For 169 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jake Cole's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Jafar Panahi's Taxi
Lowest review score: 0 No Escape
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 80 out of 169
  2. Negative: 66 out of 169
169 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    The film may leave you wondering what purpose this franchise serves if not to give expression to Michael Bay's nationalist, racist, and misogynistic instincts.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    This adaptation gets straight to the heart of the material, which is basically two hours of stray cats introducing themselves.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    For all the emphasis on video game characters who can be swapped out on a whim, it’s the players themselves who come across as the most thinly drawn and interchangeable beneath their avatars.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    As a suspense film, it’s so sluggishly structured that it borders on the avant-garde.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The most thrilling and haunting details here are actively undermined by the chief technical gimmick of the film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    For a spell, Melina Matsoukas’s film exudes the concision of an old B movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    It’s difficult to imagine a worse time to release Brian Kirk’s 21 Bridges than the present.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Portraying Tubman above all else as a vessel for a higher power ironically only makes her appear less tangible.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    This is a rare case of a film that’s stronger when it colors inside the lines than radically traces outside of them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Motherless Brooklyn feels altogether too tidy, a film that revives many of the touchstones of noir, but never that throbbing unease that courses through the classics of the genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    At a time when the nation continues to weigh the fate of its auto industry, James Mangold’s depiction of the Ford Motor Company facing its first major financial threat transparently plays to nostalgic reveries of the industry’s golden age.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    In the film, a man's individual tragedy illuminates the emptiness of the systems that define him.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The film is a vivid depiction of how a confrontation with the unknown can so easily shatter the fragile bonds that hold us together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Ema
    In the film, the literal union of bodies is the only logical means of conveying the reestablishment of emotional bonds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    In Alma Har’el’s film, Shia LaBeouf’s plays an avatar of his father as an expressionistic act of self-therapy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The actors’ hammy performances only compound the amusement of watching a dynasty propped up by largesse fall to pieces at the very thought of actually having to earn their way in life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    In a time when awareness and acknowledgement of racial bias and extrajudicial measures by law enforcement in America is at its most widespread, such scenes feel condescendingly pitched to an unconverted audience of the imagination.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The film falls back on a reductive rumination on the balance between maternal obligation and career aspiration.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jake Cole
    At last, Pedro Costa appears to be more interested in how people get on with life than how they keep the company of ghosts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Kantemir Balagov depicts pain in blunt terms, but he traces the aftershocks of coping and collapse with delicate subtlety.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    It’s at its best when showing how gangsters undermine their lofty notions of nobility with displays of narcissism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Chromatically, The Load makes Saving Private Ryan look like The Band Wagon. Yet Glavonic still manages to convey the devastation and numbness that results from atrocity without resorting to exploitation. Trauma is approached obliquely, more a subliminal fact of life than a single psychological rupture to be confronted and mended.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film seems to have cobbled its set pieces together from a series of close-ups edited as if by random selection.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The Kitchen’s inability to criticize its characters without falling back on mild endorsement for their warped empowerment cheapens the film’s moments of reflection, turning them into perfunctory scenes of mild protest.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The film’s action is the most extreme encapsulation yet of Dwayne Johnson’s bombastic blockbuster work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Unfortunately, the care with which the filmmakers set up Them That Follow’s context and their characters crumbles in the final act.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Lesage pulls focus onto the aftershocks of trauma rather than the traumatic events themselves.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Aaron Henry is prone to pulling back from any moment that might give greater depth to his revenge tale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Jon Watts deftly weaves the epic and the mundane aspects of Spider-Man’s existence throughout the film.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film lacks for the more lacerating, freely parodic energy of The Larry Sanders Show and 30 Rock.

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