DIY Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,162 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Dirty Computer
Lowest review score: 20 The Atlas Underground
Score distribution:
2162 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Self-produced and largely self-performed, Vagabon celebrates her heritage and her community, but most of all her creative freedom to challenge musical boundaries and to break away from the norm.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ideal meeting of brains and brawn over a journey that manages to feel both concise and exploratory.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Channeling everyone from Talking Heads to ESG, BODEGA remain as giddy and funked-up as ever. And on this highly danceable new addition they barely make a mis-step.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As you’d expect, there are bleeps and bloops aplenty, but underneath it all is a sexy, if slightly bizarre, groove.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    ENSWBL, Part 2 picks up the baton of its predecessor and sends it surging to the finish line, leaving Foals legions ahead of their competitors.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s all hips, handclaps and riffs, lots and lots of riffs. It isn’t perfect, but you’d be hard pressed to find a record as fun as Devour You.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a strange, industrial trip that’s full of experimentation. Kim’s signature vocal style - a kind of husky, gasping whisper - is as recognisable as ever, though. And like with the best moments of her career, here she is uncompromising in her artistic vision.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A restrained pace imbues the album with a feeling of deep sedation. It’s a blissful listen from start to finish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Doubling as perhaps his most creative and experimental sound so far – swapping the more organic instrumentation of previous records for warm, electronic soundscapes - it stands an album which feels distinctly profound in both its lyrics and musicianship.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With their sixth studio album they bolster an already impressive catalogue with intricate explorations of the self in an ever-shifting world, accepting the inevitability of change and offering the solace of a shared community to an always-growing fan base.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, you yearn for a little more grit among all the blissed-out euphoria, but ultimately the hooks are big enough to sink in and take hold.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beneath the slightly grating kookiness, FEET's songwriting is genuinely exciting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Deceiver is his first truly clear-eyed artistic statement - it’s also his most mature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In a world of diminishing attention spans, he keeps it moving - most tracks don’t linger longer than 3 minutes, giving the whole thing an inherently vital quality, a record you can let wash over you just as well as getting the party lit.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hey, I’m Just Like You is a record underpinned by raw emotion, melancholy, and a quiet but clear sense of hope, making for one of the group’s most vital efforts yet.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hot Motion’s only pitfall comes from frankly how safe it feels. Sure, it’s bigger and brighter than anything Temples have done before, but its whole aesthetic is still nestled deep in their sepia-tinted comfort zone. ... Nevertheless, it’s a solid statement that Temples are alive and kicking, drawing fresh inspo from the past without fading into it themselves.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s testament to their skill and commitment that it all hangs together so well. What could brush off as mere novelty instead thrives as an almost unique ability to mix anything and everything within arms reach. By being almost completely unrestrained and unmoderated ‘The Talkies’ can exist in its rawest and most vital form.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes ‘A Picture of Good Health’ so vital is the unshakable sense that the gestation of LIFE’s firebrand formula has run parallel to the country’s political spiral. Now, they’re hitting their stride just as the Brexit void looms. Accordingly, this record is indispensable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The guitars are still awash in reverb, the percussion remains propulsive, and the deceptively complex vocal harmonisation is the axis around which everything else revolves. What’s new is a feeling of genuine exhilaration - on the freewheeling standout ‘Something to Do’, the infuriatingly catchy ‘I’m Far Away’, and on the gentle breeze of ‘At It Again’ especially. ‘Memory’, is music for the love of it, and unabashedly so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, single ‘Shockwave’ and ‘Be Still’ plod slightly, but Liam’s second is a whole lot more sentimental. ... Elsewhere, love song ‘Halo’ jams like the ‘Stones’ ‘Let’s Spend The Night Together’, the title track hints at later Weller, and - of course - there’s an unmistakeable Beatles-esque guitar solo on ‘Meadow’. All of which are references welcome to anyone who’s stuck around for Liam’s new stuff.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an album which documents a fierce imagination at play; a truly invigorating piece of work that pushes her songwriting forward.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unexpected, indulgent, and an absolute joy, ‘Metronomy Forever’ is a prophecy to get behind.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it occasionally feels lacking in the kind of explosive energy that made the band such an impact in the late ‘80s, it still captures the spirit of Pixies in a way that’s extremely satisfying.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s still a worthwhile successor to them, of course. It’s just not the world-beater she’s surely capable of.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Fans might see this as a boon - Bainbridge picking up from where they left off before their self-imposed hiatus. To others, it may sound like a missed opportunity to establish themselves as a more cutting-edge artist.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s the uniquely sombre and contemplative Iggy Pop album we didn’t realise we needed.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For the rest of us, Natasha’s first real pop effort since ‘Fur and Gold’ is an impressively lean and infectiously hook-laden romp; doomy disco for dark times.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Adam’s still the pied piper of indie, with a skip in his step and charm for days.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Saves The World carries the same weight as its predecessor, but breaks the dark-pop boundaries the band themselves created with their debut. It’s an exhilarating ode to self-preservation and to being your own number one fan.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their most mature and concise work to date.