unless something else draws us. For example, Woman in Gold wasIt is so easy to underrate this movie as Proteus does below with his zero rating. I, too, go to 50-100 movies a year, most of which we "screen" through Metacritic overall scores, unless something else draws us. For example, Woman in Gold was rated orange but we love Helen Mirren and we loved that movie. My wife is more sensitive to movies like 45 Years than I am, and there were times in the early stages of the film, I sought more "action". That ultimately was naive on my part. My wife understood the nuances, particularly of Rampling's understated performance far better than I. I love the Platters, and when "Smoke Gets in your Eyes" played, I hummed along instead of carefully listening to the words. When I got home and googled the lyrics, WOW! The more reviews I read that night and thought about the movie (I couldn't STOP thinking about it), the more I loved it. So, do NOT miss this movie and go to it with an open mind, watch very carefully (remember the movie Sixth Sense, and how you had to wanted to watch it again to understand how you could have missed the clues?) or you will miss much. I think it will be challenging for younger people to get this movie. Furthermore, if you are a little hard of hearing, you will miss some of the quiet, British dialogue. I must see this movie again with subtitles. I do not want to miss a word Expand
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9
foxgroveDec 23, 2015
A small low key drama that is big on impact as it rewards patient attention. The unfolding story takes place over the period of a week when Geoff (Tom Courtenay) and Kate (Charlotte Rampling) are about to hold a party to celebrate their 45A small low key drama that is big on impact as it rewards patient attention. The unfolding story takes place over the period of a week when Geoff (Tom Courtenay) and Kate (Charlotte Rampling) are about to hold a party to celebrate their 45 years together. The film slowly involves you in the couple’s relationship which is currently undergoing a testing time due to the arrival of a letter informing Geoff that a frozen body has been discovered in the Swiss Alps. This, believed to be that of his ex- girlfriend killed in a mountaineering accident just before he met Kate, unleashes all kinds of emotional turmoil, especially for Kate, and predictably ramifications ensue.
If the story is slight, although commendably very well written, the playing of the two leads is anything but. Tom Courtenay is good as Geoff but his role has to be considered a supporting one when compared to Charlotte Rampling. As Kate, she is at her superb best. In a hypnotically mesmerising turn, arguably her greatest, she displays all the inner turmoil through facial nuances and gestures. She is an absolute knockout here and this is yet another of her latter day performances that shows how maturity and age has really seen her come into her own. She is a fantastically underrated performer. Most actresses never enjoy the success that she has in her 50’s and 60’s. She is that rare example that defies the old adage that there are no good roles for women over 50. Well, her parts just keep getting better and better, as does she. Long gone are those indifferent roles in films like ‘Asylum’ and ‘Caravan to Vaccares’, enjoyable though they were. Director Andrew Haigh employs a similar technique to the one used in his excellent gay drama ‘Weekend’ and his location work in Norfolk is wonderfully refreshing. Most importantly though, having faith in his leading lady he unobtrusively lets Rampling carry the film. This she does with consummate ease.
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9
TimbarosJan 27, 2016
A 45-year relationship is in trouble after Geoff Mercer receives a letter informing him of news about his first love, which his wife Kate did not know of, in the new film 45 Years.

Tom Courtenay is Geoff, while Charlotte Rampling is Kate,
A 45-year relationship is in trouble after Geoff Mercer receives a letter informing him of news about his first love, which his wife Kate did not know of, in the new film 45 Years.

