For 234 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Hermia & Helena
Lowest review score: 12 Last Ounce of Courage
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 27 out of 234
234 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The best thing about Akin’s film is the dance stuff. The movie begins with arresting black-and-white archival footage of Georgian dancing. The rehearsals in the dance studio come alive, thanks in no small part to the drum-and-accordion accompaniment. Kinetically, the style of dance is percussive and assertive. It doesn’t so much flow as boil.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Robertson’s ex-wife, Dominique. Her thoughtful presence is a very welcome departure from the standard rock-doc formula. She provides the kind of reality check — an under-the-influence Manuel almost got her killed when he totaled her Mustang, with her in the passenger seat — rarely found in such films. In that sense, it isn’t just the Band that was different but “Once Were Brothers” is, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The documentary loses a bit when Dagg returns home, and an alarmingly perky score doesn’t help. Late in life, after her tenure struggles, she published a new edition of her dissertation and found herself rediscovered.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    When the best thing about a movie is the title, that’s never a good sign. It’s all downhill from there? Exactly, and that’s the case with Downhill.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Both Pryce and Hopkins are fine. But on the basis of the rest of the movie they shouldn’t have a prayer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Wolf relies on the videos far too much. That over-reliance makes Recorder feel padded, as does his frequent use of reenactments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    With so much going on, it’s easy to overlook that the most profound and moving relationship in either film is the bond between Elsa and Anna. It’s the most human and least-calculated thing in “Frozen” or Frozen II. Their love is the ultimate special effect. Ice is nice. But sisterhood is what’s really powerful.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The Cotton Club does look terrific and has its moments. It’s certainly not an embarrassment. It’s just not . . . very good.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    It’s McKellen’s and Mirren’s. Their back-and-forth provides a satisfaction akin to watching two masters volley at Wimbledon. Unfortunately, the ball these masters are playing with manages the perplexing trick of being worn and waterlogged while also far too bouncy: stodginess and over-plotting is not a good combination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    It’s never a good sign when the most dramatic scene in a movie owes its power to C-SPAN footage. That’s the case with The Report.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    What’s best about the movie is mood and texture, and the ensemble cast (the second best thing about the movie) mostly defers to those qualities. In that sense, Motherless Brooklyn might be described as novelistic, and in a good way.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Just to remind us that he’s Almodóvar — and to make it up to us that Serrano looks so implausibly different from Cruz — the movie ends with a bravura, meta-movie flourish that’s at once dazzling and matter of fact. It’s one more example here of Almodóvar’s ability to take pairs — not just people, but concepts (like, say, present and past, or pain and glory) — and happily join them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The biggest problem with Where’s My Roy Cohn? is the documentary’s attitude toward its subject: not that it’s critical (an uncritical approach to Cohn would be about as interesting as a daytime visit to Studio 54), but that it so thoroughly accepts his view of himself.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    So expect the upending of expectations: visual, emotional, tonal, generic. Especially generic. Is First Love a comedy? A crime thriller? A love story? An advertorial for subscriptions to Guns and Ammo?...Yes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Ad Astra is moody, meditative, and slow (though not the knife fight or rover demolition derby).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    What’s stimulating and fun about “Raise Hell” is quite stimulating and fun. But the more smitten you become with its subject — and it’s hard not to be — the more you feel there’s something missing or that what isn’t missing is yet too thin.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    A lot of jazz labels have mattered, but none has mattered the way Blue Note did — and, thanks to a proudly hip-hop-inflected present, still does. It’s the gold standard of recorded improvisational music. Sophie Huber’s briskly reverential documentary, Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes, lets us see and hear why.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Belkin’s smart, dynamic documentary shares its subject’s slam-bang style. That’s good. Watching it is exhilarating. It also shares Wallace’s aversion to nuance. That’s less good. Belkin has a weakness for split screens and rapid-fire editing. In fairness, that’s one way to cram in more material, and Belkin has lots (and lots) of material to cram in.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Sword of Trust has a dogged weirdness all its own, a singularity that extends to Maron having written the excellently jangly score. When was the last time you saw — or heard — a movie where the star composed the music? It’s just part of the its-own-world quality of Sword of Trust.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Magid has made a film that’s cool, assured, and understated. Someone should sign her up to direct a techno-thriller. In which case, she should collaborate again with T. Griffin, whose stripped-down score never calls attention to itself even as it propels and enhances what we watch.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    The movie is daring and unconventional. It’s daring in feeling so static, with a distinctive, unhurried rhythm. It’s unconventional in letting evocation drive plot more than events do. It can feel a bit dreamlike that way. A melancholy lyricism defines the movie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Demonstrating a mastery of euphemism and understatement, Ringo recalls how the Byrds “introduced us to a hallucinogenic situation, and we had a really good time.” Consistently amiable, if a bit wandery, Echo in the Canyon provides a good time, too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    5B
    Haggis and Krauss’s desire to use the ward as a vehicle to tell a much larger and more complex story makes sense. Yet it ultimately takes away from the truly remarkable story they have to tell, a story that may actually be more complex than matters of government policy and public opinion.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Although Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson aren’t at all bad together, neither do they strike sparks. That’s unfortunate, since the movie flirts, and that is the word, with the idea of a romance between them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    The documentary has a pleasing offhandedness. The same cannot be said of its subject. Christo, who turns 84 on June 13, is precise and highly directed.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Their (Danner/Lithgow) being together feels more like a device — there’d be no movie without their relationship — than it does a romance. There’s a lack of chemistry that makes for a listlessness of narrative.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    It’s an understatement to say that Tcheng is drawn to this material. He revels in it. Yet he’s too clear-eyed to turn Halston’s story into a morality tale.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Several talking heads appear, including George Shultz, James Baker, and Lech Walesa. Tellingly, none of the interviewees is Russian. A running theme is that many Russians consider Gorbachev a traitor. “A tragic figure” Herzog calls him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Goofy is easy. Earnest is easy in a different way. Disturbing is both easy and hard. They’re all dissimilar, and Hail Satan? has lots of all three.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    The movie is ludicrously long, clocking in at three hours and one minute, but surprisingly satisfying.

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