For 1,289 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 American Splendor
Lowest review score: 0 Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party
Score distribution:
1289 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    The proceedings, which also include Susan falling hard for a smarmy “Jumpoline” proprietor played by Jim Rash, are professionally executed. Yet the movie’s pace seems glacial. It’s as if the filmmakers tossed a bunch of fish into a barrel and didn’t bother to shoot them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    It’s a cogent expression of the proper spirit of resistance—that it should be based in love, but expressed in action. Direct, effective action.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    There’s a consistent inventiveness — and grim humor — to this treatment of a seemingly well-worn theme.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Blow the Man Down isn’t an earth-shaker, but it’s a small pleasure that makes you wish for more from its filmmakers, and soon.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s strongest feature is its depiction of a male-female friendship that matter-of-factly abjures any romantic component. Temple and Pegg, when their characters aren’t falling apart (and even sometimes when they are), convey intelligence and mutual regard with refreshing straightforwardness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    Potter delivers her vision here in a form that’s perhaps too raw, too undistilled. There’s precious little lightness negotiating with the dark. Her lack of compromise is, as always, admirable — as is her way with actors.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The movie exhilarates.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    There’s some grim stuff here, but very little of Willeford’s mordant humor. A small and potent quantity of this quality is delivered by the larger-than-life rock star Mick Jagger in the role of Cassidy. Jagger shows a refreshing lack of conventional vanity by allowing both Bang and Debicki to tower over him.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    Coogan brings his usual comic reliability to his characterization, as does Isla Fisher as the rich man’s predictably estranged wife, and they wring laughs from the material.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    The movie doesn’t always work, but it’s never boring.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    For patient or forgiving fans of idiosyncratic thrillers, “Disappearance” may deliver satisfactory spills and chills.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    These amiable fellow don’t understand young Robbie’s ambitions — what’s with the rock ’n’ roll and all? — until they put it together and exclaim: “You want to be in SHOW BUSINESS.” For all the grand achievements chronicled here — and the music still sounds pretty great — this still is a show business venture.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    Vitalina Varela is socially conscious, but dreamlike, elegiac. And an inquiry, too, into the abilities and deficiencies of film as a medium to illuminate human consciousness and experience. It’s essential cinema.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    The director, Masaaki Yuasa, is adept at stories and visuals where water is a major character.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    Mandela did not die before effecting a huge change in his still-traumatized country. This movie sheds a valuable light on his struggle.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    This is all interesting from a pro-am cinema semiotics perspective, but none of it is in the least bit scary. This, really, is what happens when you take all the wrong lessons out of film school.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    The minute Bill Cunningham starts talking in this charming documentary is the minute you fall in love with him.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    The big problem with the movie isn’t the muddle, but the strain.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The Cordillera of Dreams is a beautiful film about nightmares that have yet to end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The cast perform with conviction, and the whole movie is attractively, solidly put together. But its dramatic components, fraught as they are, are tepidly delivered.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The talented Morano, whose work on the TV series “The Handmaid’s Tale” shows a knack for shuddery grim realism, sometimes seems to want to subvert the espionage-action genre by bludgeoning the pleasure out of it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Even without access to all that it references, I Wish I Knew functions as an admirable cinematic tone poem about a place and its times.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s inconclusiveness is the source of its appeal; Zombi Child is fueled by insinuation and fascination.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    The movie is written and directed, with undeniable sincerity, by Todd Robinson. While its story mechanics are creaky, the valor of Pitsenbarger is evoked cogently, in well-executed battle sequences
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Glenn Kenny
    A dull-as-dishwater, paint-by-numbers cinematic hiccup with no discernible reason for being.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s structural dynamics make it play like a cross between “Nocturnal Animals” and “Sleuth.” But the stagings are stilted; the relations between the conflicted characters never catch fire.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Lawrence’s riffs almost always land. They especially need to in the final quarter, when the movie sets the bar high for this year’s Dopiest Movie Plot Twist competition.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    Barret makes the viewer understand, implicitly at least, the desperation of these creators, even as views of their work, and the simmering electronic Afro-funk of the soundtrack, make a case for the indomitability of their creative impulse.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    As the movie heads for its quietly ghastly denouement, its plot mechanism gets a little wobbly, which is ultimately forgivable. It’s a genuinely tough picture, but it also has a real undercurrent of compassion.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    It’s a challenge to keep action coherent and build suspense in the submerged environment simulated in “Underwater,” but Eubank doesn’t meet it, instead falling back on stale shocks that are not credibly buttressed by swelling bass effects on the soundtrack.

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