Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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For 683 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Nocturama
Lowest review score: 0 Battle of the Year
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 66 out of 683
683 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While it never feels completely defeatist, her film offers scattered snapshots of an uncertain society in its dog days.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A stolid film that largely rests on its director’s competence at helming extravagant aerial views of pyrotechnic destruction.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The truth is that a movie about deeply personal obsessions can’t work if it doesn’t have some of its own, and the prevailing mood of The Current War is indifference.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It seems as though the artist, all too aware of his reputation for both pageantry and shock value, has decided to offer nothing of the kind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A generically competent but unsuspenseful chase film that never lives up to its potential for either social commentary or thrills.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Above all, it’s about the impossible desire, shared by both expats and artists, to forge an identity of one’s own. But whereas the films it quotes sought to create cryptic and contrapuntal meanings, Lapid errs on the side of the loudly obvious, building to a final shot that might as well be a thesis statement for the rest of the film.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 33 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Awkward and unfunny in exceptionally long stretches, Reboot probably won’t turn his diehard fans against him. But it’s unlikely to win him any new converts either. For that, there’s "Clerks," "Mallrats," or "Chasing Amy."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    One can smirk at the movie’s fuzzy philosophies and primordial clichés and still appreciate the delivery of Lee’s action scenes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Running only a little shorter than the average season of On Cinema At The Cinema, it’s never as cringe-inducingly funny or inventive as the webseries that spawned it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The result often feels superficial; it is neither a definitive account of the creation of Scott’s touchstone of horror and sci-fi, nor a cogent analysis of its aestheticized subtexts, those gritty and unnerving surfaces and the things lurking underneath.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Billy Chew’s screenplay takes at least one important lesson from the best of both crime movies and small-town portraits: The characters, however minor or ridiculous, seem to lead lives that started well before the movie and will continue long after. Well, except for Dick himself. He’s gone.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The sequence is Last Blood’s pièce de résistance, and perhaps the only compelling reason the movie has to exist. But it’s also pure, relentless, grimacing punishment at the end of a joyless film, choreographed like a ritual sacrifice. Rambo has always been a monster, but in his old age, he has become something even worse: no fun.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    A mesmerizing sci-fi drama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Spurlock’s documentary turns out to be the exact thing it is meant to expose: an unfulfilling product passed off as something that’s good for you.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    What keeps Don’t Let Go watchable is, ironically, its predictability: the cop-movie clichés, the shootouts, the mishandled evidence, the bargain-bin twists.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Given the awfulness of its predecessor, which was this publication’s pick for the worst film of 2016, a sequel that’s merely pedestrian represents a dramatic improvement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    If Brügger shares the doubts of Williams and other Hammarskjöld conspiracy theorists about Operation Celeste (in all likelihood a hoax, though not a Soviet one), he doesn’t let them get in the way of a good story. As for the latest official U.N. inquiry, its report is due sometime this year. But then, can you really trust it?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Yes, Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw is extremely silly. For its first 30 or so minutes, it also manages to be fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This kind of hamfisted manipulation seems par for the course in a movie that’s eager to lob as much as it can as its central problems. The theme of change is purely cosmetic: The characters are intractable, and they all offer different versions of the same pathology.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    At its core, Barbarians is about the failure of communication. (The subplot about Mariana’s affair is more important than it seems.) This places it into a long tradition of modernist responses to fascism that stretches back to Eugène Ionesco—though one still can’t shake the feeling that Jude is more interested in pointing out obvious ironies than in anything else.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This one feels one-size-fits-all—which is to say, it isn’t especially tailored to either of its stars. It just sort of hangs on them, getting more and more tattered as it goes along.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Ultimately, it’s the awkwardness that they’re prodding. The Plagiarists isn’t asking why one person would tell a lie, but why another would be so bothered by it — an ambitious line of inquiry for which the film provides more references than concrete answers.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Think of it as a downmarket Atomic Blonde (a film that does Besson’s established shtick with a lot more panache and less ick) or Red Sparrow without the surface-level professionalism; what’s clear is that Besson doesn’t want anyone to think about Anna very hard.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The mystery itself is rote and, despite its jokey foreshadowing and its constant winks to the audience, never smart enough to really work as a genre parody. Instead, the movie just breezes along on the strength of Aniston and Sandler’s easygoing rapport.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Among all the cardinal sins of moviemaking it commits (up to and including reusing an iconic needle drop from a Martin Scorsese movie), the worst is this: It makes Shaft look uncool.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Ron Howard’s documentary Pavarotti is content to bask in his glow; despite the broad array of home movies, family photos, interviews, TV outtakes, and concert recordings at its disposal, it never feels intimate with Pavarotti the person.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 33 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Domino is, for large stretches, just ludicrous—and atypically boring. It’s a sad sight to see from a filmmaker who, once upon a time, excelled at drawing a viewer into the thrill of seeing a sequence come together, with all the pieces falling into place. In Domino, one finds only the pieces.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Ricthie’s Aladdin feels sluggish in comparison to the fast-paced original. Even the songs suffer; the direction of the musical numbers is surprisingly unimaginative and turgid, to the point that even surefire showstoppers like “Prince Ali” and the mighty “A Whole New World” end up succumbing to lackluster staging and uncomfortable performances.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Though Parabellum delivers at least a couple of action scenes that rank with the best of the series...there’s a certain fatigue to its two biggest set pieces, both of which pit Wick and his allies against unending waves of faceless henchmen. Wick is unstoppable. Do the movies know where to stop?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    And yet the movie never errs in its sincerity, which extends all the way to the decision to depict Pasolini’s murder in graphic detail.

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