Sheila O'Malley

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For 336 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sheila O'Malley's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Elle
Lowest review score: 0 The Haunting of Sharon Tate
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 336
336 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Shia LaBeouf wrote the script, and based it on his own childhood. This means he is, in essence, playing his own father. The performance is so good, so in-the-trenches, it feels like it's an act of channeling rather than mimicry or even imitation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    The look of buried terror and resentment in Hawke's eyes tells the deeper story. Still, Adopt a Highway wanders ("Ella" is just the first chapter) and the redemption narrative isn't so much heavy-handed as it is super-imposed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The golf cart scene is an excellent example of what Greener Grass is attacking, and it's a sharp and subversive critique: it would be great to live in a more civil world, but too much civility leads to golf carts stalled at a four-way intersection.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Sheila O'Malley
    Unfortunately, Mary's concept - and it's a good one! - doesn't blossom into the truly spooky, the truly eerie, even though it's given countless chances to do so.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    Semper Fi is best when it sticks with the journeys of the individual characters, each with their own backstory and struggles. These men have always known each other. But something goes wrong along the way, and Semper Fi suddenly decides it wants to be another kind of movie. The transition doesn't work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Scheinert smartly does not hammer home these themes, or sum things up with a monologue about what we've all learned. We haven't learned anything except ... if you find yourself in Zeke and Earl's situation, do exactly the opposite, start to finish.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    A fascinating and sometimes frustrating film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    Chained for Life is more than a polemic. There's a free-floating absurdist mood established, humorous and self-referential, allowing space for the audience to not just feel, but think. This is no small feat.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    As Danica, the head witch, draped in a bright-red gown with matching lipstick, Rebecca Romjin gives a very perverse and funny performance, all icy intimidation and glamorous power.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Some of the symbolism has the feeling of being laid on top of the narrative. It feels imposed, especially when it goes from subtext to text. You can see it coming from a mile away. But Ms. Purple works because of Chu's performance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    It's a disappointment when so much goes unexplored, when the film bows to the demands of a cliched plot driving the story forward.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Jawline works gently, slowly, presenting its subject and sub-culture with not just affection but sympathy, a sympathy very close to tenderness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Blinded by the Light, at its very best, captures the experience of being a fan, the pure exhilaration of it, and the sense of your vision opening out to vistas beyond your horizon.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Affleck's acting style has always been understated to the point of barely existing. It's why he was riveting in “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford,” in particular. Affleck drifts, he floats through dialogue, he doesn't have words at his easy disposal. This works well for him here.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Cliches aside, there's something at work in The Peanut Butter Falcon, something eccentric and exuberant. Nilson and Schwartz's devotion to the details of Zac's world highlights Gottsagen's funny and intelligent performance, giving the film an authenticity it wouldn't otherwise have.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    The film is filled with brutality from start to finish, over its grueling run-time ("The Nightingale" feels much longer than it is). The Nightingale has already caused controversies at festivals, where people walked out, outraged at the multiple violent rape scenes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The Mountain, with its long stretches of quiet, bleak subject matter, and Alverson's staunch refusal to let us in, or fill in the blanks, creates a genuinely unnerving mood.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    A mostly satisfying entry in the art heist genre.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    Marianne and Leonard turns out to be a rather run-of-the-mill documentary about Cohen's journey, taking us down well-documented paths.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    If nothing else, Danny Boyle's Yesterday, which imagines a world where the Beatles never happened, made me think about what would it be like to hear "Yesterday" for the first time, what life would be like if the Beatles didn't exist. The film, scripted by Richard Curtis, explores some of the implications of its premise, but, frustratingly, skips over others.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    The Quiet One is Wyman's journey, and because of that the documentary is intimate and personal, but by the same token it is also highly selective in what it shows and acknowledges.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    The setup (script by Glen Lakin) is full of wacko screwball potential, some of which is mined, some of which misses the boat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Late Night comes directly from Kaling's own experiences. This is an earnest and funny comedy, with very sharp teeth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Best of all, they haven't sacrificed emotional impact. Mouthpiece is a deeply moving piece of work.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    With a script by Eric C. Charmelo, Nicole Snyder and Shepard, The Perfection has a gory grindhouse sleaze overlaid with the tony gleam of the upper-crust, a very sick combo.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    The film plods at points, trudging along, and there are a few misguided narrative "devices" tacked on, but still, Trial by Fire bristles with anger.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    As an origin story, Tolkien, has its moments of clarity and emotion. Some of it is oversimplified, even misguided. But the film cares about its subject, and cares about finding ways to portray "things that are good and days that are good to spend."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The film does a great job of contextualizing the phenom of Dr. Ruth.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Refusing to explain Ted Bundy is the strongest possible choice Berlinger could have made because it destabilizes reality. The film itself gaslights us, and this is where Berlinger and Zac Efron — an inspired choice—are powerful co-creators.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The rhythm is slow. You really get the sense that when you walk through the doors of Carmine Street Guitars, you step outside of time.

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