For 1,981 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

A.O. Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Pépé le Moko (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 The Love Guru
Score distribution:
1981 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Rage — shared by characters on both sides, even as they direct it at each other — is what “The Hunt” is all about. Anger is the source of its humor and its horror, both of which are fairly effective. The fights and shootouts are brisk and brutal. The dialogue pops with inventive profanity and familiar varieties of name-calling and woke-speak.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    First Cow is fundamentally a western: It takes up questions of civilization, solidarity and barbarism on the American frontier. And like many great westerns it critiques some of the genre’s foundational myths with bracing, beautiful rigor, including the myth of heroic individualism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is Porumboiu’s most elaborate feature and in some ways his least ambitious. Like a meringue or like a whistle, its substance is mostly air.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Young Ahmed is suspenseful and economical, with a clear sense of what’s at stake, but something crucial — perhaps a deeper insight into the character or the contradictions that ensnare him — is missing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    There are some jokey parts, some weepy bits, a sexy moment and a few fine displays of anger from Louis-Dreyfus, but they’re all just thrown together like salted nuts and cheap candies in a snack mix.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    It almost works, but as persuasive as the performers can be, Tom and Joan seem less real the more time you spend with them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The movie itself, which was lost until a few years ago, is relaxed, reflective and sweet, a romance shadowed by the complexities of history, race and politics that manages to be both modest and ambitious.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Like other big-studio exercises in pseudo-subversion (very much including “Deadpool”), Birds of Prey is happy to play at provocation with swear words and violence while carefully declining to provoke anything like a thought.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Bellocchio’s approach to the story is at once coolly objective — the movie is part biopic, part courtroom procedural — and almost feverishly intense. He has a historian’s analytical detachment, a novelist’s compassion for his characters and a citizen’s outrage at the cruelty and corruption that have festered in his country for so long.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Just Mercy is saved from being an earnest, inert courtroom drama when it spends time on death row, where it is opened up and given depth by two strong, subtle performances, from Foxx and Rob Morgan.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    Like any good novelist and every great filmmaker, Gerwig isn’t afraid to let her audience work a little. She trusts our intelligence and our curiosity, and also her own command of the medium.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The Rise of Skywalker — Episode IX, in case you’ve lost count — is one of the best. Also one of the worst. Perfectly middling. It all amounts to the same thing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The shadows are what linger from this flawed, fascinating movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Franz Jägerstätter’s defiance of evil is moving and inspiring, and I wish I understood it better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    At the very least, it’s impossible to watch The Disappearance of My Mother without a measure of ambivalence. Gratitude for the chance to make Barzini’s acquaintance, and for Barrese’s sensitivity in making the introduction, is accompanied by ethical queasiness.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    This is less a chronicle of forbidden desire than an examination of how desire works. Like a lost work of 18th-century literature, it is at once ardent and rigorous, passionate and philosophical.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The actors draw out both the spiritual and the psychological dimensions of their characters. The interplay, a duet with sweet and eccentric harmonies, is fascinating to observe, even as it undermines the overall structure of the narrative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The film fumbles some of its big gestures and over-italicizes a few statements. What lingers, though, are strains of anger, ardor, sorrow and sweetness, and the quiet astonishment of witnessing the birth of a legend. This movie feels like something new, and also as if it’s been around forever, waiting for its moment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It’s not only Mister Rogers’s kindness that hovers over “Beautiful Day,” but also his creative spirit. Paying tribute to his skills as a composer, performer and puppeteer, the movie affirms his status as a hero of the imagination.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    It’s a perfect introduction and a lovely valediction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    It testifies to the variety and vitality of politically alert genre filmmaking. It’s a suspenseful, sensual, exciting movie, and therefore a deeply haunting one as well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Ford v Ferrari is no masterpiece, but it is — to invoke a currently simmering debate — real cinema, the kind of solid, satisfying, nonpandering movie that can seem endangered nowadays.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    This screen adaptation feels like a clumsy hybrid. It’s a little too long and winding to work as a feature film, especially in the horror genre, and might have worked better as a limited series, with a little more room for the many characters who populate its grimly imagined American landscape.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    It’s funny and sad, sometimes within a single scene, and it weaves a plot out of the messy collapse of a shared reality, trying to make music out of disharmony. The melody is full of heartbreak, loss and regret, but the song is too beautiful to be entirely melancholy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    It is a rousing and powerful drama, respectful of both the historical record and the cravings of modern audiences.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The high-mindedness of the movie, its showy conviction that its heart is in the right place, dulls some of its political insights. And its grandiosity undermines the ragged pleasures of the genre.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are a number of reasons to like Terminator: Dark Fate — Linda Hamilton’s scowl, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s stubble, MacKenzie Davis’s athleticism — but my favorite thing about this late addition to a weary franchise is how little it cares about timeline continuity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Its pulpy pop-cultural credibility is inseparable from its honest, brutal assessment of the state of the world. Its ideas about the nature and limits of heroism — about just how hard and terrifying the resistance to evil can be — are spelled out in vivid black and white.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Huppert’s uncanny mixture of self-possession and wildness is never not interesting to watch, but when Frankie is off screen she takes the film’s life force with her.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The humor is so audacious and the psychological insight at times so startling that it’s hard not to be dismayed when an easy and familiar dose of comfort is supplied at the end. This “Rabbit” is maybe just a little too cute, and a little too friendly.

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