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Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics What's this?

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Generally favorable reviews- based on 10 Ratings

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  • Summary: The latest full-length solo release for the punk artist includes contributions from Noveller and Leron Thomas.
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Top Track

James Bond
She wants to be your James Bond She wants to be your James Bond Well, it's not for a price and it's not to be nice She wants to be your James... See the rest of the song lyrics
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
  1. Sep 6, 2019
    90
    It’s the uniquely sombre and contemplative Iggy Pop album we didn’t realise we needed.
  2. ‘Free’ is a liberating collection that unshackles the star from his past and his insecurities, and slowly cracks open a door to version of the future that will inevitably arrive when he’s ready. Wherever that journey takes him in this phase of his career, it’ll be an honour to witness.
  3. Sep 6, 2019
    80
    As a detour from rock & roll, Free is a fine and compelling study of the mind and mood of Iggy Pop at the age of 72, and if it's clearly the work of an older artist, that works to its favor, a pointed contrast to the abandon of his youth but with no less gravitas.
  4. Sep 6, 2019
    70
    Freedom to Pop, at least on this album, is a certain restrained swagger. The guitars simmer, never boil. The bass swells, and the keyboards shimmer behind him. And all the while, Pop flexes his baritone, expressing himself more clearly than perhaps ever before.
  5. 67
    It’s a late-career entry that can’t hold up to his priceless back catalog, but it’s also the work of a guy who at this point really couldn’t give a shit what people think. You’ll enjoy some tracks and soldier through others. But Iggy’s still here, and maybe that’s the most important takeaway of all.
  6. 60
    True to quixotic form, Free doesn’t build on the success of that record [2016’s Post Pop Depression], Iggy veering off at yet another tangent, courtesy of avant garde guitarist Noveller, aka Sarah Lipstate, and jazz trumpeter Leron Thomas.
  7. Sep 3, 2019
    40
    Unfortunately, for all but the hardcore, Free seems to baffle as much as it bewitches.

See all 18 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 3
  2. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Sep 7, 2019
    9
    Instantly I fell in love with "Loves Missing" - a great well crafted work with Iggy`s superb voice and groovy chilled style again.
  2. Sep 8, 2019
    8
    On Iggy's latest we hear him crooning around some minimalist tunes bolstered by a gorgeous trumpet. It comes across as though the music cameOn Iggy's latest we hear him crooning around some minimalist tunes bolstered by a gorgeous trumpet. It comes across as though the music came first and Iggy then slipped in some lyrics. Iggy croons well, his voice has matured and ripened over the years and he uses it here to essentially read poetry over some jazzy sounding tunes. It's not his usual fare, but then did Iggy ever have usual fare? He has survived this long and come this far. Think of this as a quiet Coda. Hypnotic and seductive. Only 33 minutes, but enjoyable nonetheless. Expand
  3. Sep 8, 2019
    6
    This is not a bad record but it lacks a clear direction. The fact Iggy Pop worked with Leron Thomas could make you think it's a a jazz recordThis is not a bad record but it lacks a clear direction. The fact Iggy Pop worked with Leron Thomas could make you think it's a a jazz record but it's not. There is a new-wave song, "Loves Missing", which is probably the best track on this record. There are a few fun albeit goofy tunes like "James Bond" and "Dirty Sanchez". And then, there's the whole B-side, which is almost entirely filled with ambient, jazzy soundscapes and spoken work. Iggy Pop reads Lou Reed's and Dylan Thomas' texts and you can't really go wrong with that sort of material but, ultimately, the entire record feels half-baked, the music having been insufficiently labored. It sounds like Iggy recording a podcast for NPR or the BBC rather than a full-fledged record. Maybe it's the sort of recreation he needed after the tenser Post Pop Depression but, ultimately, it feels like an underachievement after that beast of a record. For fans of the jazzy Iggy, I'd advise you to go back to the excellent Avenue B. Expand