DarkZero's Scores

  • Games
For 1,502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Starbound
Lowest review score: 10 Ace Banana
Score distribution:
1502 game reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Joining the roguelite genre is no easy thing to do, since the field is packed with high quality titles as is, and sadly, Katana Kami isn’t quite on par with the best in the business. That is not to say this game is bad, it supplies a decent attempt at the genre with some unique features of its own. Playing in short sessions works best for most fun with its with fast action that incorporates some decent combat mechanics and out of dungeon concepts that aren’t sadly capitalised to their fullest, nor can the randomised dungeon design keep the repetitiveness away from eventually creeping in. So in the end, there are some shortcomings – I still cannot get over the lack of supporting 1440p resolution – but Katana Kami: A Way of the Samurai Story does about a enough to warrant been a fair entry in the genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s nothing outright bad about Conglomerate 451. If you want a dungeon crawler with this specific motif and you’re okay with a less than stellar underlying game that for all intents and purposes gets the job done, this should fit that bill. It gets the atmosphere right and there’s plenty to do, and especially for the asking price, what’s on offer here is not unreasonable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The name might be generic, and sure, the game is not exactly doing anything new for the genre as a whole, but Rebellion has made sure its series got the improvements it required – the level themes, great feeling gun combat, and plenty of content to beat – to take it to the next step to deliver something extremely fun and enjoyable to play, to the point where I feel the series has jumped up a notch from being good fun to a great bit of entertainment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Super Crush KO is a short burst of fun that is priced well for what you get, but its simple level design and lack of building on the combat system make this a title I grew out of after a few short hours of play.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When all is said and done, SaGa: Scarlet Grace: Ambitions proves why the franchise is often overlooked in favor of its more familiar RPG cousins. The battle system requires much trial and error, and many optional scenarios, party members and outcomes may be skipped over entirely due to the extra challenges they offer for newcomers. Yet there is no denying the dense amount of strategic systems to play around with as well as the massive amounts of replayability thanks to its multiple characters and outcomes. Patient gamers will be rewarded with an RPG experience that is both familiar and fresh at the same time, not to mention another hundred hours to sink into the Switch as it continues to be the ultimate haven for the genre.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The premise for Bee Simulator is good, and I like the idea of doing education through video games in such a uniquely refreshing way, but the execution here has problems. When the game is not asking much from the player, then Bee Simulator ends up being somewhat fun with a great sense of scale, but the controls hamper such an important part of the game that the experience ends up being frustrating. Throw in repetitive tasks and muddy visuals and what you have is a video game that sadly does not deliver on its potential. It is hard to recommend Bee Simulator out right, especially at its asking price, but some of the younger kids might enjoy what Bee Simulator has to offer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sublevel Zero Redux has helped remind us that 6DOF gameplay is something that should return in bigger bulk, and fans that enjoy games like Descent will see things here to relish – tight controls, fluid movement and the challenge. The small issues with Sublevel Zero Redux come with its procedurally-generated and roguelite elements, mainly the former, where levels are not as engaging as they could be, and so its down to the punchy, fun combat and the constant supply of improved weapons to keep the game engaging until the end of its multi-campaign, rather than staying after it is over to improve runs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mistakes, creature deaths and restarts are likely to happen here to gain the most out of Planet Zoo, but like real life, no one really magically makes a fantastic zoo on their first go, and with the lessons learned from Jurassic Park Evolution, Frontier Developments has made Planet Zoo a better game than its dinosaur filled predecessor, and is by far the best zoo management/builder you can play today.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though it may require a bit of patience to get to the sweet stuff, Atelier Ryza is a wholesome and addicting experience that RPG fans will gleefully gulp down, even if they’ve never dabbled with the Atelier franchise before. Thanks to the strong visuals and countless gameplay features, now is the best time to jump in on this niche series, which may end up becoming much more recognizable thanks to this latest solid entry.