For 170 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jake Cole's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Jafar Panahi's Taxi
Lowest review score: 0 No Escape
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 80 out of 170
  2. Negative: 67 out of 170
170 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The film’s occasional gestures toward pseudo-feminist empowerment only compound the hollowness of its protagonist.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    The film may leave you wondering what purpose this franchise serves if not to give expression to Michael Bay's nationalist, racist, and misogynistic instincts.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    This adaptation gets straight to the heart of the material, which is basically two hours of stray cats introducing themselves.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    For all the emphasis on video game characters who can be swapped out on a whim, it’s the players themselves who come across as the most thinly drawn and interchangeable beneath their avatars.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    As a suspense film, it’s so sluggishly structured that it borders on the avant-garde.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The most thrilling and haunting details here are actively undermined by the chief technical gimmick of the film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    For a spell, Melina Matsoukas’s film exudes the concision of an old B movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    It’s difficult to imagine a worse time to release Brian Kirk’s 21 Bridges than the present.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Portraying Tubman above all else as a vessel for a higher power ironically only makes her appear less tangible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    This is a rare case of a film that’s stronger when it colors inside the lines than radically traces outside of them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Motherless Brooklyn feels altogether too tidy, a film that revives many of the touchstones of noir, but never that throbbing unease that courses through the classics of the genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    At a time when the nation continues to weigh the fate of its auto industry, James Mangold’s depiction of the Ford Motor Company facing its first major financial threat transparently plays to nostalgic reveries of the industry’s golden age.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    In the film, a man's individual tragedy illuminates the emptiness of the systems that define him.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The film is a vivid depiction of how a confrontation with the unknown can so easily shatter the fragile bonds that hold us together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Ema
    In the film, the literal union of bodies is the only logical means of conveying the reestablishment of emotional bonds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    In Alma Har’el’s film, Shia LaBeouf’s plays an avatar of his father as an expressionistic act of self-therapy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The actors’ hammy performances only compound the amusement of watching a dynasty propped up by largesse fall to pieces at the very thought of actually having to earn their way in life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    In a time when awareness and acknowledgement of racial bias and extrajudicial measures by law enforcement in America is at its most widespread, such scenes feel condescendingly pitched to an unconverted audience of the imagination.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The film falls back on a reductive rumination on the balance between maternal obligation and career aspiration.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jake Cole
    At last, Pedro Costa appears to be more interested in how people get on with life than how they keep the company of ghosts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Kantemir Balagov depicts pain in blunt terms, but he traces the aftershocks of coping and collapse with delicate subtlety.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    It’s at its best when showing how gangsters undermine their lofty notions of nobility with displays of narcissism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Chromatically, The Load makes Saving Private Ryan look like The Band Wagon. Yet Glavonic still manages to convey the devastation and numbness that results from atrocity without resorting to exploitation. Trauma is approached obliquely, more a subliminal fact of life than a single psychological rupture to be confronted and mended.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film seems to have cobbled its set pieces together from a series of close-ups edited as if by random selection.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The Kitchen’s inability to criticize its characters without falling back on mild endorsement for their warped empowerment cheapens the film’s moments of reflection, turning them into perfunctory scenes of mild protest.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The film’s action is the most extreme encapsulation yet of Dwayne Johnson’s bombastic blockbuster work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Unfortunately, the care with which the filmmakers set up Them That Follow’s context and their characters crumbles in the final act.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Lesage pulls focus onto the aftershocks of trauma rather than the traumatic events themselves.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Aaron Henry is prone to pulling back from any moment that might give greater depth to his revenge tale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Jon Watts deftly weaves the epic and the mundane aspects of Spider-Man’s existence throughout the film.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film lacks for the more lacerating, freely parodic energy of The Larry Sanders Show and 30 Rock.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film is an all-too-fitting whimper of a conclusion to a franchise that never remotely fulfilled its potential.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The film is frustrating in the end for reaffirming the traditional blockbuster’s allegiance to human perseverance.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Guy Ritchie’s live-action remake is content to trace the original’s narrative beats with perfunctory indifference.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The film is at its strongest when depicting how Diamantino becomes a tool of politicians hoping to oust Portugal from the EU.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The film is a reminder of the potential of these films before they became weighed down by blockbuster-ready excesses.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Shazam! sees DC combining the golden-age optimism espoused by Wonder Woman and the jubilant, self-aware silliness of Aquaman into a satisfying whole.