New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 5,112 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 No Tourists
Lowest review score: 0 Everybody Wants To Be On TV
Score distribution:
5112 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A departure from their scrappy origins, this record is a big, grown-up collection of forward-thinking rock gems. Sure, it might not be as chaotic or feel as grimy as what’s come before, but it’s a deliberately larger-than-life affair.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    ‘Such Pretty Forks…’ might not be flawless, but in that way, it’s true to Morissette’s depiction of life – something that’s often messy and tough, but worth sticking with.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As well as weighty statements, there is a sense of closure here.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brave, ambitious and nuanced album that looks to lead the band’s fans down the rabbit hole on a new, macabre adventure. Turning their backs on their punk roots was a gamble, but it’s paid off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s not something you’ll be hankering to press play on repeatedly. Not that it’s bad music: excuse the pretension, but it really is an experience; one that would lend itself better to accompanying Jaar’s physical art installations than a standard album listen.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In aiming to examine the self rather than please others, Fontaines D.C. have exerted a knack for writing anthems that are at once self-excoriating and intimately relatable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Free I.H.’ is a wild ride of cathartic outpourings, big declarations and the freedom to do whatever they want. Weighed down by the struggle but relishing their victory, it’s a record that offers conflict and comfort.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Folklore’ feels fresh, forward-thinking and, most of all, honest. The glossy production she’s lent on for the past half-decade is cast aside for simpler, softer melodies and wistful instrumentation. It’s the sound of an artist who’s bored of calculated releases and wanted to try something different.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout the five tracks, Walker’s lyrics never feel anthemic. Rather, they are personal, almost as if she’s right there with you. Her words are a balm: comforting advice of an old friend through a Zoom call.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musing on the break-up of a nine-year-long romantic relationship, simplicity is key to ‘Old Flowers’’ innate grace.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While they’re not bringing anything musically innovative to the table, they’ve re-packaged the sounds in a way that feels distinctly 21st Century. It’s extremely good fun and presented without pretence – and that feels like enough.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Pain Olympics’ is a disturbing, joyous, cataclysmic listen that travels from claustrophobia and fear into wide-eyed expressions of joy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Love + Light’ feels like it soundtracks your entire night out – from your first steps into the club to arriving home after hours of raving.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is arguably Cocker’s best work since Pulp’s 1998 comedown record ‘This Is Hardcore’ and certainly a greatly promising start to his new chapter. Cocker remains in an entirely different class.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Lianne La Havas’ is a far more cohesive record than any of its predecessors, focused around a primary nucleus of intimate vocals, nimble guitar-work and driving percussion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The first quarter of the album is a soothing ode to an immense talent gone too soon. But soon the record starts to sprawl and spiral.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Ghost Inside’s self-titled, fifth album is a towering statement of positivity, transforming pain into catharsis, determination and hope.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By spotlighting upcoming artists alongside established names, 100 Gecs give an IRL boost to their ever-expanding community of internet collaborators on ‘1000 Gecs & the Tree of Clues’ while providing an exhilarating snapshot of pop’s alternative future.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The irony of ‘Jump Rope Gazers’ is that as The Beths push themselves to do something different for album number two, they actually end up with the sonic sameness that the first record miraculously avoided. Only now do they sound like they could just be any other band.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully produced and filled with honest, unrefined conversations about love, life and sacrifices, ‘6pc Hot’ sees 6lack shoot straight from the heart. Even though it’s just a taster, it puts the Atlanta crooner in prime position to take over as the leader of R&B’s new school.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A bold step forward that sees DMA’s coming into their own, it’s a two-fingered salute to anyone that sneers at the idea of trying something new.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘None of Us Are Getting Out Of This Life Alive’ isn’t just a testament to Mike Skinner’s intriguing evolution but also proof of his keen eye for curation. It’s good to have him back – and all of his mates, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A tighter and more compact project would have elevated some of the album’s more enlightening moments, but, when taken as a whole, ‘Modern Dread’ ultimately disappoints.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Shoot For The Stars, Aim For The Moon’ showcases a multi-faceted artist only just discovering his potential. What makes the album truly stand out is that it serves as a testament to the strength, power and knowledge Smoke held in his ambition to go to the very top.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Amends’ is a powerful record that offers comfort, motivation and a sense of belonging.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With so much honesty packed into the 11 tracks, the album is an invitation and a challenge to go after what you want – without apologising for it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A glorious and human introduction, this is without doubt a modern-day shoegaze classic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nelson’s [voice] still boasts a lightness of touch. He might be a soulful elder statesman, but there’s a perkiness to his version of cult outlaw songwriter Billy Joe Shaver’s 1981 track ‘We Are The Cowboys’, which celebrates the multiculturalism of the American cowboy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It might not be quite the experimental opus you feel Weller’s still holding back, but that feels a churlish complaint when the songs are this well-written. There’s a lightness of touch and a tenderness at ‘On Sunset”s heart.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The band artfully showcase their musical knowledge to create a project which marks a clear distinction for the largely instrumental band. With ‘Mordechai’, Khruangbin have at once expanded their horizons while rooting their latest project in a sound they’ve made their own.