Emily Yoshida

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For 238 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Emily Yoshida's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Farewell
Lowest review score: 0 Daddy's Home 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 238
238 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Lane observes with both wryness and palpable admiration as groups across the country embrace the gothic pageantry of the Temple as a means of exercising their political freedom.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    Violet wants to sing. Does Violet want to be a pop star? This is posed as the the driving question of the film, but nothing about Fanning’s performance suggests a desire for much of anything.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    As many times as I tried to get onboard with its proposed brand of breezy fun, it kept kicking me off, if only because I found myself running up against the very foundation of its premise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Emily Yoshida
    The first time I saw Peterloo, it sent me out of the screening room onto Park Avenue with my blood boiling. Despite the oratory and the funny hats, Leigh’s ability to incite felt utterly contemporary and urgent.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    Its own pointlessness may keep The Dirt from feeling like an actual affront to humanity, but that doesn't make it very good, either.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    So here, in the year of our lord 2019, comes Five Feet Apart, and if it ends up being a late entry in the trend, it wouldn’t be a bad one to go out on.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Emily Yoshida
    What makes Booksmart land so delightfully is Wilde’s handle on exactly how seriously to take her neurotic heroines. ... Booksmart manages to be inclusive and progressive, without being precious about anything or sacrificing an ounce of humor. It feels at once like a huge moment for the teen movie genre, and also effortless, effortless enough to make one wonder what took so long.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    The film ... is more emotional than definitive; stopping just short of bestowing sainthood on the artist, but still aiming for something a little more cosmic than reportorial. This is not a “what really happened” exposé of his death, nor is it an academic postmortem on Peep’s musical or cultural legacy. It’s most effective as a character study.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Us
    It’s a messier film than Get Out, in that it never quite gets around to saying the things it’s trying to say. This is not entirely a bad thing; its messiness allows the film to spend more time working up inventive scares than conveying an all-caps complete-sentence message.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    Sword of Trust feints at being an Ideas movie, but really only wants to hang — which is certainly not a crime, but given the subject matter, and These Times, it’s a little disappointing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    The film remains too mannered for its own good; it’s unquestionably nice and well-intentioned, but lacking momentum.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Merchant is more brutally honest than most sports movies — or any kind of rising-star movie, for that matter — about failure, and it makes Fighting With My Family better than it needs to be. The entire cast is a pleasure, particularly the dynamo Pugh.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Emily Yoshida
    What Men Want is a wildly uneven stretch of a movie that’s more of a flail than a romp.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    The childlike, free-associative playfulness is now underscored by a palpable hunger to be the cleverest and coolest kids’ movie on the block, a hunger that weighs down Lord and Miller’s plenty-smart silliness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Emily Yoshida
    What makes Late Night — otherwise a largely predictable story in a familiar mold — really pop is Kaling’s script, which is at the blunter and frankly more exciting spectrum of what Kaling has proven herself to be capable of in her writing career thus far.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Emily Yoshida
    As an origin story for a young actor’s warped worldview, Honey Boy is compelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    As a psychological down-is-up horror movie, The Lodge has a few solid tricks up its sleeve. But when the smoke and mirrors clear, it’s ultimately a story about trauma, and a rather bleak one at that.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Emily Yoshida
    The little dramas and themes that emerge during the reunion of the film’s far-flung brood become, like a family, more than the sum of its individual parts, and an incredibly satisfying meal of a film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    If the narrative film only exists to give us the unsettling sliminess of Efron as Bundy, it won’t be a total waste. But it’s not much of a movie, either.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    The only reason any of this works at all is Salazar and, I hate to say it, those goddamned big eyes. They’re the windows to the soul, after all, and this ungainly, lurching cyborg of a would-be blockbuster has more of that than meets the eye.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    It’s clear between this and Nightcrawler that Gilroy and Gyllenhaal have some kind of gonzo chemistry. Even if Velvet Buzzsaw starts to sputter slightly after it’s made its point, it’s plenty exciting to witness the incredibly specific madness they whip up together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    The film builds to an anarchic set piece, in which a school full of rambunctious children defend the world from evil while the adults literally disappear off the face of the earth. It’s the closest thing Cornish comes to a real-life prescription for what ails us, and it goes down pretty well.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 0 Emily Yoshida
    If only the issue with Polar, Åkerlund’s fifth feature film, was merely shallowness. Polar is an execrable motion picture, a sad, lint-filled key bump scraped together from the bottom of the post-Tarantino ’90s exploitation baggie.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Emily Yoshida
    Replicas is chock-full of histrionic what-ifs that seem to hyperventilate so hard in their delivery that they don’t have enough oxygen to actually blow anyone’s mind. It would be the stuff of future cult screenings if it wasn’t so boring and muddled.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Emily Yoshida
    That more or less is The Upside in a nutshell. It’s a film that contains complicated, sad, interesting ideas rarely expressed on screen — even Kidman’s scold character unfolds into a more intriguing person, full of contradictions — but whose package is fundamentally unsuited to showcase those ideas, like a sweater with the holes in all the wrong places.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    American Hangman, a bar thought experiment turned into a film every bit as simple and bad-taste-leaving as that would imply, only has use for humans as sock puppets.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    Tight, fun little thriller.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Emily Yoshida
    This is too sunny a production to linger too long in the dark corners; even Laurel’s alcoholism is treated with a light touch when it comes up. Nevertheless, it still finds its way to some kind of profundity about the nature of long-term working relationships, something a little more complicated than the mere idea that the show must go on.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Emily Yoshida
    You don’t appreciate the art of a good genre contrivance until you see one pulled off poorly.

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