Emily Yoshida

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For 238 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Emily Yoshida's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Roma
Lowest review score: 0 The Emoji Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 238
238 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    We’re left floored by the facts of Colin Warner’s case; the film itself falls away.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    It’s the work of a filmmaker who has been honing her own jarring, idiosyncratic sense of rhythm and character for years. As a debut feature, it feels auspicious; as a snapshot of a masculine emergency, it feels timeless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    There’s nothing cheap about the rest of Annabelle: Creation, so this scattered finale felt like a letdown.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    Even those of us willing to accept that there are many different shades at work here will likely feel the foundation of the film fall out from under us by its conclusion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Director Matt Spicer’s Sundance breakout is a friend-crush tale as old as time, modeled almost to a T on "The Talented Mr. Ripley" (without the murder). As such, your mileage will vary depending on whether or not you’ve ever been to Café Gratitude and how much of a tolerance you have for Aubrey Plaza.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    As a character study, it’s highly successful, but given the context it will be watched in — albeit not quite as oxygen-deprived and manic as Sundance — it feels a little too pat.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Emily Yoshida
    There are many films that attempt to illuminate the world through pain, but Step is most instructive in its moments of joy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    This is a low-stakes, no-frills, point-A-to-point-B crime thriller, taking inspiration from every parent’s worst nightmare, and pretty much nothing else.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    The Incredible Jessica James is a little odd duck of a film, an old-fashioned romantic comedy that’s decidedly modern in its frame of reference, a character-driven piece that never lets us too deep into its protagonist, a movie as pleasant as it is fleeting.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 0 Emily Yoshida
    It is one of the darkest, most dismaying films I have ever seen, much less one ostensibly made for children.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    It elicits more than a few excruciating laugh-out-loud moments, but it’s also tragic and vulnerable — not to mention frequently unpleasant.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    It’s a light musing on adulthood and monogamy and sisterhood, washed in Pavlovian period nostalgia. The revelations are gentle, but worthwhile.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Like "Bridesmaids," it makes no more promises than an actual night out: These people will be there, and the goal is to have a good time. And while it may not quite have the undergirding pathos of the former, Girls Trip is a very good time.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    A deeply silly midsummer lark that makes up for the fact that it’s about nothing by being incredibly entertaining.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    All these performers are given decent setups, but the script loses interest in anything that starts to look like a comedic through line.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    The Transformers movies are a favorite object of critical scorn, and narratively, The Last Knight remains barely coherent. But it’s more fun than "Age of Extinction," though both movies are so drunk on money and effects they accidentally go weird.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    All Eyez on Me is rarely more than a faithful adaptation of the rapper’s Wikipedia entry, so fixated on name-checking every footnote of Shakur’s public life that there is no space to explore the experience of the man himself.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Emily Yoshida
    It does not suffice to call The Book of Henry bad; it’s nonfunctional, so poorly conceived from the ground up as to slip out of the grasp of the usual standards one applies to narrative film. It might be admirable if it wasn’t such torture to watch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Rough Night, which is like an episode of Broad City that got a blowout and smoked a pound of primo studio notes, tries to have it both ways. It wants to be a character-based lost-weekend romp, but keeps forcing itself toward increasingly ridiculous and self-consciously naughty set pieces.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Beatriz at Dinner may not stick the landing, but its central clash between healers and destroyers maintains its choke hold long after the credits have rolled.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Emily Yoshida
    In telling the story of a disappearing slice of America, Zhao has created a portrait of resilience, and the bonds that last even after the rodeo’s over.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    The script is frantically trying to build a whole world when a modest house would do.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Cinematically, it’s undeniably gripping, a tightly wound contraption of nervous energy, grief, and gore. But it’s in service of a story that’s been told countless times before, and it’s not clear where Ramsay’s usually singular point of view is in play.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Haneke’s integration of the ways we communicate and conduct our lives via phone and laptop feels uniquely effective.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Loveless gives us a multicourse meal of social ills, too dispersed to feel like a thesis, yet too chilly to feel like a raw, unbridled tantrum.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    Östlund’s eye for the subtleties of human behavior, especially public behavior, never fails.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Emily Yoshida
    For all its throttling thrills, Good Time is a film about a destructive love — and loving someone despite not having the right kind of love to give them. Ignore the deceptively convivial title: This is the kind of thrill that sticks.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Emily Yoshida
    This is a near-perfect film, and a heightening in every way of everything that was great about Baker’s last movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    To see an unfettered nightmare like this from such an idiosyncratic director feels like a cruel treat, and a welcome stylistic stretch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    It’s incredible what a difference 12 years makes: Baumbach is an altogether more generous and insightful filmmaker here than he was the last time he told this story.

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