For 81 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lucy Mangan's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Back to Life: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 The Goop Lab with Gwyneth Paltrow: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 40 out of 81
  2. Negative: 4 out of 81
81 tv reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    What saves it from simple tedious schmaltz (notwithstanding the clambering-on-tabletops-in-solidarity scene in the cafeteria as Hilde reads out – so fearlessly! So maturely! So driven-by-the-truthly! – the online comments from under her murder report) is Prince’s performance. She is simply astonishing. You wouldn’t believe her character in any other hands.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It reminded me of 90s Prime Suspect, which is not a bad thing, but nor is it especially revolutionary to keep doing that today.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Everyone involved, of course, might fare better if they had a decent script, proper lighting, well-choreographed fight scenes and sets that didn’t look as if they had been nailed together from whatever was left after Michael Keaton left the building in 1989. ... For now, though, pure and perfect trash is what we need – and Batwoman provides.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 20 Lucy Mangan
    It is terrible. ... Nothing has been written, shown or scored in a way to elicit any degree of human emotion.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Feel Good should make you feel good. It’s not only an immaculately written and paced piece of work and a properly funny comedy, it is also has created a delicately and intricately constructed, deeply humane world where people make mistakes but are not damned, and have flaws that are not fatal, and – despite all the obstacles – connect across and despite their divides. It is good for almost everything that ails us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Julian Fellowes has been typing again. It is the year flimpty plomp, the pasteenth century in days of yore. ... Smash cut to 26 years later. Afternoon tea has been invented, Sophia is dead, the titular London district of Belgravia has been built (by James, in partnership with Thomas Cubitt, dontcha know) and the script is even worse.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The 10-part series is technically a comedy, but it hits so many pressure points so hard in such rapid succession that if you do laugh it will be through some quite considerable anxiety and pain. I mean that as a compliment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    If you can let yourself watch as a child again, the hour can become charming once more, even for those old enough to remember when the future Marty was going back to (“It’s your kids, Mary!”) was still to come.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    The musical interludes are the best bits but even these are a mixed bag. ... There’s also some woefully underbaked dialogue.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    In summary it sounds soapy, but in reality it is ruthlessly unsensationalist and at times deeply moving.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The true pleasure of the thing lies in Lillis’s wonderful performance, which manages to convey the depths and numbness of loss beneath the layers of more ordinary teenage fury and frustration all lying beneath the traditional pose of sardonic disaffection. ... There are snippets of Daria in there, Freaks and Geeks’ Lindsay (Stanley would fit in nicely with them, too), Janis from Mean Girls and Angela Chase, linchpin of the much-lamented My So-Called Life. And you might catch the occasional whiff of Heathers, too.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Every episode – which run for between 35 and 55 minutes – feels too long. ... Instead of the original series’ bleakly measured contemplation of mankind’s capacity for cruelty and evil, the reboot falls into either preachiness or schmaltz.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It’s too cool and self-conscious for its own good, and seems to revel in any and all deaths on screen, regardless of whether the victims are “guilty” or not.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Love Is Blind is absurd, revolting, endearing, toxic and wholesome by turns – and addictive as hell throughout.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    At the moment, Chris seems too good to be true, and a character put to work mostly in the service of enlightening the lead, everything else about Work in Progress suggests that this minor flaw will soon be remedied. Abby may say she feels like an eternally unfinished person, but this show is already fully fledged.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Unfolds at a steady, confident pace, with the director, Leonora Lonsdale, as surefooted as her writer, parcelling out twists and treats and fine performances as it goes.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Lucy Mangan
    There is an adamantine refusal to accept that sorrow and anxiety are attendant upon life all the way through, and a demented commitment to expunging every negative moment from it, whether by vegan eating, cold plunges, the cleansing of energy fields, psychic intervention or any other pseudoscientific activity that can be monetised for people whose gullibility marches in lockstep with their wealth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Avenue 5 is taking its time to find a theme and story to coalesce round them. By the end of the four episodes available for review, the plot had been back and forth along a few grooves that were already beginning to feel well-worn. The rest remained a disparate collection of delights and longueurs, despite the formidable talent before and behind the cameras.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    All eight stories successfully straddle many fine lines. They are fleet – just half an hour long – without being insubstantial; uplifting without being schmaltzy; inspirational without being cringe-making. They don’t offer direct commentary on current US and others’ attitudes towards immigration, but they don’t need to.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Every performer is wonderful, not least because the script is wonderful, playing the sex for laughs and the search for intimacy as something serious, good and noble. Not a single character is a cipher – even the smallest parts have a sketched backstory and some good gags.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The details pile up, but intrigue fails to mount.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Messiah is potent stuff packed with fine performances.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Although it registers friendships and fallings-out, it does not make them into soapy storylines. It prefers, equally refreshingly, to dig deep into the many qualities that must combine to make a single performer, and then how they must coalesce into one team.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a bloodstained love letter to a classic, beautifully and delicately scented with just the faintest hint of ham gothic yarns need; a homage to all the great Counts who have gone before, but still entirely its own thing. And again, like the best of Gatiss and Moffat’s Sherlocks, with the searching intelligence that promises to flesh out the foundational story. Enjoy sinking your teeth into it all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    [A] rich, clever, funny and courageous adaptation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    There is plenty of action, for those who want it, but this is far from the standard wartime miniseries. It is a beautifully turned ensemble piece, with everyone getting their time in the spotlight as we move between locations without anybody’s characters or storylines feeling underbaked.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It was all as gorgeous, breathtaking, moving and harrowing as we have come to expect from this world-leading branch of the BBC. There is nothing to criticise or cavil at here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Apart from the novelty of seeing Japan’s capital unfetishised – this is a Tokyo where people live, work and manage the daily grind, not a neon-soaked fun palace or futuristic hellscape – and the odd animated interlude (created by the company behind Hey Duggee, fact fans), nothing here feels new or revelatory.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There are attempts at knowingness: at one point, our Henry tells someone a prophecy has to rhyme. This is not a good idea, as it throws into too sharp relief the limits to what Geralt and his merry band of sorceresses and proto-feminist princesses can be said to know. Play it straight, dear scriptwriters, or don’t play it at all. ... But again, if you like this sort of thing, go nuts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    By nearly halfway through the series we have had only a set of decidedly unoriginal revelations revealed in a deeply pedestrian manner. You can feel the on-screen talent longing to let rip, but the script and the structure and the sense just aren’t there.

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