AllMusic's Scores

  • Music
For 14,371 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Appetite for Destruction: Super Deluxe Edition [Box Set]
Lowest review score: 20 The Truth Is...
Score distribution:
14371 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's a slight de-emphasis on his lyrical genius, but that's fine. It's clear that Ronnie Wood & His Wild Five love playing this music and that palpable joy makes Mad Lad a fine time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All My Heroes Are Cornballs manages a mellow, even reserved instrumental tone without losing any of the scathing social commentary or frenetic energy that defined earlier work. If anything, the album is more intense, hiding biting and bilious (and often surreal) lyrical threats beneath a deceptively low-energy facade.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Both polished and revealing, New Age Norms, Vol. 1 reflects how Cold War Kids continue to broaden their horizons.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Easily surpassing a thematic exercise, 2019 has some essential original material by Dacus -- particularly "My Mother & I" -- and a handful of covers that are bound to provide a lasting preferred version (or two) for fans.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In Hatfield's hands, the songs of Sting and the Police don't necessarily sound like hits -- nor are they performed with the technical proficiency of Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland -- but they sound fresh and alive, once again feeling like punk-inspired pop.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Ruinism, Amnioverse is an ambitious, striking record that seems to assess the entirety of existence, and it's hard not to feel moved by it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album offers a lighter and mellower reading of Bonnie "Prince" Billy as he walks further down a perpetually twisting path with each new set of songs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The elements are familiar, but Hawkins assembles fuzz guitars, glam beats, New Wave synths, and operatic harmonies with flair and wit, turning Get the Money into a giddy journey to the past that's remarkably devoid of nostalgia.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Thirst's generous length means it meanders occasionally, it gives SebastiAn plenty of room to show how much he's grown since the early 2010s. Even if his music has slowed down, it's not standing still.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The seven tracks represent different, curious branches extending out from the seeds planted by Some Rap Songs, each reaching for new ideas and switching gears when another thought arrives. It continues Sweatshirt's streak as an innovator and as one of the more compelling artists of his time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their earlier recordings were all top-notch indie rock, worthy of all the Omni comparisons that were flung their way. Junior is Corridor's coming-of-age party, and now Omni might have to work a little harder to keep up with them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are some glitchy electronic beats and questionable structural turns during the album's back half that feel a little bit out of place, but the overall vibe remains one of deep and heavy existential pain. Wave is an acutely overcast album, but Watson's gift for melody, narrative lucidity, and retro-pop sensibilities help to keep things more melancholic than maudlin.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In revisiting the traditional directly, and investing it with such a disciplined application of freedom, Xylouris White's The Sisypheans is their most compelling record to date.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What You See Is What You Get is a solid album, proudly made just the way they used to back in the 1990s.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At once more delicate and more concentrated than any of her previous work, Magdalene is a testament to the strength and skill it takes to make music this fragile and revealing. Like the dancer she is, Barnett pushes through pain in pursuit of beauty and truth, and the leaps she makes are breathtaking.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A Son may be a return to Nelson's roots, but it still fits snugly within his catalog of spacious meditations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The tracks do an excellent job at establishing a mood, but a lot of them don't particularly go anywhere. Leaving meaning. is a decent album, but ultimately it sounds like a sort of reset or palate cleanser that will hopefully lead up to something greater.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kiwanuka stands head and shoulders above it as a complex, communicative, poetic, and sometimes even profound collection that wears its heart on its sleeve and its sophistication in its grooves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At times, Le Bon and Cox hit on something entertaining or interesting, but it's far from essential work from two of the best songwriters of their era.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Altogether is perhaps the lightest and most pop-oriented release in the band's canon, doubling down on bright guitar tones and jazzy chord voicings, and relying even more heavily on lush synth parts to augment their sound. While its feather-soft tone flirts with the smooth banality of easy listening, parts of the album are far more clever and well-structured than first impressions might suggest.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is anything but bombastic, and there's much greater attention paid to intricacies and subtle details than before. The arrangements consist of calm, patient pianos, gently swelling strings, and deftly integrated modular synthesizers, which help the pieces glow and vibrate. It's a vast, involved recording, but it doesn't bowl the listener over with heavy-handed sentimentality. Nevertheless, if certain pieces catch you at the right moment, they can be tear-jerkers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taken on an individual basis, each track is clever and playful, yet the cumulative effect of Wildcard is ever so slightly slight, a possible side effect of an album meant to be nothing but a party. Perhaps that may mean that Wildcard isn't as emotionally resonant as some of Lambert's other records, but there's no denying she's delivered exactly what she intended with this album: It's one hell of a good time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As elegant as they are, the melodies don't easily lodge in the subconscious, but the bigger problem is that the production -- by Lynne, who plays virtually every note on the record -- is airless and precise. This dryness is a remnant of the digital age, where every element in a recording is exactly in the right place, and if it's not quite a drawback, it does mean From out of Nowhere can be a bit of an uncanny valley: it's close enough to a genuine item to satisfy, yet different enough to disarm.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At a time when a great album from Neil Young would have been more than welcome, Colorado is instead a good one, but it's recognizably the work of a great artist, and that's more than can be said of the last few offerings Young has given us.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Punching with more focus and power, by the time the last note fades they emerge from the ring with the post-punk revival title belt slung around their triumphant shoulders.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A sleepier song like "Blue Spring," which features pedal steel and sparse, strummed guitar, only provides contrast within a very narrow range of expression here, like when eyes adjust to dim nocturnal lighting, then notice the shadow of a stray moth.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If the results aren't epochal, they're nevertheless illuminating, revealing how these two American icons shared the same musical vocabulary.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a clear and focused return to the peaks the band found in the mid-2000s, and as enjoyable a listen as the best of their work.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All the added instrumental layering and effects -- wriggling synthesizers, buzzing basslines, ricocheting percussion, apparition-like vocal processing, and suchlike -- are nuanced, not once getting in the way of a musician who can put forth an affecting message with just her voice and violin.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On a Clear Day feels like Lindstrøm going back to basics, while also starting a new chapter of his career.