Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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For 700 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Lost City of Z
Lowest review score: 0 Holmes & Watson
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 700
700 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Slaying The Dragon is meant as an urgent call to action ahead of this year’s elections, and it is here that it really falters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    What it all adds up to has some of the unevenness of a nightmare, the belly sweat and oscillating fans of muggy summer heat mixed up with unrealities.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The problem with Banana Split isn’t the surface phoniness or lazy comedy but the fact that the movie doesn’t offer any insight into its ostensible subjects—among them break-ups, female friendship, and teenage jealousy
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While the partnership between Wahlberg and actor-turned-director Peter Berg has produced a few duds since the success of Lone Survivor, none have been as generically mediocre. At the very least, one can appreciate it for being environmentally friendly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Playing with genre cryptograms of gangster villas, opera-loving killers, and glamorously lit cigarette smoke, the film never takes itself too seriously, even if its characters never seem to smile.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This all contributes to the impression that the director’s interest in the project came down to just about everything except the plot. Which is understandable given the source material, but doesn’t excuse the fact that The Last Thing He Wanted sputters on most of the basic terms it sets for itself. Still, there is at least some nobility to its failure.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    His muse Ventura is there, too, cast as a meta character; he plays a clerygman who has lost his flock and now ministers to an abandoned church that looks suspiciously like a small movie theater. Which is about as close as Vitalina Varela comes to bluntly stating its themes: presence, absence, rekindled faith.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The filmmakers that Schanelec draws on for inspiration are all masters of one kind of economy or another. The problem is that Schanelec herself is not. Despite its austere, theory-heavy minimalism, I Was At Home, But… is lopsided and lumpy, filled with longueurs in which the brain begins to check out.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The dancing is mostly depicted in practice and rehearsal in a featureless room, captured in raggedly cut handheld sequences that betray the movie’s modest means. If Akin knows how to direct better than this, he rarely shows it. But if he never displays a knack for visualizing the physicality of dance (more impressive rehearsal footage can be found in about five seconds on YouTube), he does a decent job of conveying the frustration and passion it inspires in Merab (Levan Gelbakhiani, a professional dancer).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    An always welcome presence, Law is the only cast member in The Rhythm Section to give the impression that he had any fun making the movie, playing B as a survivalist sourpuss with impossible reflexes. Nonetheless, he is consistently dressed and lit as though he were posing for a watch ad.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The trappings of the boarding school, with its grand staircases, centuries-old cloisters, and self-serious teenage secrecy, are gothic. But Bonello nods just as much to American teen-anxiety horror. There is even an homage to Brian De Palma’s "Carrie."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Bantering back and forth, Lawrence and Smith manage to recreate some of their screen chemistry — though not enough to make anyone want to go on another bumpy ride.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Unlike the best programmers, it never transcends its derivative origins and basic thrills. It’s another movie about thin characters and bland monsters—albeit one that’s better than the norm.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 33 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Of course, Cats has always been ridiculous, just as it has always been ridiculed. (“Cats is a dog,” declared a notorious review of the musical’s Broadway debut.) But Hooper can’t even get camp right.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Too often, The Next Level passes off callbacks to gags from its predecessor as jokes, all while presuming that viewers have an unhealthy familiarity with the Jumanji canon.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Like so many of the works of Eastwood’s long late period, Jewell offers a story without much of an endpoint, with an uplifting coda that feels almost as jarring as the ending of "American Sniper." But somewhere within its surprisingly pacey two-plus hours is a compelling group portrait of ordinary oddballs in cruel circumstances; it relays Eastwood’s appreciation for individuals over masses better than any speech ever could.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Maybe it’s inevitable that the film ends up feeling like an extremely diluted combination of Matsoukas’ two most famous music videos, crossing the political imagery of Beyoncé’s “Formation” with the outlaw imagery of Rihanna’s “We Found Love”—though it’s nowhere as stylish as the former or as sexy as the latter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While it never feels completely defeatist, her film offers scattered snapshots of an uncertain society in its dog days.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A stolid film that largely rests on its director’s competence at helming extravagant aerial views of pyrotechnic destruction.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The truth is that a movie about deeply personal obsessions can’t work if it doesn’t have some of its own, and the prevailing mood of The Current War is indifference.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It seems as though the artist, all too aware of his reputation for both pageantry and shock value, has decided to offer nothing of the kind.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A generically competent but unsuspenseful chase film that never lives up to its potential for either social commentary or thrills.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Above all, it’s about the impossible desire, shared by both expats and artists, to forge an identity of one’s own. But whereas the films it quotes sought to create cryptic and contrapuntal meanings, Lapid errs on the side of the loudly obvious, building to a final shot that might as well be a thesis statement for the rest of the film.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 33 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Awkward and unfunny in exceptionally long stretches, Reboot probably won’t turn his diehard fans against him. But it’s unlikely to win him any new converts either. For that, there’s "Clerks," "Mallrats," or "Chasing Amy."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    One can smirk at the movie’s fuzzy philosophies and primordial clichés and still appreciate the delivery of Lee’s action scenes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Running only a little shorter than the average season of On Cinema At The Cinema, it’s never as cringe-inducingly funny or inventive as the webseries that spawned it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The result often feels superficial; it is neither a definitive account of the creation of Scott’s touchstone of horror and sci-fi, nor a cogent analysis of its aestheticized subtexts, those gritty and unnerving surfaces and the things lurking underneath.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Billy Chew’s screenplay takes at least one important lesson from the best of both crime movies and small-town portraits: The characters, however minor or ridiculous, seem to lead lives that started well before the movie and will continue long after. Well, except for Dick himself. He’s gone.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The sequence is Last Blood’s pièce de résistance, and perhaps the only compelling reason the movie has to exist. But it’s also pure, relentless, grimacing punishment at the end of a joyless film, choreographed like a ritual sacrifice. Rambo has always been a monster, but in his old age, he has become something even worse: no fun.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A mesmerizing sci-fi drama.

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