Tom Courtenay is Geoff, while Charlotte Rampling is Kate, both giving superb performances. They play a couple who have been together for 45 years in the lead up to their huge anniversary party, but it’s on the Monday that Geoff receives that letter letting him know that the body of Katya, his previous love before Kate, has been found in the Swiss Alps. Oh so many years ago Geoff and Katya were on a walking holiday when Katya fell into a fissure in a glacier, with her body never actually found. It’s the letter that Geoff receives that brings him back to the memories of his first love, but it does the opposite to Kate. She actually never knew much about Katya because Geoff really never spoke about her much, but the letter seems to peak her interest in their relationship, and she learn things that Geoff had never confessed to her. Kate didn’t know that they were very serious about each other because it’s something that Geoff never talk about, all those years they’ve been together. Has he been hiding from Kate the true nature of him and Katia’s love for each other? Kate then calls into question her relationship with Geoff. Is she his true love? Or was it Katia? Kate increasingly becomes preoccupied, and worried about this. There’s also something within Geoff that has changed. He has begun smoking again, and he’s been going into the attic to look at the photos of him and Katia. Kate soon discovers that Katia was pregnant with Geoff’s child, and that Geoff having told Kate that he had planned to Marry Katia. As the huge anniversary party gets nearer, and as each day progresses, Katia becomes very unsure and unconfirment of Geoff’s love for her, but will this new revelation cancel/ruin the party?

