Road to VR's Scores

  • Games
For 86 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Astro Bot: Rescue Mission
Lowest review score: 30 Deracine
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 49 out of 86
  2. Negative: 3 out of 86
93 game reviews
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Half-Life: Alyx is one of the most richly detailed and immersive VR games to date, and a stunning take on the iconic franchise for virtual reality; City 17 and the sci-fi conflict at its core are incredibly well-realized throughout. Though it's slower than the run-and-gun pace of the originals, Alyx feels like a Half-Life game through and through as it successfully shifts between combat, exploration, puzzles, and even some notable horror. While the game doesn't offer much in the way of mechanical innovation, and the roster of weapons and enemies left something to be desired, Valve has polished the game to a bright sheen, the result of which is an absolute must-play experience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners is a slightly tuned-down RPG that's just begging to be bigger in size, although it didn't bite off too much in its quest to deliver an engrossing story, excellent physics-based zombie killing action, and an immersive atmosphere that feels as gritty and deadly serious as The Walking Dead comic books.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Budget Cuts 2 takes the series in a slightly different direction, as it puts more emphasis on straight-forward storytelling and conventional action. That said, it still offers up a nice slice of adrenaline-soaked fun, as you plan your way around instant death, but it may leave you wistful for the first's patently fresh outlook on life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The totality of the game lacks effective pacing as it bounces back and forth from puzzle to combat with little sense of synergy and no apparent climax. For those that are compelled by Boneworks' combat, the Arena and Sandbox modes offer up a great opportunity for extended gameplay, though we would have liked to see an emphasis on user-generated levels so that the community might flesh out concepts that didn't hit their stride in the campaign.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Although Star Wars Vader Immortal - Episode III is meant to be an exciting conclusion to the series, with massive robot battles, escapes down cavernous tunnels, and duels to the death, it's hard to feel too excited when these experiences crash head-first into its paint-by-numbers locomotion scheme and general lack of player-to-character interaction, which effectively muffles what should have been a resounding and climactic finish. It still however serves up one of the most visually stunning VR experiences to date, although its flaws ultimately compound in the third episode, making it somewhere between good and great.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Espire 1: VR Operative excels in delivering some familiar stealth combat in a new, more immersive package, albeit with a few hiccups along the way. In addition to its superhuman acrobatics, you may find Espire 1 a serviceable Metal Gear-style game, although it is still somewhat rough around the edges due to stupid AI, a standard but forgettable story, and a general lack of haptics and solid world geometry that might otherwise have sent this high-flying stealth combat game yet higher.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stormland has delivered on its ambitious vision of making VR open-world adventuring a reality, thanks to smart design on both macro and micro scales. While there's some rough edges, the game brings enjoyable combat, innovative world traversal, and satisfying interactions to the table in a way rarely executed as well on their own, let alone together in a single experience. With fully-featured two-player co-op and the potential for long term replayability in the Cycling World, Stormland sets a new bar while at the same time laying out a well-formulated framework that will benefit VR games of the future.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By combining shooting, dodging, and rhythm, Pistol Whip gets you moving in a unique and compelling way. The game is at its best when it leads you into a strong sense of flow where dodging and shooting fuse into a cohesive dance. It isn't without occasional frustration—having your flow broken by seemingly unfair deaths can be annoying. A generous set of modifiers and options allow you to tweak the game in significant ways, especially the Dual Wield mode which changes (for the better, in my opinion) the way the game feels. Pistol Whip has undoubtedly strong fundamentals, though it seems like there's untapped potential waiting to be unlocked with better level mapping.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Asgard's Wrath may not offer the richest melee combat experience out there, but this epic Norse saga serves up a truly competent RPG that's not only strong in the visual department but is also packed with a full set of VR-native controls, something that's been so far missing in ported RPGs. There may be some wonkiness when it comes to object interaction, but the charming set pieces and excellent character design lend a level of immersion to this truly feature-length game that's hard to beat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Star Wars Vader Immortal - Episode II continues the dark tale of Vader's search for immortality, and while it is just as well-conceived as the first, its main flaw is the lightning fast runtime of 30 minutes, which barely gives you enough time to get into the swing of using your new force powers before the credits roll. A second installment of the wave-based Lightsaber Dojo does an excellent job of keeping you entertained afterwards, although if you're just here for the story you may leave a bit disappointed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Groundhog Day: Like Father Like Son may not feature the most engaging gameplay, or technically precise controls, however it delivers a hearty helping of genuine sincerity that definitely sticks with you. Tedium plays a fair part here, which can grate on your nerves, although it's definitely fitting considering the source material.