For 1,482 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 WALL-E
Lowest review score: 0 McHale's Navy
Score distribution:
1482 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    To put Uncorked in wine terms, it’s not complex, but only a philistine would dismiss what’s easy and pleasing as flawed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    It's always presumptuous to refer to a slice of history as "little known" simply because you didn't know about it, but it's probably safe to say that Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution — a rousing look at disability rights — will tell a new story to a lot of people.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The lack of clear identification of interview subjects and amorphous shape of the film can be frustrating. A segment on the history of book-burning, for example, feels gratuitous but, for the record, everyone in the film is against it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    While you can admire the “House of Mirrors” structure of The Whistlers and its ironic mix of glum and glamorous, there is little emotional purchase here. This is a flatter, more arch experience than Porumboiu’s devastatingly absurd earlier films, and the entire exercise feels more about ingenuity than art.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Within the frame of an old-fashioned stab-and-splatter exploitation flick, The Hunt is consistently smartish.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    The mostly non-professional cast do a credible job of depicting a family growing progressively more anxious under increasing pressure.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Beanpole makes you feel its two-hour-plus running time, with drawn-out scenes full of off-centre framing and claustrophobic close-ups, but there’s an exhilaration in the audacity of the filmmaking, as the boldness of its portrayal of the survival drive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    There’s enough of Austen’s generous social vision and her character-revealing dialogue to make this watchable but Emma. takes a long time to connect emotionally.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A solid, if not revelatory portrait of contemporary Russia through the story of exiled oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    The Traitor is a pleasure to watch. Working with cinematographer Vladan Radovic, Bellocchio blends sweeping camera work and flurries of action with painterly lighting and often ironic musical cues. The story itself is somewhat over-stuffed — the time-jumping narrative (Bellochio and three other writers are credited) and an onscreen counter of murder victims — but this is still a welcome chance to see a great old school European auteur at work.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    We’re gripped by the tension of Greene’s tautly calibrated performance, as a mother performing a daily high-wire act, trying to keep her family together and her children from harm.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The subject alone should ensure that it gets lots of attention from film reviewers and despite a jumpy, hodge-podge style, should be generally enjoyable to anyone interested in the seductive, contentious cultural phenomenon of The New Yorker’s famous critic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Reservations aside, Clemency has moments of shivering gravity. Almost all of them involve complex emotions registered in Woodard’s extraordinary face, her dignified resistance to a turmoil of emotions within her, and her agonized need for forgiveness.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    A family movie with lots of CGI-talking animals and star Robert Downey Jr. hiding his charisma, Dolittle is a tiresomely chaotic concoction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The film is kinetic and elliptical, with clips from different eras juxtaposed in panels, moving back to a single frame of dancers’ feet, or artfully posed in instants of euphoria. This is a film that makes you want to absorb the language of dance or, at least, immerse yourself in more Merce, which makes this an exemplary introduction to a major twentieth century artist.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Apart from the overall endorsement of women’s friendships — and the credible warmth between the two likeable stars — the script’s feminist message is hopelessly muddled.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The project is a unique social experiment which we can all participate in, in a way, dipping back in time to connect with old acquaintances and, inevitably, measuring our own ups and downs in the interval.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    Terrence Malick’s latest, A Hidden Life, is one of the year’s most ambitious films and an arguable masterpiece, though, admittedly, your receptivity to it depends on your capacity to experience three solemn hours of waving fields of wheat, theology and Nazi cruelty. c
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    A stylish melodrama and feminist lament.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    To quote Bill Murray’s song again, “Star Wars/ those near and far wars” checks the boxes of a lot of the audience’s base, while seeming unburdened by real gravity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    While Dark Waters is something of a let-down for a Haynes film, it’s otherwise sturdy enough. One can admire the commitment of Ruffalo, who plays the role of the modest, decent, semi-accidental hero without vanity or trite psychology.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Charm, humanity and a passel of filmmaking insights are all here, rewarding both the dedicated fans and newcomers to Varda, who achieved a new level of public profile in her last decade.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    A magic realist fantasy, a ghost story, a love story and political allegory, Atlantics packs a deceptive amount of complexity in a gauzy, slender film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    This is the sort of film that will divide audiences between those who will have their hearts torn out… and those who will want to tear out their hair.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Synonyms free-wheeling episodic structure can grow a tad wearying, but Mercier’s aggressively kinetic performance and Lapid’s take-no-prisoners dismantling of the Israeli macho mystique — or French hypocritical superiority — are, in the best way, outrageous.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is a work stiff with pointed talk and chance encounters, little of which feels original. The acting, while variable, often has a stilted, recitative quality, as if the characters, rather than family members, recently met at a script readings.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    This is some of De Niro’s most moving work in years. His performance full of anxious misfit energy, where his often-parodied grimaces, tics and haunted gaze feel entirely correct.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Norwegian director Joachim Rønning (who co-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales) offers nothing unexpected here, in what amounts to a complicated exercise in paint-by-numbers movie-making.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Ozon’s film evolves less as a procedural story than a character study.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 42 Liam Lacey
    As the movie flips through familiar Bourne/Bond tropes, the dialogue by David Benioff, Billy Ray, and Darren Lemke, feels clichéd to the point of parody, with lines like “It’s like The Hindenburg crashed into The Titanic!” Or, “I think I know why he’s as good as you. He is you!” Only, let’s be honest, not as good.

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