Director Andrew Haigh, best known for his 2011 film Weekend which captured the short weekend relationship between two gay men, does a similar take in 45 Years, where he captures, in a week’s time, a long-term relationship between a straight married couple, in the lush surroundings and landscape of the Norfolk countryside. It’s a different perspective from his previous work, as well as from his hit television show ‘Looking’ – about gay men in San Francisco. In ’45 Years,’ he makes us slowly progress to the big day, that of the anniversary celebrations, with uncertainty, nervousness, and sadness, not just for Kate, but for Geoff as well. It’s like their entire relationship is being suddenly called into question. And Courtenay and Rampling give excellent performances. Courtenay’s Geoff seems to have no clue how this revelation is affecting Kate, while Rampling’s Kate slowly absorbs the truth about Katia, and is having a harder and harder time accepting it. Hers is an Academy Award worthy performance, and she’s been nominated (but somehow snubbed by the BAFTA’s – it’s a crime!). Based on a short story by British Poet David Constantine called Another Country, 45 Years slowly builds itself from a film that is a very simple quiet relationship of a long-married couple into a loud obstruction where it’s questionable whether there is any point to go nay further. 45 Years stars out as peaceful and quiet, yet gets messier and destructive. It’s one of the best and most beautiful films of the year.
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9
PontefractiousJan 19, 2016
A teacher and a factory manager who has climbed his way up from the shop floor are retired and shortly to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary. News comes that the body of a long ago girlfriend has emerged from a glacier in Switzerland.A teacher and a factory manager who has climbed his way up from the shop floor are retired and shortly to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary. News comes that the body of a long ago girlfriend has emerged from a glacier in Switzerland. Little by little we learn that she died in an accident, that they were in love, that he has kept photos and mementos (in contrast to the 45 years of his marriage where they have nothing), and that she was expecting. The film is the story of the impact that this revelation has on the couple's relationship.
Most reviews have focused on the relationship's deterioration and the whys and wherefors. Curiously, though some came close, to my mind not one critic got it right. To understand the process fully you must appreciate that when these two married, distinctions of class were very much alive in the UK (some would say they still are). These two were never a good match. Perhaps the most "in your face" clue is his three failed efforts to get beyond chapter two of Kierkegaard. There are others such as Kate's expressed pleasure when he talks about bird watching. Here is not a man who enjoys intellectual pursuits. Again, his strong working class roots show in his complaint after the re-union lunch that the Len that they used to call Len-in now has a holiday home and a daughter dating/married to (I can't remember which) a banker. Jeff is clearly upset by this sell-out. But we don't really need these clues - Jeff clearly has what back then when they got married would have been considered a working class accent. And if you still need to be convinced, listen to Jeff talking during his speech at the party and referencing Kate's father's opposition to the marriage. Kate's father knew.
Kate, in contrast is educated (one critic noted that she was a head teacher). Her passage of arms with the caterer clearly indicates that she has taste and does not suffer fools gladly. But Kate has sublimated her middle class self. She must have realized at an early stage that the two of them have nothing in common. And here is the key. She has spent the last 45 years selflessly making the marriage work with precious little help from the self-centered Jeff. If pressed she would admit that it has involved sacrifice but it has paid off since they are still together. And then this happens. Kate gradually comes to the conclusion that that lifetime of sacrifice has been for nothing. The fragile marriage she has sought to preserve is meaningless. She has thrown her life away on someone who settled for her when his first love died. Self-centered Jeff doesn't even realize there has been a sacrifice and wouldn't understand it, still less appreciate it, even if he did. Yes, the revival of old and deep memories has had a strong effect on him. But he doesn't understand why Kate should be affected in any way. And there is the real story. Kate feels that her whole life has been wasted. Not surprising that she is beyond being upset. Not surprising that that sentimental cloying speech of Jeff''s did nothing to reduce the pain. And what a perfect ending when Kate snatches her hand away. Perhaps the most eloquent gesture in film since Jonathan Pryce checked his watch at his mother's funeral in Ploughman's Lunch.
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8
jeremypFeb 15, 2016
A slow, subtle movie that requires patience and a willingness to imagine rather than merely observe. Picking one central character, played by Charlotte Rampling, and having Tom Courtney's grieving husband secondary lessens the depth of theA slow, subtle movie that requires patience and a willingness to imagine rather than merely observe. Picking one central character, played by Charlotte Rampling, and having Tom Courtney's grieving husband secondary lessens the depth of the movie. She is shown as the victim, while he comes across as self centered, which makes his grief shallow, thus trying to force us to pick her as the aggrieved one, where in reality both stories deserve our respect. Rampling is very good as the emotions cascading inside her broil under the surface while she struggles with the ever expanding revelations that devestate her. Expand
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8
nutterjrDec 23, 2017
Subtle, understated but ultimately devastating, this is a quietly explosive film; a visceral study of the complexity of relationships and the fragility of love.
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8
SpangleJan 14, 2016
I have not cried because of a film in a long time, but man did 45 Years ever get to me. Holy moly this film is powerful. A stirringly emotional look at marriage and the nature of love as you age, 45 Years features phenomenal lead performancesI have not cried because of a film in a long time, but man did 45 Years ever get to me. Holy moly this film is powerful. A stirringly emotional look at marriage and the nature of love as you age, 45 Years features phenomenal lead performances from Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay. Though it is slow and deliberate, the film never drags and really always grips you as you watch it all unfold. The film is interesting in the sense that thought it focuses on Rampling's character, it really provides an astute look at how both men and women look at relationships, in particular at how they progress as the years go on. Wonderfully written and directed by Andrew Haigh, 45 Years is a phenomenal film that deservedly netted Rampling an Oscar nomination, but I do wish it had received more. Expand
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8
moviemitch96Feb 5, 2016
This a rather subtle, yet poignant portrait of a married couple who've been together over the course of four and a half decades. Other than the remarkable performances from Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay, the thing that I admired mostThis a rather subtle, yet poignant portrait of a married couple who've been together over the course of four and a half decades. Other than the remarkable performances from Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay, the thing that I admired most about this film was the fact that it had no need to be too dramatic or flashy with its subject matter and instead played it off rather subtly and naturally. Overall, it's certainly not for everyone, as it does require some patience while watching it, but this is a film that for some should evoke a keen response due to it's subtle and natural style that make it feel so realistic often times. Expand
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8
Brent_MarchantJan 24, 2016
Despite some intermittent pacing issues, this portrait of a long-term marriage in quiet crisis delivers with understated power and fine performances by its two protagonists. Its deft handling of conflicted feelings and adept treatment of theDespite some intermittent pacing issues, this portrait of a long-term marriage in quiet crisis delivers with understated power and fine performances by its two protagonists. Its deft handling of conflicted feelings and adept treatment of the uncertainties they evoke paint a complex, finely crafted story that leaves viewers hanging on every nuance right up until the end (and then some). This isn't always the easiest film to watch, but it leaves an indelible impression on anyone who sees it. Expand
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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8
NerdConsultantJan 31, 2016
45 Years was a surprisingly excellent film. i saw it's trailer at a studio Ghibli festival and wrote it off as a pretentious movie but i was dead wrong. the performances are outstanding especially Charlotte Rampling to which she has45 Years was a surprisingly excellent film. i saw it's trailer at a studio Ghibli festival and wrote it off as a pretentious movie but i was dead wrong. the performances are outstanding especially Charlotte Rampling to which she has rightfully earned an oscar nomination and it told a really engaging and interesting story about long term relationships. it's not for everyone particularly its slow pace but if you like a movie told visually with excellent dialogue to back it up this is one for you. Expand
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7
imthenoobNov 1, 2017
I think Charlotte Rampling deserves a lot more praise for this film than she got. The film is about a man who receives a letter that a body has been found in a glacier and it is that of his ex-girlfriend, who died in a freak accident duringI think Charlotte Rampling deserves a lot more praise for this film than she got. The film is about a man who receives a letter that a body has been found in a glacier and it is that of his ex-girlfriend, who died in a freak accident during his youth and her body presumably lost. This sets off a chain of events that shakes this 45 year marriage to the core. Rampling's character then begins to question everything she knew about her husband and how deep his love for her really is. Especially when he begins to reminisce of his past love and she comes to the bitter realization that she isn't the true love of his life and never was. It's a very bitter film and you can't help but sympathize for her character every step of the way. Expand
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7
LeZeeMar 4, 2016
Some secrets need to be left untouched for good.