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Battlewake serves up a short campaign and buffet of online modes that mostly do their job, although it's hard to say whether the plucky little pirate battler truly lives up to its full potential. The campaign, which should be an important anchor in times of VR multiplayer uncertainty, presents a melange of same-ish enemies and a forgettable story. The game's online modes aren't taking any risks either, although there's no telling how the community will take to Battlewake, which presents some fresh locomotion ideas and a good dose of wow-factor.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Until You Fall successfully fuses VR sword combat with meta-game elements in a way that no other VR title has yet managed. The game’s physical combat is underscored with a sense of deliberate strategy that can change from one encounter to the next. With deep and interesting combat, it’s almost a shame that the game isn’t more expansive in terms of its environments and overall scope, but fortunately what’s here feels really good and stands on its own. There looks to be plenty of room for expansion on top of the foundation Schell Games has laid; throughout Early Access the studio has an opportunity to add additional enemies, weapons, and upgrades to expand gameplay in interesting ways.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Considering how No Man’s Sky has deservedly become something of a cult classic in traditional gaming, it’s disheartening that the state of its initial jaunt into VR is so disjointed. That said, porting a game as expansive as No Man’s Sky to a medium as complex and relatively uncharted as VR certainly had to have been a herculean effort. And, even given all of the objective issues that I found with this title, it would be entirely unfair to say that it isn’t a diamond in the rough; No Man’s Sky is now the most feature-complete VR game in existence.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Wolfenstein: Cyberpilot has plenty of style and atmosphere to rely upon, which is probably more thanks to the recent entries in the franchise than work generated specifically for the game. As a title that takes only 1.5 hours to complete though, it struggles to flesh out any of the concepts introduced to the player, and feels less like a complete game and more like the beginning tutorial levels for each vehicle. When dialed in correctly, visuals can be cohesive and even pretty immersive, although it's hard to really care about a world you can only visit for such a fleeting amount of time. It is admittedly priced at $20, however there's basically no replay value once you've beaten it on its hardest mode.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In its early access state, Gadgeteer is both a fantastic Rube Goldberg-style reaction machine builder and, at its most gripping moments, a true example of VR Presence—where the act of building and testing a machine becomes so engaging that you forget you’re playing with code instead of physical toy dominos. The collider occlusion bug within the physics system should still be addressed, and continued improvements toward the locomotion system would be nice. But, content-wise, Gadgeteer is already a complete package out of the box. At $15, I consider it a steal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Defector serves up some high-octane set pieces that are clearly inspired by the myriad of Mission Impossible films, but is hobbled by a lackluster arcade shooter and toothless interactions with NPCs to boot. Its bog standard action movie narrative is mostly forgettable, but users may forgive many of Defector's cons considering its $20 launch price.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fujii doesn't fit squarely into an existing genre, but does a good job of making you feel like you're exploring and discovering a world you've never seen before but are glad to be able to visit. Thoughtful design is apparent throughout from art direction, visual & sound effects, locomotion, and interaction; Fujii's organic and reactive world is ripe with satisfying 'game feel' that shines brightly thanks to VR's ability to let you reach out and touch what's around you. While the game's free-form gardening mechanics feel adequately deep, it's missing a compelling reason for players to return after they've already discovered the extent of Fujii's relatively small world.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    With strong gunplay that doesn't overstay its welcome, Blood & Truth plays out like a guided adventure through an action movie. Sony's London Studio has thoughtfully crafted the game with shooting, locomotion, and interaction mechanics that feel good without being overly complex or clunky. The game's action is underpinned with some truly impressive virtual characters which can be enthralling at times. Unfortunately the story they're in service of can't match the excellent renderings and performances. Though it only took me a little more than four hours to complete the main campaign, it still felt like an adventure worth taking.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    On the surface level. Vacation Simulator is a seemingly familiar dive back into the whimsical world of Job Simulator, although this time around the studio has added a fair bit of structure and story to the game that really gives the vacation-focused sequel some much needed legs. Since you're given a wide swath of activities and only a few requirements to complete them, you're basically left to your own devices to have the most fun you want to have. In the end, it wasn't as relaxing as a vacation, but I certainly came out the other end with a smile on my face and enough reason to go back in after finishing the main story line.