Daniel D'Addario

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For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Daniel D'Addario's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Veep: Season 6
Lowest review score: 10 Kids Say the Darndest Things (2019): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 266
266 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    There’s a reason that snake oil was successful long before Paltrow discovered it: Slick things are shiny too. “The Goop Lab” is only the latest iteration. ... Paltrow is a compelling host — not giving too much of herself away, ever stopping short of pure endorsement of any topic even as she gives it air — on what is a carefully structured, elegantly built, compulsively watchable show about, mainly, complete nonsense. No wonder she makes people so very mad.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    The show’s presentation of itself from title on as an autobiographical look at a star about whom we’re curious elides so much of what’s pertinent about her story as to feel, episode-to-episode, somewhat monotonous. Nora’s floating approach to life has manifold real charms. It also means that the show doesn’t have any momentum, or anywhere to go. It does have Awkwafina.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    “The Outsider” doesn’t rival “True Detective” for jolts or for insights about the human condition or the impulses that bring about crime. And its slow pace emphasizes the absence of what crime dramas can do so well. The stakes here seem to be massive; gradually, it becomes clear that an epidemic of darkness is overtaking many. But getting there, with so little in the way of character or freshness of tone, simply exhausts even an interested viewer.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    Unfortunately, Netflix’s “AJ and the Queen” has little to recommend it other than Ru himself, bringing to bear the star’s charisma on a tonally uneven, shaky story and trusting that glamour will carry the day. Even RuPaul has his limitations.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    Because Eva is such a bland character and Al-Massih is by the show’s design unknowable — yielding nothing over the show’s first half other than miracles we don’t know whether to take at face value — there’s vastly less here. Over the show’s first season, no viewer could be blamed for eventually giving up the faith.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    [The Golden Globes] felt more grown-up than usual in its 2020 outing. ... Its reputation, perhaps, was always a bit inflated on the basis of a few instances of ragged speeches and stars caught in the bathroom, but the ceremony had, historically, felt like a respite from the awards season’s particular gravity. Inasmuch as a show more professionally produced than ever before can be said to have been a victim, the Globes may be a victim of its own success.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    In all, “Katy Keene” represents a pleasant instance of the CW getting the balance exactly right for a comforting, engaging watch, keeping what works on “Riverdale” and ditching the murder. One hopes it stays that way.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    Malkovich’s John Brannox, later Pope John Paul III, is harder to read; his politics are less about power and dominance than a silkier sort of finesse. A viewer’s tolerance will vary, but it is striking to have a show that seems almost to demand a massive central performance suddenly defined by understatement, by refusal. What’s more, the statement the show makes about the Vatican seems more muddled than ever.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    Surely there has been a show more reliant on cliché than “Deputy,” Fox’s new cop drama. But none springs to mind. ... In short, “Deputy’s” politics may come from a past decade, but its writing seems to come from another century.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    The ambitions of “Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist” seem, in its early going, more focused on assembling that legitimately impressive playlist than in making it really sing. ... The development of her family story over the show’s first two hours suggest a drama with a growing awareness about the most interesting way to use its premise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    The Witcher also boasts richly expensive visuals and an expansive-seeming world, at least in its first five hours...What it lacks, though, is tonal consistency. This is a show with moments of drama and of gruesome violence cut through with a glancing humor that too often feels tossed-off and out-of-place in the world the show has created.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    More effort, in a way, seemed placed into making ABC’s current shows seem like library classics than in making either of ABC’s library shows presented in a live context thrive outside its own historical setting; it was left to the viewer to figure out for themself why “All in the Family” and “Good Times” were important. ... Plopping contemporary stars into old scripts and trusting it’ll move us feels like a cop-out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    It’s good news for those who turned “You” into a Netflix smash — and bad news for skeptics — that the show, in its second outing, is itself but more so.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    Pearce is undeniably good, but the script, with its aphoristic philosophy planted in the mouth of a character who’d historically been a fairly unintellectual money-hoarder, never allows him to compel us. And the visual vocabulary feels skittish and chaotic, presenting ghosts of Christmas past, present, and future that are unpleasant to look at and time jumps that can at times confuse. ... [Bob and Mary Cratchit are] written to truly despise Scrooge, and to want their time with him ended. Their performances sell it, but you’d join them and relate regardless.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    Aims at a clever pitch-darkness. It more often lands on a sort of congenital sourness, one that grows choking at the series’s hour-long episode lengths. It’s an unfortunate miss for series star Abigail Spencer, an appealing performer who deserves a showcase that presses her in service of fewer neonoir clichés.