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, Little Big Workshop is a relaxing play for people who enjoy the genre, outside of that it might be a little too off-putting for some people unfamiliar with this type of simulation game, especially with all the number crunching. Aesthetically, it’s very pleasing – I gained enjoyment watching my the little workers do their business around the workshop. For anyone who has a head for numbers or just want to try out a different simulation game, I can recommend giving Little Big Workshop the green light to go ahead with it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Angry Birds Movie 2 VR: Under Pressure ignores the traditional Angry Birds gameplay and goes for something that works more suited for playing with friends. The developers have seen what asymmetrical gameplay can deliver through VR and by merging gameplay ideas from other titles on the market gives it a solid foundation. The way the game includes a variety of mechanics that evolve with each level helps bring an impressive amount of challenge to the game, but still remains a fun and hectic cooperative experience with delightful VR thrown in for good measure to bring its own identity of madness and joy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For better or worse, The Alliance Alive is the very definition of a mid-tier RPG. The visuals and story fall under the line of “good enough” that they don’t necessarily have to aim for greater heights, while the content is practically bursting with customizable features and mechanics that will drive stat-lovers into a joyous frenzy, even though the time it takes to reach to the juicy center is a bit on the long side. It’s an overall solid experience and yet another badge to pin on the Nintendo Switch for its outstanding service of the RPG genre.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    GRID, as it stands then, is Codemasters delivering what it does best, exciting and superb racing that anyone can pickup and play, but spoiled by shortcomings to its content and online.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Generally, unless you’re incredibly interested in the spectacular visuals, I can’t recommend Trüberbrook. It feels half-made with large sections being completely disjointed from the plot and rooms, that no doubt took someone a ridiculous amount of time to design, build-out, and paint, having nothing in them, even when it’s abundantly clear that they should have. Perhaps cuts were made to meet a budget or tight Kickstarter deadlines but instead of having a lean 3-4 hour game that shows off what it does best, it drags on for around 6 with a lot of stiff backtracking and filler.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the end, Fight’N Rage can’t escape its short run-time which is prominent with every Beat ‘Em Up game (they were originally created to serve as short Arcade experiences, after all), but the branching story paths, combo-heavy characters and numerous unlockable extras more than make up a full package filled with incentives to keep playing. As a modern throwback to Arcade classics, Fight ‘N Rage is one of the very best in the business right now.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Torchlight II was a great action RPG back in 2012 and it still remains it to this day. Everything I enjoyed about it still holds true now, and of course, that is also the same with the negatives, plus with the lack of local same Switch cooperative play is a bummer. Still, this is a superb port by Panic Button that the minor niggles should not put you off, because Torchlight II‘s addictive dungeon crawling action is a wonderful fit for the Nintendo Switch, even if you already own Diablo III: Eternal Collection.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For those who enjoyed the storytelling of Zero Escape and other works by Kotaro Uchikoshi, AI: The Somnium Files is a no-brainer purchase, and might just be his most solid game yet. Even if the random bits of humor and cringeworthy risque dialog might prove a detractor for some, the strongest story beats stand out completely unhindered along with the cast of characters and the fascinating near-futuristic setting, not quite as dystopian as other futuristic police stories, but every bit as engaging and thought-provoking.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I went into Ion Fury not expecting much from it, but after finishing the game, I can easily say I bloody loved my time spent with Shelly. Voidpoint has managed to bring to life a retro shooter that takes a beloved style and rigorously craft something so spot-on, so perfectly 90s, but doing so without hampering the experience. The superb and frantic action, well-thought level design and brutal weaponry all play a part in coming together to offer a joyous single player campaign.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    They Are Billions' crucible of experimentation and failure molds players into rugged survivalists. The RTS-style resource management and tower defense test the ability to aptly devote time to the bare necessities that will fend off countless hordes of undead. Harder to master console controls may add an extra layer of tension but living another day remains the sweetest of rewards.