Emily Yoshida

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For 238 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Emily Yoshida's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Dead Slow Ahead
Lowest review score: 0 Daddy's Home 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 238
238 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    With its martini-swilling leads and swingy French pop soundtrack, A Simple Favor seems to yearn for a bygone era of nail-biter, but rather than wallow in pastiche, it comes up with something truly contemporary feeling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    In the hands of "Iris" and "Notes on a Scandal" director Richard Eyre, McEwan’s story is stagy and austere, taking place in gleaming flats and spotless courtrooms, like a Nancy Meyers movie with more court wigs. It’s a wan, sapped atmosphere, making the life, faith, and literal blood of a 17-year-old boy all the more stark a line to run through it.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Emily Yoshida
    Peppermint has no surprises up its sleeve, and casting Jennifer Garner as the put-upon housewife turned gun-toting vigilante doesn’t change that. If anything, changing one element of the formula does more to expose its dullness than the same movie starring Liam Neeson.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    From the script to the music to the unfinished-feeling sound edit — nothing about Sierra Burgess feels like it got past a first draft.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Emily Yoshida
    Suspiria is a gorgeous, hideous, uncompromising film, and while it seeks to do many things, settling our minds about the brutality of the past and human nature is not one of them.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Emily Yoshida
    Cuarón never seeks a tidy resolution for their loving, lopsided, complicated relationship. But it’s one of the reasons why Roma leaves such a deep and lasting impression.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    Levin’s dialogue is relentless. Every line and retort is a punch line, and every punch line more or less amounts to Lindsey and Frank telling each other how much they stink.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    It never gets tiring to watch the girls coast down the Manhattan streets, cocky and breezy and effortless, turning the heads of younger girls who gaze at them, starstruck. But it’s also featherlight, not meant to endure much longer than those brief airborne moments Camille and her friends live for.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    That’s what’s great about The Wife: Joe is no saint, and his philandering appears to be an open secret in the literary community, but it doesn’t mean Joan doesn’t love him. If she didn’t, none of this would be half as wrenching.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Condor is a ready-made star, and Centineo rises to meet her, the adoring, throaty lunk any introverted teen dreams of coming around and melting away her shyness. Theirs is a teenage romance I can believe in, despite its ridiculously convoluted circumstances.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    It is neither dumb nor smart enough to be fun, and spends way too much time with its boring human characters when it could be spending it with, you know, the giant shark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Luckily, Crazy Rich Asians is, at its heart, a fish-out-of-water story, and it has a lot more going for it than its literal money shots.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    The Darkest Minds is just too foggy to make out much of anything in.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    It is one of the more sadistic family films I have ever seen, a picture of the residents of a neglected childhood reckoning with the abandonment of their beloved, now grown-up human leader.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Cameron Post is the kind of film that openly courts falling into the cinematic limitations of an “issues film.” Akhavan’s sense of place and ensemble do a lot to counter that, but that specificity ends with the main character.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Like its protagonist, Puzzle finds itself as it goes along, and Agnes becomes a truly interesting person to root for.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    As it cliff dives, unprompted, into reheated cocaine-nightmare territory done better by any number of 1990s ’70s nostalgia films before it, it not only ceases to be fun, but stops pretending it has any vision for where its lead characters should go.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    In Dark Web, the threat is wholly of this world, which makes the sequel feel as though it comes from another universe entirely. It is scary, but it isn’t much fun.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    The film starts to feel like it’s more invested in selling the idea of the series rather than a film in and of itself.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Here We Go Again ties up these two wackadoo films’ hijinks in a very sincere bow. After all, Mamma Mia is a mom movie, in every way imaginable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Ultimately, Hotel Transylvania 3 is for very young children, and God love it for that.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    The problem isn’t Reiner taking dramatic liberties with the facts, it’s that his toolbox for doing so hasn’t changed since the mid-’90s.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    With a light touch but deep reserves of respect for fans both old and new Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda is an extremely fitting portrait of the influential composer. There’s an air of patience that presides over director Stephen Schible’s footage, even during a period that presents a lot of tumultuous questions for his seemingly unflappable subject.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    When Day of the Soldado truly wallows in violence, it does so exquisitely, with the kind of hopelessness that film violence, especially around this subject matter, should convey. But it also destabilizes any marketable attempts at heroism or character investment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    Tag
    The doubt about what is real and what isn’t has permeated so much of the film that when things take a turn for the serious in the final act, we the audience can’t even quite believe what we’re seeing, until the credits roll and you shrug to yourself, “Huh, I guess it was for real.” That’s a weirdly muted note to end such an otherwise over-the-top — conceptually and physically — comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Ultimately, in all its artifice and haphazard but enthusiastic invention, Hotel Artemis makes me a bit nostalgic for French ’90s genre fare of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro and, of course, Luc Besson, embracing their daffiness and dreaminess with an somewhat counterintuitive, almost naïve lack of vanity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Alex Strangelove is a little stylistically unambitious, nor is it terribly compelling as a romance — who Alex ends up with is ultimately beside the point.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    I left Ocean’s 8 more convinced than ever that no amount of fierce, fantastic female ensembles can overcome the mediocrity of a dull male director.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    The experience of watching it, especially given its dreamlike unreality and head-scratching punnery (this is a deeply unfunny movie) is like listening to a doddering old man for whom every story — about art, politics, local goings on — ends up being about how every woman is an evil witch that can’t be trusted.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Emily Yoshida
    Every scene adds another onion-skinlike layer, adding density and mass so slowly that you hardly notice the emotional weight of it all until it is suddenly overwhelming.

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