Peter Debruge

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For 1,091 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Skyfall
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
1091 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Better late than never, this film is Blank’s shot, and by staying so true to her voice, her aim hits home.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    In the end, Kajillionaire is less about the con than it is the connection, and we’re all the richer as a result.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Many filmmakers mistakenly think that exploiting tragedy is the way to jerk tears from their audience, when in fact, gestures of spontaneous kindness shown by near-strangers can be most moving — something Lloyd understands, boosting the positive energy with anthems like “Chandelier” and “Bulletproof.”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Ironbark’s hook is that it’s based on true events, and the underlying history deserves to be shared.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The movie succeeds in enlightening without ever coming across as an “eat your spinach” civics lesson.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    To get the desired emotional reaction, The Painter and the Thief proves able to deceive in ways that are best discovered for yourself. It works: In a genius final stroke, Ree pulls back to reveal the entire canvas, putting key aspects of this unconventional portrait into startling new perspective.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Sure, it’s fun to see a movie skewer the vapid soullessness of social media and the unregulated economy of male desire, but Zola ultimately rings hollow. The actors are fearless, and yet, how much do we know about these characters in the end? The answer: something of their values, but almost nothing of their lives.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Although the entire film runs just 87 minutes, as Lucky Grandma unspools, Wong’s predicament starts to feel increasingly outlandish, making it difficult for Sealy to sustain the offbeat humor and strong momentum of the opening stretch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Gordon uses blockbuster tools — pairing bold visuals with the kind of thundering sound design that makes your joints rattle — to turn his well-organized sociology lesson into a more visceral cinematic experience. More than just a compelling TED Talk, it’s an urgent and engaging call to action.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    In the end, the story’s custom reenactment gimmick may not even have been necessary, so well-written and executed is the personal journey that underlies it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    All of this makes for compelling dramatic conflict, and it’s satisfying to watch an impostor shake up the status quo. But there’s also a soap opera-like dimension to Corpus Christi that threatens the more thoughtful aspects of the script.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    As audiences, we trust filmmakers to do a reasonably accurate job of representing stories based in truth, and we get angry when they take the kind of liberties Avnet and company allow themselves here. As if it weren’t bad enough that Three Christs were boring, it’s impossible to believe, and for that, there is no cure.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Shinkai hasn’t gone far enough into fantasy to excuse the enormous holes in his script, though he does a nice job of distracting us with detail.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Story’s an original, and the film is a revelation — a movie that’s as deep as we’re willing to read into it, and an invaluable time capsule for summers far in our future, assuming we ever get there.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Tom Hooper’s outlandishly tacky interpretation seems destined to become one of those once-in-a-blue-moon embarrassments that mars the résumés of great actors (poor Idris Elba, already scarred enough as the villainous Macavity) and trips up the careers of promising newcomers (like ballerina Francesca Hayward, whose wide-eyed, mouth-agape Victoria displays one expression for the entire movie).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    It’s certainly not great literature, but if you can get past the imbecilic script, there’s no question that Bay has seized the opportunity to make 6 Underground as visually stunning as such a project can withstand.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    More often than not, effects-driven blockbusters get dumber as the series goes along, but Jumanji: The Next Level invents some fun ideas to keep things fresh.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    For those with the opportunity to see Away in a theater, the experience will either mesmerize or annoy, as the project feels like a promising first pass — a rough-rendered showcase of Zilbalodis’ myriad gifts, which are better suited to world-building and scenic design than character animation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Stands out in a field of generic, cookie-cutter dramas, not simply in terms of representation — though the female-made, indigenous-focused thriller offers a field day for intersectionality theorists — but also in the unconventional way the story unfolds.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Astonishing as his filmmaking can be at times, it’s Mendes’ attention to character, more than the technique, that makes 1917 one of 2019’s most impressive cinematic achievements.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Gerwig’s script is far more comical than any previously committed to film. This she achieves by emphasizing the humor inherent in the source material.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    A good story is a good story, and Eastwood knows how to tell a good story.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Boseman’s role doesn’t offer nearly as much complexity as the screenwriters seem to think — which is why the movie needs an actor like him to distract us from its many plot holes and paradoxes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    If anyone out there thinks the National Enquirer is merely harmless entertainment, “Scandalous” give them no shortage of alarming reasons to reconsider.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    When a movie taps a nerve with the public, it doesn’t need to be a masterpiece to become a phenomenon, which might explain why Matsoukas puts greater attention on the look, feel and musical signature of the project than she does the plot, which feels thin and familiar.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    In a world where old-timers accuse the youth of being oversensitive snowflakes, Frozen II shows what it means to have one’s heart in the right place.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Sooner or later, Hinako is going to have to learn to face the world on her own, which is where the tension finally arises before this dopey film reaches its sappy conclusion — by showing its heroine, so effortless on water, “learning to ride life’s waves, too.”
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    What goodwill the movie does inspire owes more to the splendid visual world than to anything the story supplies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    If it all made sense, would it still be art? Ironically, the trouble with Redoubt is that it’s not obtuse enough. It’s the first Barney film audiences won’t have trouble sleeping after — or through.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Westmoreland approaches the project every bit as respectful toward Japanese customs as Jones was, although only a percentage of her insights carry over to the film. They’re still there, mind you, but more difficult to detect.

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