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film’s open-ended narrative tends to be undermined by the simplicity of its thematic signifiers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    If the film sometimes feels too small in comparison to its predecessors, it manages to make the most of its quietest moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Battle Angel is by some distance the most entertaining of the recent crop of would-be franchise starters, exciting on its own merits while leaving just enough of its world tantalizingly unexplored to actually fuel our interest in wanting to see where its characters go from here.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    The Mexico of this film is merely a place of abject lawlessness, whose hellishness exists only to stoke our fascination for how the protagonist grows as a person by drawing on her inner strength.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The film’s twist ending exists only to retroactively justify writer-director Steven Knight’s feeble stylistic choices.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The climax’s bizarre left turns culminate in a final image so bewildering that were the film not so relentlessly dour it might have clarified Replicas as an absurdist comedy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    With its fine-tuned comic timing and feeling of constant action, Into the Spider-Verse is downright invigorating, and that’s evident even before it gets to its dazzling, dimensional-colliding climax.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    A Private War ultimately sides with the late journalist’s assertion that the whos and whys of war matter far less in journalism than finding the right human-interest angle to hook an audience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    One may wish that the entire film had restaged the entirely of Tchaikovsky's ballet rather than reimagine it as an ultimately lifeless epic fantasy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The anti-P.C. scorn that establishes a white boy's nervous entry into rap gradually becomes a sincere, if hilarious, treatise on the impossibility of reducing art to value judgments.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Wang’s particular skill as a filmmaker is his ability to approach well-worn narrative devices from fresh angles, and here he manages to defend the importance of art, attack the neoliberal devastation of cultural liberalism, and argue for the renewed public commitment to the arts from a wryly comic perspective that eschews sentimentality.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Patrick Wang's particular skill as a filmmaker is his ability to approach well-worn narrative devices from fresh angles.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The final act's full-tilt embrace of action effectively undermines Tom Hardy's flashes of actorly idiosyncrasy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The documentary often struggles to extract deeper thoughts from its subject about her wild career as a pioneering rock feminist.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Roma is autobiography as autocritique, and in exploring a point of view adjacent to his own, Cuarón appears to have rediscovered his identity as a filmmaker.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The final act of The House with a Clock in Its Walls stumbles between awkward, telegraphed jolts and busy, effects-heavy action, completely losing sight of the trauma and grief that was meant to give the film its emotional core.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Neil Jordan’s deft control of pace and tone elevates Greta past mere gimmickry, resulting in a comic thriller whose goofy humor only compounds its mastery of suspense.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Peter Farrelly manages to respect the severity of the characters’ social context while ensuring that Green Book never steps outside its protagonists’ relationship, a delicate balancing act that credibly makes a feel-good, effervescent comedy out of its thorny subject matter without ever sanitizing it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Vox Lux sets up its main character as a beneficiary of tragedy, opening up a compellingly macabre narrative about how school shootings are becoming so commonplace that they can effectively serve as launchpads for stardom. But that idea goes nowhere, as Vox Lux proceeds to play Celeste's experience in the music industry mostly straight.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Fahrenheit 11/9 represents a sincerely bold attempt to capture the overwhelming civic decay that led to our current political crisis, but Michel Moore’s circus-showman duplicity is as crass and abhorrently self-promoting as that of Donald Trump.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Jonah Hill constantly falls back on providing vague justification for his characters' behaviors, along with spoonfuls of sentiment to let the more dour moments go down easier.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Richard E. Grant is captivating on his own, but his rapport with Melissa McCarthy is so effortless that their characters’ conversations offer deeper pleasures than the main plot of the film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    For all its flaws, Widows is McQueen’s most fascinating, bracing feature to date, a demonstration of the filmmaker embracing his commercial instincts instead of trying to pass them off as weighty and important.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Peterloo so simply recounts the details of its subject matter that its culminating horror unsettlingly feels like little more than a cathartic inevitability.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Olivier Assayas drains the film of the playfulness at its margins, leaving only an esoteric lecture in its place.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    By treating its main character as exceptional, Yann Demange's film validates the punitive system it seeks to criticize.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Even an act of noble sacrifice late in the film has a faintly goofy tone to it, reflective of Shane Black's streak of puckish nihilism. That attitude makes him a perfect fit for this franchise, which lost its thematic viciousness after the anti-imperialist original.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Kin
