For 697 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

A.A. Dowd 's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 45 Years
Lowest review score: 16 Replicas
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 38 out of 697
697 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    If you can look past the gallingly obvious and derivative metaphor, Vivarium has its moments of effective "Twilight Zone" creepiness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 A.A. Dowd
    Resistance is like a maudlin Robin Williams vehicle inorganically fused with a by-the-numbers wartime thriller. In place of showbiz clichés, there are tacky WWII-movie tropes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 A.A. Dowd
    The real issue, though, isn’t that Bloodshot would fail an IQ test. It’s that its dumb fun isn’t executed with panache, smart or otherwise.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    Just don’t mistake the lightness of step for a softness of philosophy. There’s a political dimension to all of Reichardt’s films, which almost invariably follow characters muscled to the margins of society.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    Watching Onward, it’s hard to shake the feeling that maybe Pixar has overplayed the mundane half of its winning equation. They’ve made a movie about looking for misplaced magic in the modern world that, well, kind of misplaces the magic.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 42 A.A. Dowd
    Thriller framework aside, Fantasy Island probably works best as a comedy. At least when it’s not trying to be one.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 33 A.A. Dowd
    A nattering chore of a “family” comedy that feels written by committee and directed by indifferent machine.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    Beanpole is grim, but it’s too superbly crafted, and too alive with human spirit, to be a truly grueling experience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    Unfortunately, the script by Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski is clunky—in the convoluted nature of its reveals and also in the sometimes-baffling behavior on display.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    It’s a sadly rare thing: a sweet, madly inventive, totally mainstream romantic comedy, buoyed by inspired jolts of comic violence
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    If there’s a real draw to this bastardized variation, it’s Louis-Dreyfus.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    By its nature, the film is uneven—Estrada shares screenwriting duty with a whopping 25 poets, and as with any poetry slam, some performances are better than others, both in terms of the words themselves and in the highly variable acting abilities of these mostly first-time stars.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    It’s often scathingly funny—a dark comic millennial spin on the Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? template, buoyed by three expertly modulated performances and acidic bon mots.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 42 A.A. Dowd
    It suggests that Zeitlin, throwing more handfuls of fairy dust over an impoverished American South, is something of a lost boy himself. Like Pan and his posse, he stubbornly refuses to grow.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    Fennell complicates matters throughout, toying with our identification by pushing Cassie’s tactics into some uncomfortably nasty places, even as she slowly reveals her motives.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    The performances are a hoot . . . . But the film has perspective problems that extend beyond the slightly queasy, half-comic depiction of sex work.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 83 A.A. Dowd
    Hittman isn’t really a polemicist. She expresses her empathy and political conscience through a refined version of what’s become her signature style, zeroing in on details of place and behavior, both magnified by the reliably involving scenario of two kids from the sticks navigating the hustle, bustle, and bright lights of the city. And moments of startling, unaffected tenderness peak through the grimness of the circumstances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 A.A. Dowd
    The Assistant is more of a spartan procedural, its narrative a methodical accounting of one day—typical in incident, atypical in dawning realization—for an entry-level employee at the New York production house of a Weinstein-like figure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    The impression is of a provocative logline that Simien never quite figured out how to expand into a satisfying movie; once you get the thrust of the story, it’s mostly repetitions on a theme.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    Unfortunately, this handheld coming-of-age story is frequently interrupted by variably convincing stretches of channel surfing, as though someone recorded over much of the former with the latter. And even with pros like Charlyne Yi and Kerri Kenney lending their deadpan chops, real weird TV is funnier. Weirder, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    This is a space opera animated not by joy but insecurity—the anxiety, evident in almost every moment, that if it’s not very careful, someone might feel letdown.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    By the end, 1917 has positioned itself as a salute to the sacrifices of those who died for their country. Mostly, though, it comes across as a monument to itself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    Frozen II is just an echo, drawing prospective fans in without finding many new notes to hit.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 A.A. Dowd
    For as much as the story concerns leaping into other people’s heads, Flanagan never quite gets into Danny’s; his tortured grappling with his memories is abstract at best, McGregor’s mostly functional performance failing to offer the necessary window into that process.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    Where it fumbles is in the framing device.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 33 A.A. Dowd
    In Countdown, it’s the audience that really gets cheated.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 A.A. Dowd
    Lucy In The Sky ends up playing like some unauthorized Jackie Jormp-Jomp version of the Lisa Nowak story, as though they couldn’t get the rights to the names, or to the shit.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 A.A. Dowd
    The Irishman is the director’s longest drama, but it never drags. The 200-plus minutes pass in a blur of dark humor and characteristically gripping incident . . . But it’s in the final act, when Scorsese slows things down to a purposeful crawl, that the film accumulates its full power.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 33 A.A. Dowd
    In practice, it’s also really tedious: a slow death by nostalgia.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 A.A. Dowd
    Waves felt to me like a bitching soundtrack in search of a movie. Maybe I’ll find one on rewatch.

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