Peter Debruge

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For 1,087 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Inside Out
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
1087 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    In spite of its tweaks to gender roles, the duo’s sexcapades and Snow’s spirited performance, Hooking Up doesn’t offer much by way of surprise, which doesn’t mean that as the odd, amiable couple head toward their personal reckonings, you won’t find yourself rooting for them. Separately and together.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The movie is an exasperating puzzle with most of the pieces missing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The film even pokes fun at itself in the process, fully aware that Spenser Confidential isn’t meant to be taken as seriously as Wahlberg’s last few movies — and just as well, since irreverence plays well on Netflix.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    There’s a stylistic and narrative elegance to Petzold’s approach, with its clean lensing and repeated use of a single piece of music (the rolling piano Adagio from Bach’s Concerto in D Minor, BWV 974), that suggests restraint, where a queer filmmaker might have propelled things into camp territory. In a way, it’s a shame that Undine stops short, since the material feels thin, and the statement as murky as the lake to which the camera ultimately returns.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The movie doesn’t show a complex enough representation of either adult life or the New York literary world to offer much depth to grownups (it’s far more engaged with Joanna’s romantic life and dream sequences set at the Waldorf Astoria), which means that My Salinger Year must have been intended to inspire young women for whom 1995 seems like the ancient past.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The emperor is naked, Greed wants us to realize, but unless we agree to radically rethink our own wardrobes, does it make any difference?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The trouble with “P.S. I Still Love You” is that nearly all the reasons that Lara Jean makes such a refreshingly different romantic lead are contained in the earlier film, and here, she’s reduced to a version of the passive Disney princess, trying to decide between two dudes who both think she’s swell.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    What felt so revolutionary in 2012 is no less visionary today, but packs a disappointing sense of familiarity this time around, like tearing open your Christmas presents to find … a huge stack of hand-me-down clothing. Or else, like watching a magic trick performed a second time from a different angle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Ironbark’s hook is that it’s based on true events, and the underlying history deserves to be shared.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Sure, it’s fun to see a movie skewer the vapid soullessness of social media and the unregulated economy of male desire, but Zola ultimately rings hollow. The actors are fearless, and yet, how much do we know about these characters in the end? The answer: something of their values, but almost nothing of their lives.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Although the entire film runs just 87 minutes, as Lucky Grandma unspools, Wong’s predicament starts to feel increasingly outlandish, making it difficult for Sealy to sustain the offbeat humor and strong momentum of the opening stretch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Shinkai hasn’t gone far enough into fantasy to excuse the enormous holes in his script, though he does a nice job of distracting us with detail.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    It’s certainly not great literature, but if you can get past the imbecilic script, there’s no question that Bay has seized the opportunity to make 6 Underground as visually stunning as such a project can withstand.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Boseman’s role doesn’t offer nearly as much complexity as the screenwriters seem to think — which is why the movie needs an actor like him to distract us from its many plot holes and paradoxes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    What goodwill the movie does inspire owes more to the splendid visual world than to anything the story supplies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    If it all made sense, would it still be art? Ironically, the trouble with Redoubt is that it’s not obtuse enough. It’s the first Barney film audiences won’t have trouble sleeping after — or through.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Westmoreland approaches the project every bit as respectful toward Japanese customs as Jones was, although only a percentage of her insights carry over to the film. They’re still there, mind you, but more difficult to detect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    In the documentary, the director appears to be interviewing the twins separately, but he’s really just filming them as they recite their own story. They’ve chosen their words carefully; they cry on cue; and they share just enough, while holding back an enormous amount of information.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    In the end, the project doesn’t really work. The Coen brothers have a touch for the absurd, and a gift for dialogue, that’s lacking here, and without those two qualities, Jesus wears out his welcome relatively early in the journey.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Humor turns every kill into a sick punchline, and while the writers do a fine job of making them funny, like macabre cartoons in which Wile E. Coyote can rebound from unthinkable injuries, the movie’s tone negates a fundamental respect for human life.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The trouble is, apart from Glover’s unforgettably weird contribution, Lucky Day isn’t a particularly memorable offering. It’s enough to get Avary back in the game, one hopes, but considering his talent, this is hardly the film his fans have been waiting for.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The movie may be a self-help exercise of sorts — for those who seldom recognize themselves on screen, and who don’t measure up to the expectations set by rom-coms and princess movies — but it’s disguised as a shaggy character study.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Slow and stuffy, like a filmed play, but also considerably more nuanced and mature than your typical relationship drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Exasperatingly low-key ... This is no time for subtlety, and yet Green’s film feels so restrained, you’d think she was afraid of being sued for slander.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    For a film bursting with so many ideas, only a fraction of them seem to work. And yet, as an artistic statement, “Tigers” proves as fearless as its kid characters, and an indicator of incredible things to come from its creator.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Granted, there aren’t a lot of surprises in The Art of Racing in the Rain. If anything, knowing — or at least anticipating — how the film’s myriad tragedies will unfold seems to heighten the effect.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    With any luck, Relive will get a reboot down the road, in which someone takes better advantage of the basic idea.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    To the extent that audiences are willing to go along with an overwrought documentary that strives to imitate what far more professionally executed podcasts have innovated in recent years ..., Berman’s stunt could turn into one of the year’s buzzier nonfiction releases.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    It’s nowhere near the embarrassment of Brian De Palma’s “Domino,” or any number of recent studio tentpoles. Nor is it fresh enough to pretend that audiences had missed out on something special if it had been buried altogether — except perhaps for Luss, who’s bound to get another shot.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    This is the new normal for horror movies: The screenplays have to seem hipper than the premise they represent, which puts “Child’s Play” in the weird position of pointing out and poking fun at all the ways it fails to make sense.

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