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pawarumi is a solid shoot ’em up in both challenge and its creative design. The sci-fi Aztec-infused presentation is refreshing, while taking inspiration from Ikaruga and throwing in their own inventive twist on the formula helps give Pawarumi its own flavour. It might be too hard for the casual fan, since there is no way to continue on death – it is key to learn Pawarumi‘s distinct Trinity Mechanic system to survive, but spending time doing so is rewarding. Pawarumi doesn’t have the final polish and tightly knitted gameplay that Treasure’s black and white gem does that could have pushed it to the kings of the genre – this comes with experience crafting games in the genre, which Treasure has mountains of – but shoot ’em up fans will have a blast as they try chase down the world champions on the leaderboard.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It might not be the best version of Slay the Spire, but it’s the only one you can take on the go at the moment, being ensnared in its fun, rewarding gameplay, which can lead to missing a bus stop or two on the way to work without feeling all that bad about it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In the end, Mini-Mech Mayhem‘s charming aesthetic might win kids over, but whether or not they’ll have the patience for the tedious controls and length of matches is another thing entirely. The concept of a strategy game playing out on a virtual board is an intriguing one, but like many PSVR experiments, this one fails to execute its ambitious concepts effectively, much less create an alternative experience to traditional console-based strategy games played with a controller.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the end, Trover Saves The Universe is an adequate-playing videogame that is defined by its style of humor. If anyone reading is on the fence, the best thing to do would be to check out Rick and Morty, as it is the easiest (and cheapest) way to determine if that type of comedy is appealing to the individual or not, the same way the recent South Park games also rely on the writing and wit of its source material. For fans of the series, this game is an absolute no-brainer and is just about the funniest videogame released in a long while.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Persona Q2: New Cinema Labyrinth might not be the best RPG on the Nintendo 3DS, but it is a fitting sayonara for what could be debatable as one of Nintendo’s best handheld systems.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the end, I can’t help but feel Warhammer: Chaosbane suffers from being a budget action RPG, taking shortcuts to save cost, which has caused the game to succumb to the issue of being rather unoriginal, uninspiring and repetitive. When games such as Path of Exile and Diablo III can keep hold of their players with great gameplay loops, Warhammer: Chaosbane trips over trying to do this, with only the Warhammer licence helping it offer some sort of original design. Things can change with updates, and maybe this will happen to Warhammer: Chaosbane, but right now, while the game isn’t bad, it just doesn’t do anything great in any category, leaving it to be a rather run-of-the-mill dungeon crawler that will probably make you bored soon after it ends with its recurring level and enemy designs.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Undead Horde may not be the most beautiful or impressive game in the market, but it surely is as fun as hell, difficult at times, but silly in others.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark is an easy recommendation for anyone who loves playing Japanese tactical role-playing games. It has no shame in displaying its inspiration on its sleeve, mainly because it takes that inspiration and wears it proud, refining the gameplay with its own spin on it. With many difficulty options featured here that opens up the genre to many people, there really is no reason to not check out Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark, and with a lovely 32-bit throwback presentation, there is a tasty meal here that is full of heart and love for the genre.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Close to the Sun is one game I can still recommend for anyone who enjoys these slower type of adventure games. It won’t be the best atmospheric game you have come across, and I feel it’s a title that only needs to be played once, but that doesn’t stop the game from offering a fascinating setting and dazzling atmosphere.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Shakedown: Hawaii energizes its open-world satire with the transparent and ruthless cynicism of modern commerce. Its antihero’s flagrant and invincible dishonesty would go beyond parody if it weren’t kept in check by the player’s underhanded complicity. I want the money numbers to go higher, too. And I’ll destroy or ruin anyone in Shakedown: Hawaii’s lush pixel paradise to see it through.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Saints Row: The Third was a sacred moment in time where lunatics reimagined the animus of an open-world crime game. It enabled players to thunderously lead a prestigious gang of miscreants and also turn themselves into a toilet. Eight years later Saints Row: The Third’s glut of Content is more difficult to digest, but its outrageous ambience is (mostly) still so sweet.

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