This little British romance-drama was not expected by everyone. Without Charlotte Rampling's Oscars nominee for the lead role, it would have been an easily forgotten. Because it is very
Some secrets need to be left untouched for good.

This little British romance-drama was not expected by everyone. Without Charlotte Rampling's Oscars nominee for the lead role, it would have been an easily forgotten. Because it is very slow, the story is just okay, but the performances are the saviour IMO. At this age, Charlotte Rampling was looking so good on the screen, her youthful costume was maybe the reason.

The story of a long married couple, the whole movie takes place on the eve of their 45th anniversary celebration. A week to go for their big day, the wife discovers some hidden secret by her hubby. While digging it only gets bigger, but how it would affect their present relationship was told quite interestingly. It was only a single perspective tale, so the detail on the other side are not briefed to us that well. But everything was quite understandable.

In some relationship, some secret needs to be left untouched for good, only if it is not hurting anybody. Life is a long journey if you're an old and to look back your path. What happened a long time ago is not to be judged for the in between timeline events. In someone's perspective, some past incidents are fair. The beauty of this drama is simply lies how smoothly narrated this complicated issue between a husband and wife. Because even if you're not a regular movie goer, still you can name a couple of similar titles, but how unique this was when comparing with those is that's where it betters. It was not so good, but much better in many ways, in its own way.

