For 683 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Fear's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 A Man Escaped (1956)
Lowest review score: 10 Holmes & Watson
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 683
683 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Everything goes to hell in a decorative handbasket. What starts out as a simple plan will be destined to become, well, "A Simple Plan" redux.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    It’s the kind of film that works well if you don’t feel like getting off your couch. Zeke would definitely approve.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    The Hunt is neither a harbinger of Western civilization’s end nor quite the Swiftian satire its creators want it to be. It’s simply a better-than-decent B-movie, the kind that takes pride in its sick kills and throws a lot of punches that only occasionally connect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    There are some breathtakingly gorgeous images the movie throws at you — the townsfolk silently waving white handkerchiefs during a funeral — among the few giddily grotesque visuals that you can’t shake. (Pedro Sotero’s cinematography is as stunning as a painting and as psychotropic as the drugs the villagers take before the finale.)
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 David Fear
    How it informs so much of what the movie is getting at is something you’ll find yourself mulling over for weeks after you’ve left the theater. The feeling that you’ve just witnessed a major work from a great American filmmaker, however, is instantaneous.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    You might not pay money to see this in a theater, but you’d watch it on your couch in a second, which is why Netflix makes perfect sense for it. A coda sets up a sequel. There are worse things to look forward to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    To watch Sorry We Missed You is to realize that, despite its dedication to showing how people live and love and work (and work, and work, and work) in everyday Britain, this is a story that goes far beyond the United Kingdom.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    What The Whistlers lacks in terms of the rigor associated with its creator’s back catalog, it makes up for as a deadpan genre piece with a sly jab. It’s a serious work of pulp friction.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    You’re left to wonder whether you’ve watched a freshman college course with laughs, or a failed comedy with a lecture surgically grafted on to it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Make no mistake: This is really one man’s look back in anger, sorrow, joy and sentimentality. “Robbie Robertson on the Band” would be a more accurate description.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    Corpus Christi doesn’t skimp on the humanity; the film earns the slow smiles it brings to your face.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    If Untouchable does nothing else, it demonstrates how patterns of intimidation and the power to destroy lives flourish in systems that allow for the turning of blind eyes. It was just the cost of doing business with Harvey, until thankfully, it wasn’t.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    Whether you buy the ending or not is something between you and your own personal suspension-of-disbelief deity, but you can’t say that the star doesn’t commit to selling the character’s arc 100 percent. Insanity suits her.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    It’s a demonstration of directorial chops that somehow never devolves into a look-mamushka-no-hands display, and a textbook example of how to use handheld camerawork (courtesy of cinematographer Kseniya Sereda) and splashes of red, green, and goldenrod effectively without being garish or grandiloquent.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 David Fear
    Something vital definitely seems to have been lost in the translation, however, and what you’re left with is a retelling that feels deader than anything skulking around the shadows.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    The result isn’t exactly Lock, Stock Redux. Only the “stock” part remains.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    It is an innocuous, pleasant enough way to kill a few hours. That’s the worst thing you can say about it. It’s also, alas, the best thing you can say about it as well.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    Citizen K, Alex Gibney’s surprisingly strong documentary on the rise and fall and rebranding of Khodorkovsky, does a good job of charting the contours of this controversial figure’s story; that the filmmaker was able to get the subject himself to tell so much of it in his own words feels like a coup.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 David Fear
    To start as a genre resuscitation and end up as simply generic — that’s a far more fatal ending than any curse befalling the characters onscreen.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 David Fear
    OK, so, listen: There’s really no point describing what happens, or how, or when, or why. This is not a narrative film. This is not “cinema,” or maybe it is, who the f**k knows anymore? This is a Michael Bay movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Fear
    You could, however, accuse this Black Christmas of elevating the subtext of decades’ worth of slasher flicks to the point that the text itself starts to take a backseat, or that its third-act reveal may be trying a tad too hard to grab the social-thriller brass ring. You would not necessarily be wrong.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    For all of its curated channeling of past midnight-movie programming, In Fabric doesn’t feel like it’s cut from the same cloth as anything else. It’s a singular trip into a singularly warped mind.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Fear
    An actor with a handful of shorts under his belt — including a Cesar-nominated 2017 one that served as the basis for this feature — Ladj Ly juggles a variety of perspectives, subcultures and intersecting storylines like a pro.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Fear
    Varda by Agnès goes out not with a bang but a graceful farewell, as the director sits on a beach, a sandstorm whipping around her as vows to “disappear in the blur” and slowly fades from the image.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    It’s a quietly radical take on the art of finding one’s voice, playing out both in front of and behind the lens.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    Yes, it’s grim and gloomy — and like Lil Peep’s music, there’s also a sense of catharsis in all of this. More than anything, Jones and Silyan seem to be fashioning a postmortem that plays like his greatest hits, in which wounded wooziness somehow gives way to exhilaration and a warped sense of uplift.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Fear
    Atlantics pulls you into an experience. The empathy machine runs at full speed here. Ada, c’est moi.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 David Fear
    Yes, you would watch these two in virtually anything. You just wish it wasn’t this. They deserve something sturdier and far less head-slappingly preposterous, and that’s the truth.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    You may also feel so exhilarated watching an insanely creative voice in animation flex his storytelling muscles that you don’t realize the huge lump in your throat.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Fear
    It’s a documentary that starts as a nonfiction portrait and ends as a horror movie.

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