Joshua Rothkopf

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For 1,061 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Burden
Lowest review score: 20 The Equalizer
Score distribution:
1061 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cats may flop but it will be found by a likeminded audience, maybe the same one that rescued The Greatest Showman. Don’t be the sourpuss to tell these people they’re wrong.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It feels like a massive retrenchment—privately, a rebellion seems to have been fought and lost—and only the most loyal fans will be happy about it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sophia Takal's update of the cult classic turns the real horror of campus assault into a springboard for cheap thrills.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The material is worthy, but this continuing struggle deserves a more nuanced take.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ballour’s presence makes Fayyad’s film inspiring, even as we cringe for her safety with every overhead explosion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    But for every Thelma & Louise–like golden-hour drive into the sunset (there are several too many), you wish the movie also had the sophistication to cram from that classic script’s complex sense of injustice, one that had room for a subplot involving a sympathetic lawman. Believe in Matsoukas, though; she’s the real deal and she’ll get better material.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Little Women sometimes plays like a comedy, one that includes a crumpled cry over a bad haircut and several kitchen interludes that feel like Christmas miracles. Yet it’s Alcott’s visionary attitude, well-struck by Gerwig, that stays with you the longest: the loneliness of female liberty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Of course we all hate insidious environmental destruction; it’s valuable to have movies about that. This one works fine enough. But let the other less-talented filmmakers make them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    For all of its #MeToo heavy lifting, though, the film still doesn’t work, mainly for the same reasons as before: Constructed as symbols (not human beings), these characters have too much spy stuff to do and yet, not quite enough.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Steel battleships and raining fire are Midway’s primary colors; the movie flaunts its hugeness at every turn. You’ll never mistake it for the real thing, but Emmerich’s eye for historical detail is scary.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Yet it’s rare that we get a movie this municipally minded and Chinatown-ish, and Norton invents new elements with a free hand, including a Harlem turf war, a skittering jazz undercurrent (the music is by Daniel Pemberton) and a love interest in Gugu Mbatha-Raw. Alec Baldwin, playing a powerful urban planner, makes for a ferocious Robert Moses stand-in.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You could call it fan service, if the service is to teach fans that mimicking Stanley Kubrick’s chilly elegance—and even reshooting scenes from the original film with lookalike actors, a crime bordering on sacrilege—doesn’t make your take nearly as scary.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As proven by Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Final Destination 3 or the spunky Jessica Rothe in Happy Death Day, these fate-driven, high-concept horror flicks can be redeemed by a committed central performance. Countdown’s Elizabeth Lail, as a nurse who wants to get to the bottom of things, joins their company; she’s got a certain Jennifer Lawrence scrappiness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Heroically, Double Tap’s new actors, rare though they are, save it from being completely brain-dead.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s made with so much love, care and enthusiasm—plus no small amount of risk—you thrill to think that they’re just getting started.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Philippe earns his keep, not only by mounting a crisp, elegant production well above the standard of your typical video-lensed making-of, but by skewing toward anecdotes that most corporate clients would frown upon.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    After a while, you adjust, or rather, you get tired of probing the slightly-off evidence of your eyes and the headache it produces. There’s a lot of fun to distract you.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    There’s comfort to be had in executing on such a durable formula, and—life lessons accompanied by Coldplay’s treacly “Fix You” aside—Abominable usually resembles the swift adventure it wants to be.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of the care that Stallone imparted to his recent Rocky reboots—Creed and Creed II (both of which were produced by him)—is in evidence; it’s as if he were admitting that the Rambo movies were always trash. He may not be the best custodian of his own legacy. Graying, splotchy and barely intelligible, Stallone turns in a self-negating performance, just as ugly on the inside.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Damon and Bale are unfailingly enjoyable company to be among, steering the psychology away from alpha-male dominance to something more complex and occasionally mystical.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    On its way to an uncathartic climax that somehow involves a black-market-fenced oil painting and an Amsterdam shootout, The Goldfinch throws in so much diversionary character work that you wonder if anyone thought the stew was going to be edible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Breathtakingly risky but valid under scrutiny ... Jojo Rabbit isn’t perfect; sometimes it strains to reconcile Waititi’s more relaxed beats (“Let everything happen to you,” is a line from poet Rainer Maria Rilke that gets big play) with his visual fussiness. But he’s legitimately breaking new ground. It will find an audience that gets it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Murder, skulduggery and an avalanche of plotting makes Rian Johnson's latest a retro pleasure for those who enjoy being dizzied.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film doesn’t know how innocent it wants to be. Establishing shots of Manhattan’s 1998 skyline arrive in the cutesy form of a colorful diorama, just like Mr. Rogers’s show, but that gesture feels utopian and unearned, not to mention a little boring.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Personal History of David Copperfield feels, to a large degree, like a writer’s stunt. If you’re in a mildly irreverent mood (like Iannucci himself), you won’t complain too loudly about that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Waves shudders with ambition and nervy style; it never quite relaxes out of its harrowing first hour but the longer it stretches out, the more humane it feels.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Kids train for guerrilla fighting in a gorgeously atmospheric film that feels like a transmission from the future.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even as it drifts into narrative indiscipline, you appreciate the movie’s attempt to make sense of a troubled, beclowned present.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Featuring powerhouse performances by Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver, Noah Baumbach's divorce drama is a bruising tour-de-force.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As games go, this one’s a little too easy to outfox, but it’s worth playing if you need a quick diversion, or if the chess moves of The Favourite felt overly vicious—Ready or Not is pure checkers.

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