7/10
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7
jrodfilmsJan 30, 2016
i thought it was a well done movie overall. for a movie with only a few characters it was engaging and emotional. however for a short movie i felt it dragged a little bit. still dont miss it.
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6
TVJerryFeb 3, 2016
Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay play a couple approaching their 45th wedding anniversary and a celebratory party. The week before, a letter arrives that stirs up emotions from his past and brings the sincerity of their marriage intoCharlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay play a couple approaching their 45th wedding anniversary and a celebratory party. The week before, a letter arrives that stirs up emotions from his past and brings the sincerity of their marriage into question. Rampling has received an Oscar nom for her underplayed performance, but it’s the entire movie that’s reserved and unsentimental. We watch them mundanely go about their daily interactions with a deliberate pace. Nothing about the film is especially affected or emotional. There are quiet observations and lots of her looking (into mirrors, fields, waterways). I found it tasteful and Rampling lovely, but the underplayed drama and objective direction made me impatient and underwhelmed. Expand
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6
smiyamotJun 18, 2016
Great acting, poor script. Okay, I'm American, there are countries in the world (China) where the person you marry is expected to be pure (a virgin.) So the woman character finds out her husband's old girlfriend might have been prettyGreat acting, poor script. Okay, I'm American, there are countries in the world (China) where the person you marry is expected to be pure (a virgin.) So the woman character finds out her husband's old girlfriend might have been pretty serious, or not, and she's bent out of shape. YIKES! that was 55 years ago and the girlfriend died in an accident. Get over it. So the story line is hard to accept, but the acting, superb. Her facial expressions and body language, she doesn't have to speak lines. She should have won the Oscar. Expand
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6
SteveSandbergMay 6, 2016
I have to admit to being disappointed by this film, and also thoroughly surprised and bemused by its composite rank at the top of the critical ratings. It's a very well-acted picture, but with the skillful acting in the service of a slimI have to admit to being disappointed by this film, and also thoroughly surprised and bemused by its composite rank at the top of the critical ratings. It's a very well-acted picture, but with the skillful acting in the service of a slim story premised on the idea that a woman (Charlotte Rampling) could be married to a man (Tom Courtney) for 45 years without ever sensing that he had had a previous love. This seems naive. Furthermore, although the embers are obviously dimmed in old age, you don't get the sense that this relationship was ever so romantic that it would have blinded the woman to the husband's secret for very long. Theirs has been a marriage of companionship and mutual comfort, not passion; without passion, there is no plausibility for her failure of perception. It was only when Rampling surreptitiously viewed some decades-old slides of the young woman taken before her tragic death that I personally felt any sense of dramatic involvement with the movie. The earthy, sensual face that stares out at us in those photographs, Rampling's diametrical opposite in every way, was very well-chosen; and in those moments you do get the sense that she would have been a much better match for Courtney….. But in general I found thin reasons here to justify the near-cosmic rating. Expand
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5
ScraperNov 19, 2016
45 Years pits the simple concept of devotion against a lifetime. To feel it completely, each movement and action of the characters must be held up to this light. I cannot dislike the movie as it was so genuine and uniquely reaches climax in45 Years pits the simple concept of devotion against a lifetime. To feel it completely, each movement and action of the characters must be held up to this light. I cannot dislike the movie as it was so genuine and uniquely reaches climax in the final seconds. I did however feel it could've used more of a revelation. There were so many chances to reach the heartbeat of the human condition, but decides instead to leave us feeling the way it's characters are: on the outside looking in. Expand
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5
fungusgnatMar 15, 2016
Kate and Geoff are hardly passionate about their lives, but they have some money, good friends, and a dog; they seem content. Then Geoff receives a letter: the body of his pre-Kate lover, killed in a climbing accident, has been found inKate and Geoff are hardly passionate about their lives, but they have some money, good friends, and a dog; they seem content. Then Geoff receives a letter: the body of his pre-Kate lover, killed in a climbing accident, has been found in melting ice (making this the first climate-change domestic drama?). This discovery brings memories of twenty-something passion and optimism into a house imbued with sixty-something acceptance, and the resulting trainwreck grows more interesting and affecting the farther it grinds along the rails. Takes a while to get there, though, or seems to, despite the film’s 95-minute length. Rampling is outstanding, and nowhere more than in the film’s masterful last scene. P.S. If you want to read a pro review of this movie, I suggest A. A. Dowd of the A.V. Club, who is one of several pointing out the ghost-story-like character of this film. Expand
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5
BeeceeFeb 7, 2016
As has been described, the film takes place during the week leading up to the couple's 45th wedding anniversary, when Tom Courtenay's character finds out that his previous lover Katya's remains were found on a mountain in Switzerland. TheAs has been described, the film takes place during the week leading up to the couple's 45th wedding anniversary, when Tom Courtenay's character finds out that his previous lover Katya's remains were found on a mountain in Switzerland. The movie is basically about the couple's reaction to this news. Both Courtenay and Rampling give naturalistic perrmances, but the film is very slow moving. Charlotte Rampling never really discusses her discoveries or her feelings with her husband, so the audience does get the anticipated payoff. Somehow there doesn't seem to be enough plot for a full length movie, and I was frankly bored. Expand
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2
swingDec 25, 2015
Well, the acting was fine and natural. The story was a single theme. The action was non-existent as was any humor.. It's essentially a dull dark story. That said, a;though the movie was about 90 min., , it felt like 45 years.
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NoahCowardJan 31, 2016
This is one of those movies that all the critics love, possibly for some perverse, sadistic reason, but the typical movie goer is likely to hate. It is slow, excruciatingly slow. There's a thin line between artistic and tedious that thisThis is one of those movies that all the critics love, possibly for some perverse, sadistic reason, but the typical movie goer is likely to hate. It is slow, excruciatingly slow. There's a thin line between artistic and tedious that this exercise in tedium never crosses over.

