Paste Magazine's Scores

For 3,484 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Score distribution:
3484 music reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    The Honduran-American artist proves that raw personal narratives and dance pop can happily coexist, picking up the mantle from forerunners like Robyn.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    Every time The Strokes tap into their old power, they get distracted by a shiny but fruitless new direction. But not every risk here is a wash. ... Despite The New Abnormal’s surprises, it tends to resonate most when The Strokes don’t try to be something they’re not.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Catholic Action have broadened their palette far beyond the jumpy guitar pop of their debut. While adding faint touches of synth-pop, post-punk and art rock, they’ve managed to retain the exuberance that sets them apart.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Heaven is irreconcilably an album with staying power, one we’ll be referring to years from now as a benchmark for the sound of rock n’ roll and R&B. Tumor is an enigma, one who will continue to prove their sleeves teem with new tricks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Now more than ever, the escapist quality of music cannot be underestimated. Little Dragon heartily delivers on that front throughout New Me, Same Us, opening the door to a candy-colored world where the beats are chill and every word is sung softly by Nagano.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    When an artist completely and beautifully upends the conventions of an entire genre, they’re probably aware of their capabilities. Saint Cloud is the sound of Katie Crutchfield at her most conscious, comfortable and controlled.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Sister completely one-ups the band’s debut from eight years ago.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Aporia, by no means, is going to be considered an essential Sufjan album. However, for electronic obsessives and longtime followers, the record will feel like absolute candy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Reznor’s letter paints Ghosts V: Together as hopeful and Ghosts VI: Locusts as fearful, but the moods evoked by both are too richly layered to just dichotomize the two records along such bold lines. Together contains more than its fair share of excruciating suspense (the incessant siren-like wail of “Apart,” for example).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Reznor’s letter paints Ghosts V: Together as hopeful and Ghosts VI: Locusts as fearful, but the moods evoked by both are too richly layered to just dichotomize the two records along such bold lines. ... Locusts harbors pockets of peaceful reflection (such as the one-two respite of “Trust Fades” and “A Really Bad Night”).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    The Orb are deep in their own pocket here and welcome all to join them in their warm depths. Whether anyone will heed their call after all this time remains to be seen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    What hovers over this lovely, late-night listen is the unavoidable passing of time: a nostalgic filter through which each groggy gem should be viewed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    925
    925’s most hedonistic narratives might be cause for condemnation, but let’s not cancel Sorry yet—the album’s more grounded poems suggest that the band are perceptive enough to render their loftiest tales with scorn.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    This is music that is nearly impossible to dislike and is a fair recommendation for almost anyone seeking tranquility or quiet music for contemplation. Still, we should expect more from the Eno brothers, who are both iconic musicians in their own right and have left their impression on both the mainstream and experimental worlds forever.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Building on a well-received debut, and taking a bold step in a new direction. It’s an impressive feat that Glaspy manages to do both at once.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Understandably, The Caretaker’s stories are often not pretty sights, even if the music always is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Walking Proof’s balanced blend of quirk, confidence and craftsmanship make it a 2020 standout, both within the sphere of Nashville’s rich music scene and without. The genre flexibility doesn’t hurt.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Snapshot of a Beginner wants to have fun, whether through the swaying, airy scheme of its most danceable tracks or the up-tempo noodling of its energetic ones. Finding greater artistic value in the weirdness is a bonus.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    What made their previous work so special was their ability to encompass the listener’s consciousness, looming over uncomfortable moments and allowing them to feel gratitude for the ensuing moments of relief. Ceremony lacks that control, and instead assumes the listener wants to be dragged around this disorienting hall of funhouse mirrors without looking into a mirror themselves.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their music is overwhelming, but Irreversible Entanglements’ excellent second album, Who Sent You?, proves that it’s essential, too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The first four songs alone are a revelation of sustained focus and fury. ... It would be impressive if Gigaton retained the thrill and invention of its first half, but that’s a tall order. There are invariably duds mixed amongst its 57-minute runtime.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Truly great pop is escapist, a chance to transform the otherwise mundane into something divine for a three-minute time span. Tesfaye doesn’t always get it right, but on After Hours, he offers up at least a few moments of communion during a time of isolation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Uneasy Laughter is fine. It’d be much better if it was either divorced from ruminations on honesty, or if the band actually managed to define themselves without leaning on ’80s nostalgia.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Sorry You Couldn’t Make It represents yet another late-career experiment in a lengthy one filled with them, a back-to-basics approach by an artist who’s seen it all. There’s no telling where Swamp Dogg goes from here, but if his most recent handful of releases are anything to go off of, it’ll likely sound nothing like Sorry You Couldn’t Make It. But it also means that no matter what genre he tries on next, the results will be astounding.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    With such lovely environmental textures, Sixteen Oceans makes it easy to imagine how warm a fully ambient album from Four Tet might be. For now, it’s nice to be able to stare out the window with Sixteen Oceans.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    Fans of folk and Malkmus alike will find something to love here, even if Traditional Techniques doesn’t quite make the grade.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Every Bad is the nuanced album that indie rock has needed for years.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    THICK lay it all out in a way that isn’t subtle, but that’s okay. Their vocals convey emotion as raw as their instruments, and that alone is something worthy of praise when studios frequently make bands sound cookie-cutter.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With its genre-agnostic, all-the-influences approach, Ricky Music is somehow Porches’ most cohesive album so far.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    It’s not clear on Out of My Province what conclusions Reid reached, if any, but maybe this is one of those times when the journey is the most important part. It’s certainly resulted in a rewarding album, one that ought to serve as a breakthrough for an artist on her way up.