For 1,760 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Win Win
Lowest review score: 0 Self/less
Score distribution:
1760 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A clever slice of regional noir that carries a gale-force punch beneath its modest, soft-spoken trappings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Bennett claims her own form of autonomy with the movie itself, which could be read as an actress’s decision to stop hoping for good scripts to arrive over the transom and make her own luck.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    We might go into a Kelly Reichardt movie thinking we’ll be told a story, but we emerge with our consciousness subtly and radically altered.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Ann Hornaday
    A movie straining so hard to be edgily of-the-moment that it can’t help but be utterly irrelevant, strives to impress viewers with sadistic killings, oozing viscera and extravagant gushers of blood. But its most dramatic spectacle might be the sight of a facile, lazy enterprise being hoist on its own cynical petard.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A handsome-looking if occasionally dull affair.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    What ensues in Corpus Christi, Jan Komasa’s absorbing and spiritually attuned drama, turns out to be a fascinating exercise in fake-it-till-you-make-it, with a hefty dose of fatalism and small-town hypocrisy thrown in for maximum provocation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A delicious slow-burn of a movie, the kind of coming-of-age tale that looks familiar on the surface only to reveal hidden depths of beauty and meaning.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Once Were Brothers is enormously valuable, if only as a reminder of what an extraordinary run this extraordinary convergence of talents enjoyed until their final show on Thanksgiving Day in 1976 (meticulously captured by Scorsese in the magnificent documentary “The Last Waltz”).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In Akin’s capable hands, And Then We Danced becomes an affecting testament to heartbreak, resilience and emotional expression at its most liberated and life-affirming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What She Said pays fitting homage, not just to a great writer but to a vanished age.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    True to its title, Portrait of a Lady on Fire generates more than its share of heat, even if it never truly becomes an engulfing flame.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    With Les Misérables, Ly delivers a passionate protest on behalf of an entire generation, whose future has largely been foreclosed. His, on the other hand, is astonishingly bright.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In the judicious hands of director and co-writer Destin Daniel Cretton, it feels not new exactly, but fresh and urgent and more timely than ever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A Hidden Life is indisputably the finest work Malick has produced in eight years, as an examination of faith, conviction and sacrifice, but also as proof of concept for his own idiosyncratic style. It marks an exhilarating return to form but also, more crucially, content.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In Gerwig’s capable hands, though, even the most familiar contours of Little Women feel new, not because she has the temerity to redefine Alcott’s masterpiece, but because she subtly reframes it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    For its part, Bombshell tells a crucial chapter of that larger tale with coolheaded style and heated indignation. Its aim might be narrow, but it hits the target.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    1917 is impressive but oddly distancing; ultimately stirring but too often gimmicky.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    This is one of the most exciting breakout films of the year, introducing Attanasio as a vibrant new voice in American cinema. More, please.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This lively, intriguing and insistently humanistic flight of fancy — imagined conversations between hard-line conservative Pope Benedict XVI and his more progressive successor, Pope Francis — brims with wit, warmth and some tantalizing what-ifs. Whether the fact that it’s mostly pure speculation will get in the way of the audience’s enjoyment will depend on each viewer’s threshold for artistic license.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The fun here — and there is a lot of it — is to be had simply in allowing an ensemble of game, generous-spirited actors to give their all in service to the fine art of misdirection and mayhem.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    At its best, Queen & Slim isn’t just a crime drama but a nuanced portrayal of family, legacy and self-preservation — how they’re distorted by trauma and history, and how they thrive despite the near-constant threat of annihilation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In an era that seems fatally mired in fear, anger and mistrust, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood arrives as something more than a movie. It feels like an answered prayer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Waves is as exhilarating and terrifying as the roller-coaster ride of adolescence itself, plunging viewers into a world brimming with music and color and movement and hair-trigger reflexes that feels exterior and interior at the same time.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Somehow Baumbach manages to find a nugget of humor at even the most painful points.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Well, surprise: Honey Boy, Shia LaBeouf’s startlingly forthright, cathartic and beautifully acted movie based on his confusing and chaotic life as a child actor, winds up demonstrating what can go right, when the right elements are in place.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    For Sama is a before-and-after portrait, both literally and figuratively. What begins as a brash, bold, giddily optimistic love story devolves into something far darker, as viewers begin to question why al-Khateab is willing to endanger her child in the name of doomed principles.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The Irishman is a feast for the ages, a groaning board of exquisitely photographed scenes, iconic performances and tender nods toward old age that leave viewers in a mood more wistful than keyed-up.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Peppered with tense action sequences and propelled by a characteristically gorgeous musical score by Terence Blanchard, Harriet is the kind of instructional, no-nonsense biopic that may not take many artistic risks or sophisticated stylistic departures but manages to benefit from that lack of pretension.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Norton, who wrote and directed Motherless Brooklyn, does his best to imitate the genre’s snappy dialogue and clever red herrings; but what starts out as a mystery as intelligent as it is intriguing winds up being over-plotted didactic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Fayyad — who directed a team of cinematographers remotely when he was prevented from entering Ghouta himself — films The Cave with a grace and compositional sensitivity all the more impressive for being achieved under the most difficult circumstances.

Top Trailers