Mercifully it's only 91 minutes long, but it feels like an eternity. I've always been a big Charlotte Rampling fan but hated this movie anyway. Do yourself an enormous favor and don't go.

CONTAINS NO SPOILERS
45 Years is a self-spoiler.
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GreatMartinJan 29, 2016
Where do I start? There is nothing wrong with Charlotte Rampling's performance but certainly not worth an Oscar nomination over either Lily Tomlin in "Grandma" or Charlize Theron in "Mad Max" just to name possible other candidates. Do I sayWhere do I start? There is nothing wrong with Charlotte Rampling's performance but certainly not worth an Oscar nomination over either Lily Tomlin in "Grandma" or Charlize Theron in "Mad Max" just to name possible other candidates. Do I say that the film is 'much ado about nothing' and would have been served better being a one hour TV movie on Lifetime or Netflex?

"45 Years" seems just that long in spite of the running time being only 95 minutes but it is padded with many scenes of Rampling, sometimes with a dog, sometimes not, walking on the admitted beautiful shots of Norfolk landscapes where the story takes place or one extended scene of her playing the piano.

The conflict, that took place before they met, seemingly upends all that they have had is really a flimsy reason for what takes place. She was a teacher, he a factory manager and they have had a 45 year loving, comfortable, childless marriage with both being retired now, she still very active and he slowing down to illness.Without giving anything away it seems very far fetched that things always available are now seen and read for the first time.

Watching the performances of Charlotte Rampling and Tim Courtenay, who have been stars for over 50 years, are always a joy to watch and even though their silences can say a lot here they really aren't given substantial material to work with. There is a scene between the two having sex that is very funny and could be real to life but it isn't enough.

"45 Years" is one of the very few films that I would recommend seeing on the small screen instead of a theatre screen.
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ProteusFeb 9, 2016
CAUTION CAUTION CAUTION: The single most over rated movie I've seen in years. And I see 100+ per year. Humorless, slow, dreary and depressing. The acting is fine but the degree of difficulty is super low. Nothing is really asked of the actorsCAUTION CAUTION CAUTION: The single most over rated movie I've seen in years. And I see 100+ per year. Humorless, slow, dreary and depressing. The acting is fine but the degree of difficulty is super low. Nothing is really asked of the actors and that is what they deliver.

Think carefully before you devote 2 hours of your life to this movie. Or better yet just don't do it.
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Filmcritic1956Jan 5, 2016
Are you kidding me? 45 years was about how long this plodding film about two washed up old people felt like it lasted. If the awful pacing wasn't bad enough, the plotting--if you could call it that--was even worse. This film was based on aAre you kidding me? 45 years was about how long this plodding film about two washed up old people felt like it lasted. If the awful pacing wasn't bad enough, the plotting--if you could call it that--was even worse. This film was based on a short story and it showed--not enough plot there for a feature film. And finally, the conflict between the two characters was left completely unresolved. I guess that's artsy, but if you ask me, it's lazy storytelling, the issues were not explored so it's not surprising they were not resolved. Was the acting fantastic? Yes sir, but if you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig. Anyone who enjoyed this movie must have a lot of time on their hands and little to do with it (just like the two lead characters) Expand
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