Mike D'Angelo

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For 718 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Nashville
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 718
718 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s both intriguing and frustrating about the screen version, however, is the way that it flirts with a much thornier and potentially richer possibility, only to ultimately back away from that idea in favor of a straightforward plea for justice.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    In short, this is fundamentally a movie of surface pleasures, placing gorgeous actors in an equally stunning location and letting them parry with sharp words and lithe, angular bodies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s true power is elemental, rooted in weather conditions that all but erase the distinction between land and sky, and in the inky darkness of a tunnel traversed by one haggard, trudging figure whose weary body intermittently blocks a sliver of light barely visible at its far end.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It deviates enough from formula — especially in its arresting ending, which takes full advantage of Bielenia’s haunted visage — to be worth seeing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    This is a more professional-looking production, with a much stronger cast, but it has the same half-assed feel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The screenplay — written by Bellocchio in collaboration with several others — has no particular point of view regarding Buscetta, seeming content merely to take us step by step through his two decades as an informant.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Hagiography doesn’t magically becomes less tedious simply because its subject made the ultimate sacrifice for his country, however, and this stolid, mournful drama does little more than solicit the viewer’s respect and admiration for Pitsenbarger, whose entire life gets reduced to a single act of uncomplicated nobility.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Viewed as any sort of follow-up to "Beasts," Troop Zero looks like a sellout. By the standards of mainstream live-action children’s fare, however, it’s more mature and thoughtful than average. Just don’t expect any Oscar nominations, even for recent winners like Davis and Janney.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s no mystery here, no narrator wrestling with the limits of his own generosity and tolerance. Just a lot of stunning scenery and exemplary rectitude.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    What he discovers is powerfully moving, but every step of his journey — and of the copious flashbacks that fill in various blanks — tests the viewer’s patience. It’s like eating an entire box of stale cereal to get to the prize.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    So it feels quite ironic that Ip Man 4: The Finale wraps up the parent series with a movie that’s comparatively weak in the kung fu department but atypically solid at killing time between set pieces. The highs are lower than usual, the lows higher. It all goes down smooth.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    In any case, what remains of John F. Donovan is a barely coherent mess, and so eager for your approval that it’s hard to feel anything but sorry for it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    The movie version plays exactly like every other rehab-facility melodrama ever made. Even the stuff that Frey invented seems overly familiar, borrowed from sources ranging from "28 Days" to (somewhat improbably — people in recovery aren’t necessarily allowed dental anesthetic, it turns out) "Marathon Man."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Apart from its impressive (though partially digital) recreation of the Sistine Chapel, The Two Popes offers little in the way of purely cinematic pleasures, relying almost exclusively on the expert parrying of Hopkins and Pryce.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Dark Waters would likely have been a forgettable mediocrity in anybody’s hands, given its fact-based, muckraking limitations. Coming from the visionary who gave us Safe, Far From Heaven, I’m Not There, and Carol, it’s a crushing disappointment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    All of this letdown occurs only in the last 15 or so minutes, however. Until then, it’s good grotesque fun watching the hand make its way across town, scuttling Thing-like on its fingers. (Make it a double feature with the Addams Family reboot, if you like.)
    • 32 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    One hires Cage for a generic timewaster like this in the hope that he’ll make it at least a little more interesting on screen than it was on paper, by virtue of some crazed facial expressions and off-the-wall line readings, but he evidently wasn’t in the experimenting mood.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    What made this particular project so toxic? Simple: American Dharma is a fundamentally cordial conversation with Steve Bannon.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Éric Rohmer used to make one of these pictures practically every year, but it’s a tricky genre to pull off, and Sachs (working with regular co-writer Mauricio Zacharias) doesn’t supply the neurotic wit that would make Frankie distinctive rather than just… nice.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Mostly, though, this very empathetic project suffers from an inability to offer anything beyond what one would expect from its synopsis.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Written and directed by Ulrich Köhler (and co-produced by Köhler’s romantic partner, Maren Ade, a superb filmmaker in her own right), this droll yet poignant amalgam of the fantastic and the mundane ultimately suggests that while people can dramatically alter their behavior in response to extreme circumstances, on some fundamental level they don’t really change.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Banderas’ performance is so rich, in fact (he won Best Actor at Cannes), that it creates the illusion of a narrative with real depth and texture—he keeps us invested in Salvador even as the film repeatedly declines to complicate the man’s life any further.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    First Love ranks among Miike’s most purely entertaining movies (out of more than 100 now!), gradually building steam until it reaches a sustained pitch of cheerful insanity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Servillo—who previously embodied another former Italian prime minister, Giulio Andreotti, in Sorrentino’s Il Divo—never fails to deliver a memorably offbeat take on an outsize figure. Loro loses a bit of momentum once Berlusconi finally becomes its central figure, but it also gains some much-needed complexity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s no much going on here, either thematically or narratively.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The film shrewdly keeps us inside Chloe’s head, filtered through her very limited comprehension of her burgeoning and truly awesome abilities.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Things perk up when Fiennes belatedly appears, and while this isn’t one of the performances he’ll be remembered for, by any means, he delivers a fine moment of utter disgust at the government’s naked corruption in the film’s very last scene. Ending on that note feels right.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Once Sackville-West gets bored with Woolf and starts seeing another woman, garden-variety jealousy takes over. Not quite as fascinating as the story of a man who inexplicably metamorphoses into a woman and doesn’t age for 300 years.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    Uncaged improves on the first film only with its ending: This one boasts a modestly effective twist rather than a truly moronic one. Encouraging, but not nearly enough to justify a third trip down this 47-meter well.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Gottsagen is too lively to be completely pinned down by feel-good clichés, and his unpredictability brings out the best in LaBeouf. As in most buddy pictures, so long as the chemistry works, all else is forgivable.

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