For 933 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Dunkirk
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 56 out of 933
933 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Do not be misled by the comic charm of this film. It’s a ghost story, brooded over by the rustling wraiths of bookstores dead and gone.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Despite these shortfalls, there’s much to relish here. To play a guy like Hank, who must resign himself to being second or fourth fiddle, is a tricky task, but Hawke pulls it off in the quiet style that he has made his own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The new film is definitely suaver and busier, glinting with wit and concluding in, of all cities, Singapore.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Everything’s in place, and there’s not a weak link in the cast, with Debicki — lofty, playful, and unreadable — in especially beguiling form. The idea that art, like love, is something that you can make or fake, and that surprisingly few people can tell the difference, will always be ripe for exploration. And yet the movie stumbles.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    De Wilde’s film is a more clueful affair, and Flynn (soon to star in a bio-pic of David Bowie) makes an arresting Knightley — more bruiser than smoothie, with a hinterland of unhappiness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The result is remarkable, yet it’s still a hairbreadth away from credible.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Whenever the movie strays from its hero, you feel oddly impatient to get back to him, to watch his cravings do battle with his conscience, and to wonder anew what’s burning in his blue-green gaze.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Anthony Lane
    Birds of Prey, alas, is an unholy and sadistic mess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    If you want family values, Marco Bellocchio is your man, though they may not be what you expect.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    You emerge from the film with a divided heart: thrilled to hear of a woman who, ignoring the dictates of the age, filled her days to overflowing, yet ashamed to measure your own days and to find them, by comparison, hollow and bare. Is it too late to follow Gertrude Bell’s example? First, hire your camel
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    What distinguishes the latest Cage freak-out is the care with which it’s paced; not until halfway through does he start to lose his hinge, and, even when his face is sprayed with blood, he keeps his glasses on, as if hoping to settle down with a book. Oh, and, if you’ve always wanted to watch him milk an alpaca, your time has come.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The Gentlemen is a mongrel of a movie. There are not enough twists and tangles for a proper mystery, not enough thrills for an action flick, and not enough laughs for a comedy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Anthony Lane
    The movie’s energies drop perceptibly in the middle section; lines of dialogue are recited at a sluggish rate, with lengthy pauses, as if the pressure of the presiding theme had numbed the characters’ tongues.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Victor Hugo would watch this film and weep.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Anthony Lane
    The movie’s outward gaze is radical, no question, yet it refuses to scorn the comforts — of ingrained habits, and of home — that are honored by the conservative imagination. Such equipoise is almost as rare in cinema as it is, God knows, in politics, and right now, though we can’t foretell whether time will be cruel or kind to Gerwig’s Little Women, it may just be the best film yet made by an American woman.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Invisible Life is a heady blend of the casual, the sorrowful, the near-mythical, and the carnally explicit — never more so, be warned, than on Eurídice’s wedding night.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    As often occurs with topical tales, which are hellbent on catching a widespread mood (in this instance, anger and disgust), there’s something hasty and undigested about Bombshell....the action is relentlessly sliced and diced. Why, we could almost be watching TV!
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Anthony Lane
    To judge by the fashions, In Fabric is set in the nineteen-seventies. And, to judge by its visual and aural manners, it might as well have been made then, so reverent is Strickland’s thirst for the period, with its soft-core-porno tropes and its throbbing horror flicks. If anything, this antiquated air makes the film a little too arch and over-concocted for its own good.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    If the story of Jean Seberg is one of the more wretched footnotes in the chronicle of fame, that’s all the more reason to treasure those occasions, onscreen, when she was not a victim — when she bore herself, and whatever pains she harbored, with mastery and grace.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Anthony Lane
    For an instant, I heard the rumble of the coming Revolution, and wondered how Sciamma would conclude her engrossing movie. In violent devastation, perhaps? Well, yes, but the violence is that of a storm-tossed heart, and the final shot is of a woman — I won’t reveal who — shaken by ungovernable sobs, with smiles breaking through like shafts of sunlight. Reckon you can weather all that without falling apart? Good luck.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Here’s the paradox: the closer The Aeronauts gets to peak silliness, the more beautiful it becomes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Sumptuous and diverting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Anthony Lane
    The Report has purpose and grip, as does any film that carries the stamp of Adam Driver.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Still, however obvious the emotional setup, Heller, Hanks, and Rhys manage, Lord knows how, to skirt the pitfalls of mush, and to forge something unexpectedly strong.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Anthony Lane
    Luckily, Ferguson is fabulous in the role. She and Curran take possession of the tale and save it with sprightliness; their smiles arise without warning. I only wish that Rose had been around when Jack Torrance was on the rampage. What a lovely couple they’d have made.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Bale is a cussed and calculating actor, yet he’s never been more likable than he is here — an irony to relish, since the character he plays makes so little effort to be liked.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    That blend of tones, with near-farce and emotional brutality blitzed together, is pure Baumbach, and he dishes it up for two hours straight.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Despite the déjà vu, there is plenty to savor in Miller’s film, and the final third, in particular, is quite the light show.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    If I had to define The Irishman, I would say that it’s basically “Wild Strawberries” with handguns. Like Bergman’s film, from 1957, this one is structured around a road trip.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Anthony Lane
    It’s no surprise that the film should so often stumble and trip, yet I would sooner watch it again and sort through my mixed feelings about it than revisit, say, the nullity of “Joker.” There is genuine zest in the unease of Jojo Rabbit, and it’s weirdly convincing as a portrait of childhood under surreal strain.

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