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Space Junkies is a technically proficient arena shooter that hits it out of the park in many aspects, including visuals, gun play, immersive environments, and comfort. There's an elephant in the room though: it's a pretty standard arena shooter experience that relies solely on multiplayer, which is still a very delicate thing in VR. While extremely capable, it remains to be seen whether it has the guts to drive user engagement numbers to keep it a healthy and bustling community based on such a well-trodden formula.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I walked away from Final Assault feeling that all of the basic ingredients were there to make for a truly engrossing and fun game. The addition of a campaign mode though, which is promised to release sometime between now and its March 2019 launch, will make it much more appealing for players like me who would rather play offline. That said, I’ll definitely be playing more on the game’s road to launch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Angry Birds VR: The Isle of Pigs proves that Angry Birds just works in VR, replete with it's topsy-turvy structures and little piggy fiends now fully realized in 3D. The game's shooting mechanic is extremely intuitive, and variably difficult levels provide a satisfying 2-3 hours of pig-shooting gameplay. There's clearly room to grow with more enemy types and birdbrained ammo still yet to come, although as it stands now, it totally captures the 'pure' Angry Birds experience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A Fisherman's Tale is basically a well realized taster for many concepts we wish could have been fleshed out to greater effect. The game's narrative is banal, but inoffensive, and should appeal to younger gamers more so than adults, and the same can be said about the level of difficulty on the puzzles themselves. In the end, it's a bit like stepping into a storybook, replete with all the requisite charm and pre-chewed concepts that ought to delight at least more than a few kids and kids-at-heart, but not anyone looking for a serious adventure worth more than the one hour of gameplay it provides.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Blade & Sorcery strongly demonstrates that physics-based melee can work in the right conditions. It’s not clear at this point whether it will stay on the tech demo side of things instead of a more fleshed-out game though. Early adopters of the game GORN don’t seem to have a problem with that in the slightest, so hopefully those impressive slow-mo combat gifs will keep on coming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Borderlands 2 VR technically works in VR but hasn't managed to escape the feeling of being an outright port. There's not much to the game which really feels like it's making good use of VR, and more than a handful of players are likely to find the game uncomfortable without cranking up the comfort settings. By the time you add up all the cons of playing the game in VR—no co-op, no DLC, no VR-specific interactions, poor graphics, gamepad-first design, and necessary immersion-reducing comfort settings—you might start to wonder why you aren't just playing the original Borderlands 2 in PSVR's 'game theater' mode—if not on your TV without the bother of the headset.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Beat Saber's signature VR rhythm gameplay feels solid on PSVR, even at the highest levels of difficulty. This is a highly active game that not only creates a great sense of embodiment, but can also be a decent workout. The new Campaign mode adds surprising life to the game, and modifiers combined with objectives can bring new meaning and challenge to songs you thought you knew forwards and backwards. A roster of 16 quality songs is a good start, and the company plans to add more over time, but how much additional songs will cost and whether or not they come quickly enough to keep players satiated in the long term is still up in the air.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Echo Combat shines when you're in the heat of the moment, with its brilliant zero-g locomotion scheme, and variety of weapons, counter-weapons and throwable grenades; despite only serving up three maps and two gameplay modes, there's just enough meat on the bone here. The lobby and match-making system so far have only gotten in the way of this, rather than helped, but offer minor inconvenience to the overall feeling that the game is truly from the future.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Déraciné is one of the finest examples yet of someone setting out to create a VR game before actually finding out what's fun or interesting to do when you have a headset on your head and motion tracked controllers in your hands. Although comfortable to play and decent looking, the game is designed in a way that perfectly deprives the player of any agency, leaving it as little more than a point and click simulator where you watch a woefully scattered story about characters you have no reason to care about. If nothing else, Déraciné offers up several concrete examples of how not to design a VR game.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Evasion brands itself as a bullet-hell shooter, but doesn't quite focus in on what makes the genre so appealing. While some of the elements are there, what results is an often ineffectual standard arcade shooter with a measure of random laser-filled chaos to its name. Co-op mode is measurably a better experience than single player, but only just, as player-to-player interactions are limited to infinite heals, making the human element the only pressing reason to stick around.

Top Trailers