For 213 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 71% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Gonzalez's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Suspiria
Lowest review score: 12 The Walking Deceased
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 88 out of 213
  2. Negative: 79 out of 213
213 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Through to the end, you can’t get off on the thrill of this film’s craftsmanship without also getting off on the spectacle of more than just Cecilia brought to the brink of destruction. Like its style, The Invisible Man’s cruelty is the point.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    For Patricio Guzmán, to gaze at the Cordillera is to comprehend the range of history and the possibility of its distortion.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    By the end, it’s as if a good doctor’s god complex has been taken up by the film itself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Every scene here feels as if it begins with a grenade being thrown into a room, leaving one to wonder how it will be diffused, and after a while, all you see are the gears of various sublots turning separately until they mesh together and move in unison.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    It never resolves its commingling of the fanciful and the mundane into a particularly coherent argument about the legacy of trauma.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Castro’s feature-length directorial debut is a profound and casually artful expression of the lengths to which people go in order to not have to embody their desires.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 12 Ed Gonzalez
    A shrill and insipid spectacle of cross-cultural communion, but don’t call it stupid, as that would suggest that it doesn’t know exactly what it’s doing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Ed Gonzalez
    The way the film shuttles through its 90 minutes, it’s as if it’s been stripped of its most crucial narrative parts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout, the film peddles notions of self-realization and self-actualization that feel nothing short of moth-eaten.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is a haunting portrait of the island as a purgatorial realm between the poles of isolation and liberation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    There’s something undeniably ballsy about a children’s film that’s so insistent about pushing young viewers to think bigger, to be open to new ideas and question culturally coded notions of good and evil.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    Gaspar Noé's camera captures every freak-out, recrimination, stolen kiss, and betrayal in what is a miracle of synchronicity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    For a spell, Boots Riley's cultural ire is so cool-headed that Sorry to Bother You easily distinguishes itself from Mike Judge's similarly themed Idiocracy, but along the way it, too, settles for swinging for the fences—so much so that the target of its satire is no longer in its crosshairs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Hotel Artemis quickly reveals its future setting as an empty pretext for a banally convoluted and sentimentalized show of emotional rehabilitation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    It often plays like a toothless PR video designed to rehabilitate the Catholic Church's reputation in the wake of its global pedophilia scandal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    In the end, Disobedience is less about the subjugation of the self to the group than the courage to embrace uncertainty if one were to break out of the prison of a world one has been born into.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film's simple, redundant, but valuable moral lesson to its audience finds comfortable enough expression in an aesthetic that's banal but impressively consistent.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Complicating Sophie Turner's character would have allowed the film to feel as if it had more on its mind than pulling the rug out from under us.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The way that Dominika is at once completely transparent and at the same time impossible to read is Red Sparrow's most intriguing through line, not least of which for the way that Jennifer Lawrence makes you grasp the canny mental gymnastics that her character has to do in order for everything that she says to be at once truth and obfuscation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Emotional complication is what this film, so abundant in last-minute getaways, fake-outs, and half-hearted nods to the franchise's greatest hits, needed so as to elevate it out of its programmatic torpor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is a doodle, but in its offhanded way, it effectively attests to the resolute nature of the Russian character.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    At best competently mounted and at worst a case study in watering down chaos for an American market.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Hany Abu-Assad’s film is notable for the way it fixates on its characters’ rush toward survival, homing in on the intimacy that they achieve without ever suggesting that there’s any actual romance in their future.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    Sean Baker spends much of The Florida Project charging in vigorously nimble fashion up and down the stairs of the Magic Castle, in and out of its rooms, investing the minutia of the down-and-out lives within this little ecosystem with a bittersweet energy and significance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    In between raids, in between the meetings with ACT UP members and those who hold the keys to their possible survival, BPM is at its most intimate when observing the exchange of war stories.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is only in the business of supplying the sort of fear that hinges entirely on the shock of the exotic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film may not reimagine our sense of how the ties that bind bad men are rewritten in times of war, but it nonetheless gives a casually electric sense of how hardscrabble lives persist in such times.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout the film, one wishes for a bit more depth regarding Jessica's professional struggles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    It has the decency to recognize that only Elián González has the right to define his sense of truth for himself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Ed Gonzalez
    The film evokes nothing more strongly than a live-action adaptation of a Crate and Barrel catalog.

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