Sonia Saraiya

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For 52 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sonia Saraiya's Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 95 Fleabag: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 Insatiable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 52
  2. Negative: 3 out of 52
52 tv reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    While illustrating his psyche, the show refuses to minimize Joe/Will’s actions, either. And in this season, as in the last, our antihero desires to be better, even though he can never quite manage it. As his life spirals out of control again, You challenges us with his good intentions, his troubled past, and his endless need to be loved.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    There is, empirically, way too much going on. But Truth Be Told is romp, albeit kind of a gory one. The story is ridiculous, and gloriously so. ... It can be a bit much, but the show earns it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Nostalgic wish fulfillment carries the show further than it has any right to—but it’s not enough to make eight episodes cohere into a season, or for three seasons to cohere into a story. ... Maisel’s greatest character is none of the series regulars. It’s Luke Kirby’s take on real-life comedy great Lenny Bruce.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The season makes for a less sexy, more studied viewing experience. The first half of the season, which focuses on political skirmishes in the late ‘60s, is especially slow going. ... The new cast is impressive, but The Crown has lost a bit of its verve.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    If you love watching a bunch of armored space soldiers shooting at each other with blasters, you’ll have nothing to complain about. But—sans history, motivation, or facial expressions—it rings a bit hollow, lacking the achingly human element of the Star Wars universe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s an intensely faithful adaptation of the books, in a way that tends to bog down the suspense and pace of the story. ... The adaptation is, as a result, flatter and more conventional than the book deserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    To be sure, Peak Content has demonstrated a bit too much fondness for the “[notable figure], but cool” dramatic premise, which has yielded both hits (Riverdale) and bombs (remember Will?). But Dickinson has so much to imagine about Emily—and such a sense of humor—that the idea feels fresh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Essays are round pegs, and episodes are square holes; few installments of Modern Love carry enough dramatic heft or character work to be worth the effort, and none retain what is so lovely and sharp-edged about the prose that inspired them.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The show is so ambitious, with its multiple timelines, storytelling structures, and perspectives, that it’s perpetually surprising.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s something hot, heady, and transporting about this fantasy of shared rule—a world full of treasures ready for the taking, a woman in charge, and a man who adores her without hesitation. ... Catherine the Great reframes her desire as part of her glory—and revels in that glory, without asking too many awkward questions
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Ultimately, the world is much more interesting than the spree of murders within it, or the love story, such as it is, between Philo and Vinny. Carnival Row has built a fascinating metaphor for colonial power, resettlement, and migration—but doesn't quite know what to do with all that raw material.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    The first 20-ish minutes are the most honest work Ansari has done, a litany of observations about the status quo that reveals a hunger and frustration that was buried under his happy-go-lucky persona. ... There’s a bit of flab, especially in the back half. ... But whatever soul-searching or image management that Ansari has gone through since the babe.net story has made him a better performer—one who is more able to dwell in gray areas of comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Based on how wonky and uneven the tone is this season, it feels as if Stranger Things has no idea how to raise its emotional stakes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Season seven is the most satisfying it’s been in years because the story gets the chance to lay itself to rest. It’s the same show, but tweaked and trimmed, well-oiled and screwed-down, to a few major relationships in a few essential places.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Specificity might have helped Euphoria be less provocative—these aren’t your kids, they’re some kids—but frankly, that would have been besides the point. Euphoria wants to provoke. That’s what the cool kids do.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Not since The Sopranos has an HBO show been so attuned to the grace notes of excessive privilege.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    What struck me most were not the tragedies of Deadwood: The Movie, but instead its indelible joys: the humanity that refuses to be stifled and shut away, even in this hardscrabble existence.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    Tuca and Bertie is similarly messy, weird, and loving [as Broad City]—and has the advantage of living in a world without rules. It’s a little terrifying—but full of possibility, too.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Ramy is an earnest exploration of Muslim identity that at times runs toward saccharine; one gets the impression that the show, mindful that the mere act of being Muslim in America is provocative, has carefully neutered itself of anger. But Ramy makes up for this with an unflinching, transgressive portrait of American Islam, one that holds both its traditions and its deviations from tradition in the same embrace. With squirming detail, Ramy pays attention to the bodies of its characters.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 95 Sonia Saraiya
    Throughout this magnificent second season, Fleabag buzzes with life. The characters are so well-drawn, and the performers so skillful, that each frame is resonant with their interpersonal friction—and laden with their unspoken shame.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 95 Sonia Saraiya
    A painfully beautiful eight-hour experience, bewitching in its loveliness and diversity even as it agitates, relentlessly, for human action against climate change.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Fennell’s Killing Eve maintains the show’s sardonic tone and biting edge; there’s a hint of hysterical laughter at the edge of every scene.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Even though Season 5 may not officially be the final season of the sitcom, by the end of the tepid journey, it feels as if the whole production has given up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    For a certain kind of viewer, this show is riveting. It capitalizes on the dread of the disobedient daughter, attempting to grow under an umbrella of disapproval. But the strongest element of the show is not the act—not the performance of illness—but the violent relationship between the two leads, when they have dropped all their pretenses and affectations.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    The unique excellence of the second season, at least in the three episodes released to critics, is how adroitly Hader and co-creator Alec Berg find ways to raise the stakes for Barry while keeping the show’s tone darkly amused.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    This Twilight Zone fulfills all the basic requirements of competence, but seems to have a limited ability to improve upon, or engage with, the deep-seated anxieties of the original.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sonia Saraiya
    The laughter in the series is abrupt, nervous, and sometimes even gleeful. Someone becomes a punch line here, but it isn’t Lorena Bobbitt.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Leaving Neverland brings the voices of alleged victims into the space you live in, which is an indelible feeling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 65 Sonia Saraiya
    The Case Against Adnan Syed may present more facts, but it has less to offer in the way of deeper, broader truth.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    A rom-com should, by its very nature, be fun and light without sinking too deep into heavy material; a rom-com can tell a satisfying story in just 90 tight minutes. And it’s easier to build a rom-com around a partially formed character than it is to build a TV show around one—because a rom-com seeks only a happy ending.

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