New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 4,903 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Chris
Lowest review score: 0 Jagged Little Pill Acoustic
Score distribution:
4903 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a no-holds-barred trip into Taylor Hawkins’ personal favourites, and a loving homage to some of classic rock’s greatest voices.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though not quite closure, ‘Lost Wisdom Pt. 2’ is the sound of Mount Eerie reaching clarity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s the social commentary that makes this experimental album feel vital and unifying. Okereke lyrically eviscerates the politicians who’ve caused divisions based on race, wealth, sexuality and gender, but also offers a vision of hope and a desire for England to rebuild.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By its close, FKA twigs is an unstoppable force of nature.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ne-Yo‘s overly polished vocals not sit well and Preemo’s production sounds uncharacteristically remedial. Sometimes, too, Guru’s absence is a little too noticeable. ... But these hiccups aren’t enough to derail the album’s quest to remind fans why the duo’s name is mentioned amongst the hip-hop greats.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These two rap entrepreneurs have proven that it was worth the wait for another studio album. The years between ‘Revenge Is Sweet’ and their debut ‘Long Way Home’ have been fruitful for the duo, but – for all their dabbling – this is a welcome return to their roots.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The brevity and density of the album, coupled with the unique production, makes it seem like an epilogue to ‘Some Rap Songs’. Earl Sweatshirt has made another project that listeners will scrutinise and dissect repeatedly. It’s further proof that Earl Sweatshirt is a generational talent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Myths 004 certainly hits the mark for “embracing the chaos” as a “crude holiday scrapbook”, as they promised in a release accompanying the EP. But is it actually an enjoyable listen? Not really.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As with each of his albums to date, Kiwanuka navigates the past and the present, skilfully making sounds and subjects appear both classic and contemporary at once.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Woptober II is much more intimate. ... A lot has changed since it was last open season on Gucci Mane. The optimism and positivity on this album is infectious, even when he’s reminded of the darker times.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At just 11 tracks and 27 minutes long, it’s concise by West’s standards – the days of sprawling masterworks such as ‘My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy’ and ‘The Life Of Pablo’ are perhaps behind him – but there’s density and focus throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A dazzling follow up to ‘Apricot Princess’, Rex Orange County’s third studio album is a total delight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What’s My Name dares you to continue listening, to see if you can make it through its first song without spontaneously combusting from second-hand embarrassment, a spectral groan of “Grandaaad” escaping from your ashes as they sizzle and singe. ... But perhaps opening with such a heinous song is actually a genius move. In isolation, they might not fare so well but, after that, nothing else sounds as bad.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Maybe this album is a little rough around the edges, and doesn’t quite commit enough to experimentation, but overall it’s an assured debut that suggests a very bright future. If King Princess leans more heavily into gay ballroom culture with the next album, ditching the acoustic guitar for music that’s more urgent and funky, then we might just have another pop great on our hands.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Cry
    Second album ‘Cry’ sees the band not stray too far from proven formula of slow and sexy sadness, but this time with a little more love thrown in and all held together by a more filmic approach.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, there’s enough rock star swagger here to live vicariously through, and the sense that the Joshua Tree party will ride again for years to come. So crack open that fancy bottle and let your hair down.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sure, it’s not as relentless as 2015’s ‘The Monsanto Years’ – his concept album about the evils of the monolithic, genetically modifying agriculture business – but his commitment to a better way of doing things seeps through each of the 10 songs here.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Summer Walker paints in subtler shades. This is an album of relatable, mixed emotions, the narrator promiscuous one minute and faithful the next. This is record of complex emotions, treated with a lightness of touch that ensures it’s fun as fuck. We’re far from ‘Over It’.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Not only a fittingly accomplished conclusion to their most adventurous and masterful project to date, ‘Part 2’ is also a thoroughbred belter of a record and utterly complete album in its own right. Add it all up and the ‘Everything Not Lost’ era is testament to all that Foals are capable of – in sound, in scope and in greatness.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    War Music is the best album Refused have ever made. It has more in common with the violent swing of a sledgehammer than any punk record we’ve heard this year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She’s combined the joy of Chairlift, the atmospheric mastery of Ramona Lisa and the experimentalism of CEP. The result is a Caroline Polachek record in its most distilled and fully realised form.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though there is plenty of positive change across ‘Surviving’, it’s clear that their strengths still lie as a fists-in-the-air rock band; the monumental ‘One Mil’ shows this best.f hope and rebirth in their own way, digging as deep as Adkins himself is.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the guests form a great deal of the fabric of the album, they do so on Battles’ terms, firmly entering their universe. No guest – not even Shabazz Palaces’ flowing verses on ‘Izm’ – steals the show. ... An album – that indulges the weird and wonderful side of Battles while also, simply, giving the people what they want.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    From the brief flamenco break in the pummelling ‘Night Night Burn’ and the doomy guttural rumblings of ‘In The Name Of’ to the horns-up thrash anthemics of ‘Distortion’, ‘Metal Galaxy’ is a wild ride that, through its sheer energy, is somehow infectiously accessible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Uneasy and scratchy, and powered by hefty beats from producer Justin Raisen, ‘No Home Record’ is a restless listen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A wide-eyed, serotonin rush of an album that will make you eternally grateful for Swim Deep’s perseverance.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Ghosteen is one of the most devastatingly accurate accounts of grief that you’ll ever listen to. Yet it’s also, astoundingly, one of the most comforting. Few mediations on grief manage to navigate despair and catharsis as well as this.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ode to Joy is the culmination of a musical evolution Wilco have been working towards for years. Ode to Joy holds a microscope to the small moments of life – which, thanks to the current political landscape, we’re often in danger of missing – and encourages us to see and cherish them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This peek into FEET’s trippy world is a often confounding, but on the whole this album is a giddy ride from a British band not afraid to push the boundaries of their own sanity – and, quite possibly, your own.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s tempting to say that ‘Deceiver’ truly excels at its heaviest, given that these moments – the pitiless, piledriving chorus of ‘For The Guilty’; the heaving last gasp of feedback that roars through ‘Acheron’ – are the record’s most memorable. But it’s actually the more fragile moments on ‘Deceiver’ that ultimately prove to be the most emotionally resonant.