Matt Zoller Seitz

Select another critic »
For 367 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Zoller Seitz's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Hereditary
Lowest review score: 0 Alice Through the Looking Glass
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 27 out of 367
367 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It has a goofy grin on its face from frame one. But it never quite figures out how to pass its good vibrations to the audience.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Human Capital is so exquisitely cast, down to the smallest role, that it puts viewers in the unusual position of wishing a film were a TV series or a much longer movie, the better to take advantage of its best assets.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It’s one of the year’s best and most distinctive movies, though sure to be divisive, even alienating for some viewers, in the manner of nearly all Malick’s films to one degree or another.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's the kind of film where you start trying to guess which of the characters will turn out to be a figment of the narrator's imagination. The answer, of course, is all of them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is one of the great contemporary films about the look and feel of a big city after dark, luxuriating in the vastness of almost-empty avenues lit by buzzing streetlamps. It's a real-life answer to fiction movies like "Taxi Driver," "Bringing Out the Dead," "Collateral," "Nightcrawler" and "The Sweet Smell of Success."
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    I didn't come out of this one feeling depressed or even particularly sad, more reflective. The sheer breadth and depth of this series creates its own sort of poetry, one that's strangely indistinguishable from journalism.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Once in a while you encounter a piece that seems like a premeditated farewell — a conscious summing-up of the life and work — whether or not it was intended that way. Varda by Agnès, a combination autobiography and career survey overseen by the filmmaker, is that kind of movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    At its most controlled and insinuating, Dark Waters is reminiscent of paranoid thrillers from the 1970s like "The Parallax View" and "Chinatown," where you know going in that you're going to see a story about how profoundly bad things are, thanks to corporate influence over government as well as the economy, but the extent of the corruption is still shocking.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's worth seeking out for the way it observes psychologically complex small-town characters struggling to endure present-day hardships and past traumas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The goofy and charming Klaus probably plays better if you don't know going in that it's a Santa Claus origin story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Lean, sincere, impassioned filmmaking, yet it fails to leave as much of an impression as it clearly wants to.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The most surprising thing about director/writer/star Edward Norton’s Motherless Brooklyn is how drastically it departs from its source.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The result is a disappointment that's more crushing than an outright bad movie would be. The original, despite its flaws, had moments of primal power and deep understanding of what drives people, qualities that are mostly lacking here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Beyond its brash confidence as a piece of filmmaking and its homages to the Western (including the use of a wider frame than was used on the show), El Camino is fan service executed at a very high level — an attempt to answer the perennial child’s bedtime-story question, “And then what happened?” after the words “The End” have already been pronounced and the parent has reached for the light switch.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It weaves every detail — whether provided by an on-camera witness, a document, a drawing, a painting or a photograph — around that set of intertwined arguments, which are too complex to explain in this review, but come across powerfully by the time the credits roll.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Alternately sad, violent, and dryly funny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    In his mind, Cohn was still the hero of his own story. And we get the impression from this film that, right up to the bitter, agonized end, he was engaged in an internal battle to justify himself to himself, and to the world.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It works. It really works. It's goodhearted and clever, and it knows when to end.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It isn’t until deep into “Moonlight Sonata” that you start to realize how many patterns Brodsky has woven into the fabric of this tale.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is the kind of film that explains itself too early and then has nowhere to go except into rote, B-picture thrills.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This documentary does a fine job of capturing what made her special.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Although Friedkin was notoriously grandiose at certain stages of his career, he comes across as mostly calm, self-deprecating and centered here, at least when he's concentrating on the nuts and bolts of moviemaking.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The goofier and more random the movie is, the better it is, and it certainly gets goofier and more random as it goes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is a Sad Rich People movie, no more so than a lot of American films dating back to the dawn of cinema, but it's no "The Leopard" or "The Royal Tenenbaums" or "The Great Gatsby" or you-name-it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Full antihero equality will only be achieved when women are permitted to carry a crime drama by being so charismatic that viewers would consider following them into hell rather than give up the buzz they get from watching them be bad.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The acting and filmmaking are so much more imaginative than the script (which also falls into the rookie trap of mistaking a lack of humor for seriousness) that in the end, this feels like a dry run for something deeper and more daring.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The worst thing you can say about this movie, and maybe the highest compliment you can pay to it, is to say that it would be even more dazzling if it told a different story with different animals but with the same technology, and in the same style — and perhaps without songs, because you don't necessarily need them when you have images that sing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The movie is sleek, smart, and reasonably thorough, and it offers the enticement of never-before-seen home movies provided by Armstrong's family. But it can't really stand out from the flood of material released to cash in on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, because it arrives on the heels of two daring ones, Damien Chazelle's "First Man" and Todd Douglas Miller's "Apollo 11."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's rare that you see an American film that is essentially comedic placing so much faith in the the landscape of the human face and the sound of the human voice. If the entire film were this focused and minimalist, it might have been a knockout.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Unfortunately, Three Peaks is so thinly conceived and executed that, for the most part, it fails to justify its existence as a stand-alone feature.

Top Trailers