Christopher Gray

Select another critic »
For 124 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Christopher Gray's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Zama
Lowest review score: 0 4th Man Out
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 76 out of 124
  2. Negative: 14 out of 124
124 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    The film questions the fixed nature of human behavior in a world whose borders are constantly shifting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    The documentary represents a city ground down by inequality and division, where millions of selves who have by and large given up on one another.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Gray
    If only the film made more of the curious tension between Timothée Chalamet’s Henry and Robert Pattinson’s dauphin.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The film confirms that the ruthless knack of the wealthy and powerful to remain so is a universal impulse.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Gray
    Alejandro Landes’s film depicts amorality with minimal curiosity and a surplus of numbing stylistic verve.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    Corneliu Porumboiu’s film is very much a genre exercise, and a particularly Soderberghian one at that.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Gray
    As Mati Diop mourns Senegal’s lost men, she honors their grief and affords them tremendous power all at once.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    What's most stirring about Céline Sciamma's film is the lack of artifice in Héloïse and Marianne's feelings for one another.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The film is an intimate portrait of a nation terminally anxious about who will see fit to rule it next.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    Much like its subject, Avi Belkin’s documentary knows how to start an argument.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Gray
    By subverting the impulse to indulge a winning romance between its two bright European stars, In the Aisles insists on the dignity of its appealing but rather thin characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    The film elides politics in order to earnestly consider whether love is necessarily an act of possession.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    The film uses Santiago Genovés’s experiment to scrutinize memory and capture the feeling of life under a very curious sort of dictatorship.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Gray
    Even after the film (quite entertainingly) explains itself, it never feels like more than a howl of frustration and cynicism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The documentary shrewdly illustrates how media savvy can turn a fledgling protest into an international cause célèbre.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The portrait it paints of its Marines is appropriately discordant, redolent of the twitchy frustration caused by a long stint in a sparse landscape with a hazy mission.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    The film’s gritty, mundane agonies come to feel like a series of moral tests with genuinely unpredictable outcomes.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Christopher Gray
    Sandi Tan's view of what the original Shirkers represented, and what her new film should be, proves surprisingly expansive.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The film’s intimacy is as precise as its intellect is vague.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    Hale County dwells on the beauty of the everyday as it recognizes the fragility of individual lives.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    As sharply as it delineates an America of spotty, informal economies, the film avoids articulating most of the people who live and work in these spaces.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    Matthieu Lucci deftly carries the weight of all the symptoms that The Workshop loads upon Antoine, a resonant character whose inscrutability is at once dangerous, sympathetic, and eerily apt.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    James Foley’s film suggests that any semblance of capitulation on Christian’s part is a win for Ana and women at large, even if that momentary triumph leads to a further sacrifice of Ana’s independence.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Gray
    Superficial when it means to be elliptical and regressive in its attempts to promote pride and tolerance, Sebastián Lelio’s film is beautiful but vacant, the type of melodrama that reminds us that they shouldn’t always make them like they used to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    No American film since Zodiac has exhibited such a love for the way information travels than The Post, but it's nonetheless steeped in self-congratulation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    The film’s habit of courting and then insulting the viewer is a conscious nod to the cycles of abuse that mark Tonya Harding’s story, but the filmmakers’ attempts to implicate their audience are I, Tonya's broken shoelace, too pat and glib to be convincing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Christopher Gray
    It's hard to come away from the film feeling anything but disdain and a twinge of embarrassment toward Gay Talese.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Christopher Gray
    Through its energy and inherent beauty, Brimstone & Glory hits concurrent notes of peril and bliss, but even at a scant 67 minutes it can seem a bit aimless and scattershot.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Christopher Gray
    The film wants to treat Jeffrey Dahmer like a character, but it invariably frames him like a specimen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Gray
    It's incisive in its condemnation of the oppression innate in the social structure of Brooklyn's Hasidic communities.

Top Trailers