    Jonathan and Josh Baker's Kin, a feature that comprises little more than an extended introduction to its characters, resembles a TV pilot that's been released into theaters as a standalone property.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    When Mark Wahlberg's Silva isn't wielding run-on sentences as military-grade weapons, he barks out derivative commands and asinine statements that make him sound like a 13-year-old playing Call of Duty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    It reduces the domestication of wolves to a series of simplistic interactions that don’t exactly convey the difficulties of a wild animal overcoming millennia of instinct.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The Darkest Minds never communicates the overwhelming horror of a society whose children are either dead or in the process of being exterminated, or the hopelessness of kids discovering that every potential benefactor may have ulterior motives.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    It boasts such confident performances and choreography that it feels as much like a final draft of the 2008 film as a continuation of it.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The film has the tone and look of a direct-to-video feature, and some shots of Keanu Reeves are so waxen that the actor almost looks rotoscoped.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Ebulliently funny, visually inventive, and above all passionately committed to the idea that heroism isn't a burden but an uplifting realization of our best qualities.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Deadpool 2 muddies the distinction between parodying comic-book-movie conventions and perfunctorily adhering to them.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Terminal's actors are awkward and stiff in trying to project hard-boiled cool, and all while delivering lines that sound as if they had been passed multiple times through an online translation tool.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Even the depiction of how both men waver during the Wimbledon final — of Borg losing his cool while McEnroe avoids succumbing to petulance — fails to tie into the larger portrait of their rivalry.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Submergence's globetrotting only succeeds at exposing the hollowness of the characters at the film's center.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    In its final act, the film abandons its fruitful investigation of belief systems in favor of a simplistic articulation of Mary's inspiration.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Ava
    The film's constant cruelty is so inescapable that it starts to feel unfair not only to the protagonist, but to Iran itself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Ava
    The film's constant cruelty is so inescapable that it starts to feel unfair not only to the protagonist, but to Iran itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Valérie Massadian's Milla begins with a stylistic bait-and-switch that neatly summarizes the film's overall sense of formal balance.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Steven S. DeKnight's film lacks for Guillermo del Toro's visual acumen, but it makes up for that with an energetic sense of chaos throughout its front-and-center skirmishes, and in the end hedges closer to the nightmarish intensity of such inspirational texts as Hideaki Anno's Neon Genesis Evangelion.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    This isn’t an adaptation of a video game so much as an adaptation of a video game’s tutorial level.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The film may involve the instant movement among unfathomable distances and the shattered limits of space and time, but it’s only Storm Reid's character who feels multidimensional.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Armando Iannucci satirizes the manner in which political power is accorded to those who can mask cutthroat ambition behind an outward projection of bland inoffensiveness.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Jake Cole
    At a time when Americans are constantly bombarded with reports of unpunished police brutality, the film suggests that the true problem with justice in our country is that law enforcement isn't violent enough.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    When the film's tone slides so firmly back into the murk, it's hard not to see DC's notion of heroism as borderline nihilistic.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The Snowman is missing so much basic connective tissue as to be rendered almost completely inexplicable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film reinforces only the most simplistic and patriotic vision of Churchill, its closed-off view of the man reminiscent of the many tracking shots that wind through the underground tunnels of the U.K.‘s war command, constantly peeking into rooms with classified meetings as doors are abruptly closed to keep them secret
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Thelma's transition into a paranormal thriller doesn’t complicate its initially potent character study.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The hollow grandeur of the film's action only gives the proceedings a glib undertone that also undermines the rare occasions of earnestness that the heroes exhibit toward fallen comrades.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    James Franco's The Disaster Artist perfectly conveys the surreal hell of what the production of Tommy Wiseau's The Room must have been like.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    The film is the finest balance yet of Martin McDonagh's bleak sense of humor and offbeat moral sincerity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    There's a blank space at the core of Molly's Game that the protagonist cannot fill, unable as she is to represent anything beyond her esoteric narrative of unorthodox self-actualization.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The only thing that offsets the film's self-negating revisionism are the scenes involving Gillian Anderson vicereine.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    As in Destin Daniel Cretton’s previous feature, Short Term 12, the oscillations between sociological horror and misty-eyed sentimentality call attention to how meticulously the film arranges its emotional punches.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The decade-long effort to bring the Dark Tower books to the screen looks like a cheap, unauthorized cash-in.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The tediously forestalled twists suck away time from what should be the film's focus—its action—and leaves only two scenes worthy of celebration.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    In devoting so much time to the dull, counterproductive mechanics of the action assembly, Dunkirk dispenses with nearly all other elements of drama.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Baby Driver literalizes Edgar Wright’s fascination with people’s emotional overreliance on pop culture as a cover for arrested development.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    The sensory overload of Michael Bay's hyperkinetic cinema is such that it eradicates any actual sense of place.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Too much is at stake throughout, leading to formulaic plot filler and exposition that snuff out the spark of the early scenes.

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