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    A show whose tone shifts chaotically should, at least, be interesting. Or it should be able to truly be about the things it’s about. ... [Poppy's] flaws — self-obsession, a righteous belief in her infallibility, inability to truly see others as anything besides characters in her story — become the show’s. ... A show that gets a lot very wrong.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    Even darker holiday movies end in a place where one is glad one spent the time with the family in question. At the end of time spent with the Moodys, one’s simply ready to leave.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    “Servant” is fascinating to look at and, at first, contemplate. But its slithering, reversing structure elides the fact that it must move the plot forward only infinitesimally each episode in order to conserve it, and that this is a shortish feature in the costume of a ten-episode drama. That’s its biggest, and least welcome, twist of all.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    Is it groundbreaking? No. But the story is solidly enough built to distract from certain annoying contrivances of sitcom-making that would be less present today, perhaps. Reiser and Hunt retain an amiable chemistry, and Hunt — too little seen in recent years — especially makes a compelling case for her continued stardom. She makes neuroses, then as now, seem less like a curse and more like a side effect of thoughtfulness.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    The whole project has a lot of embroidery — up to and including the spirit guide of sorts who leads Dennings’s Jules towards self-awareness, a cute cat who dispenses half-formed jokes in the voice of Beth Grant — but very little in the way of real insight. ... In all, its vision of friendship and its aesthetic of goofy quirk feels that worst thing for a would-be viral hit: Late.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    Often-jittery, ultimately charming concert special. ... The show thrived, in its live moments, when it embraced being proudly ersatz. ... The handmade, quirk-heavy tone of the production carried the day so heavily that at least one big star seemed out of place: Heavily anticipated and promoted within the broadcast, Queen Latifah, as Ursula, seemed to fall behind the beat and to generally lack the risky abandon of her part.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    It is at best a fairly lazy copy of more effective genre entertainments’ tone, with messy and underbaked story filling in the gaps.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    Three episodes in, the women of “The Morning Show” are islands even as co-anchors, and for no reason more compelling than that the plot has said so.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    It’s the show’s action and social commentary that falls short. The latter is represented in part by Angelica, too forcefully written by half, and in part by a burned-out-hellscape-as-social-scene metaphor that feels overdetermined. The show’s rules don’t really make sense: Most adults were vaporized, but some became zombies, and some were actually fine-ish. It was in flashbacks and in moments where Josh and Wesley were figuring out how to carry on that I saw the show “Daybreak” wants to be, one of fine and granular understanding of the roiling emotions of teen life filtered through the lens of popular art.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    To tackle the meanness and violence of history in a truly serious way — with superheroes or with mere magnificently brave mortals telling the story — demands a focus “Watchmen” simply lacks, and attempts to make up for with a tone of increasing dudgeon. What “Watchmen” sets out to do, taking the opportunity of an artwork perceived as unadaptable and writing a whole new story, is admirable. But both that original artwork and, more crucially, this story deserve better.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    The series arrives at a place of hope that will redeem it for many viewers, but its willingness to stagger towards that moment can be punishing. I can think of two full episodes I’d have excised from this show’s run, not merely because it feels and is too long and recursive but because the show has a tendency to want to say everything on its mind at once. And yet it remains curiously worth watching.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    Right now, “Treadstone” is a diverting series about an organization so diffuse that it’s easier understood as background noise between action. In the episodes and, perhaps, seasons to come, I’m hoping the show gives us more by paring back.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    Given the degree to which “Nancy Drew” attempts to coast by on sheer attitude, it should come as no surprise that the mystery is fundamentally uninteresting and that Nancy’s friends, in the show’s first two hours, are undistinguished. The show is less a series with characters and plot than an attempt at a haunted mood.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Daniel D'Addario
    Haddish, a competitive comedian, can’t help but mug over the kids she’s supposed to be introducing, and redirects the conversation perpetually to her celebrity status. ... This show wants the kids on its air to bolster and bring further attention to famous adult celebrities. In this, it gets the equation of how to bring together young people and stars precisely and disastrously backwards.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    Those grown-ups toggling around for a weekend binge who think “Dion” seems a bit young for them are almost certainly correct. But those families that spend time learning about Dion and his world will not be disappointed. Indeed, they’ll likely be ready for a second season even before the first ends. Dion’s powers include, for those at his age level and eager to explore their own abilities of empathy and curiosity, extreme watchability.

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