Carlos Aguilar

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For 109 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Carlos Aguilar's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Ruben Brandt, Collector
Lowest review score: 10 Overcomer
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 109
  2. Negative: 15 out of 109
109 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Formidable from a technical standpoint, The Platform thrives on effectively grotesque production design and ghastly special effects that shock and disgust with purpose.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Carlos Aguilar
    Sunsets, cellphone-lit melancholic music shows, and clichéd references to stars and constellations abound.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Carlos Aguilar
    A mediocre screenplay renders the movie far less thought-provoking than it could be. By-the-numbers jump scares, perplexing speeches and a glaring score further hurt its impact.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 85 Carlos Aguilar
    Fancifully heartfelt, Ride Your Wave doesn’t constitute his top effort, but it’s inviting enough to persuade audiences unfamiliar with him to dip their feet and then fully dive into the profundity of his imagination, where wonder awaits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Treading topical waters with an incisive flair, de Jong offers no didactic salvation or pessimistic prospects. Goldie’s sole assurance is to trudge one rocky step at a time, and that’s all any of us can do.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Carlos Aguilar
    Buoyant first-time actor, Levan Gelbakhiani goes from unknown to galvanizing star in a unique role. His presence is one of stunning physicality, proving there’s strength in what others see as a weakness in his character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Not even the most miniscule production design element is left to chance in such a tangible and meticulously conceived technique like stop-motion. Details matter, and comedy often emerges from them combined with great timing. “Farmageddon” is a non-verbal narrative that tells jokes directly to our curious eyes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Carlos Aguilar
    As it explores the intersection between the occult and mankind’s brutal cruelty in relation to women, The World Is Full of Secrets grips us with its minimalist, calibrated and cerebral scare tactics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Precisely written and deliberately shot, José, a Guatemala-set LGBTQ character examination from Chinese-born director Li Cheng, is a movie preoccupied with the private tragedy of unfulfilled impulses and aspirations as a result of widespread homophobia and emotional blackmail.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 95 Carlos Aguilar
    López Estrada and company not only subvert lazy assumptions about their misunderstood metropolis and who lives and thrives there, but they also entirely shift the focus to the unheard and unseen for a wonderful reinvention. You’ll never see L.A. the same again and that’s for the better.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Carlos Aguilar
    Minari beams with subtle wonder.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Carlos Aguilar
    Although Kajillionaire fails to fully engage in the same manner as July’s previous dramedies, it’s not entirely unsuccessful as it still compels us to see the people in front of us — not with rushed judgment, but with curiosity for the burdens or joys that have made them who they are. And it makes us chuckle while at it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 85 Carlos Aguilar
    Niche as some of the situations Arango poses are, his movie is the rare work of art that viscerally understands the immigrant experience but is cerebral enough not to oversimplify it, allowing it to appear messy and imperfect, and all the more truthful for it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Carlos Aguilar
    Decker is a superbly imaginative director, which leaves one wishing her creative powers had pushed the film even further away from the constraints of reality. But that’s a downside that comes with working from material written by another artist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Carlos Aguilar
    Mucho Mucho Amor is a tribute as inspired and jubilant as its majestic subject, a true original, who “used to be a star and now is a constellation.”
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Bolstered by an infectiously reckless joie de vivre and artfully handled hard-hitting truths, Cuties diffuses the impulse to dismiss it as just one more example of a trend.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Carlos Aguilar
    The filmmakers materialize a fascinating cinematic language that interrogates itself about matters of spontaneity and manipulation, man-made products and earth-given treasures, simplicity and sophistication, and how these all intersect.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Carlos Aguilar
    As unsatisfying as Spies in Disguise is because of its disregard for original design and the insufferable nods to disposable trends, its role as counterprogramming to toxic masculinity — turning ruthless spies into sensible beings with warmth as a moral compass — makes it ephemerally laudable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Carlos Aguilar
    What’s indelible in this visceral chronicle is that more than profiting from human suffering, the Ochoas fill the gaps of economic inequality while doing good without reservation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    As Colewell sinks in, it reveals itself as the cinematic equivalent of a deep exhale after having attained peace within.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    As irresistibly romantic as it is awe-inspiringly gorgeous, Weathering With You on the whole satisfies the craving for more of what “Your Name” ignited in viewers, yet with slightly less impact.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Carlos Aguilar
    Delgado Aparicio’s reflective direction with a patient eye for lived-in behavior and kinetic symbolism bears artistically ripe fruit in an affectingly measured, near-perfect tour de force that demands serious attention.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Carlos Aguilar
    Mann, an emerging Latino filmmaker, exhibits signs of vocation for the craft that could lead to a more fruitful product some day. For now, what he serves is a tortuous trick with a confusingly dark punch line for an ending.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Carlos Aguilar
    A poorly produced experiment by writer-director Dae Hoon Kim, also the act’s lead singer on- and offscreen, the film’s mere existence baffles.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Carlos Aguilar
    Precisely because of how ravishingly constructed some of the set pieces turned out, it’s more of shame to see the storytelling’s structural lack of cohesiveness and subplot saturation clutter the view.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Carlos Aguilar
    Calibrated with rare edge-of-your-seat pragmatism, Scott Z. Burns’ must-see procedural The Report diligently abides by the logical proposition that no end justifies premeditated immoral means as it scrutinizes how the CIA succumbed to post-9/11 paranoia and authorized sadistic abuses in the name of freedom.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Carlos Aguilar
    The codirectors, unconcerned with visual ornamentation, disseminate facts clearly in an undertaking that’s scholarly adept yet disappoints artistically.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Carlos Aguilar
    Corny to its core but with enough charisma to avert total insufferableness, it’s a bubbly counteraction of a movie boasting a progressive conclusion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 Carlos Aguilar
    As crushing as it is stirring, the gritty fable co-written for the screen by Clapin and Laurant (“Amélie,” “A Very Long Engagement”) finds an ideal visual medium in the filmmaker’s evocative animation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Carlos Aguilar
    Awfully bewildering till the end, a final bombshell catapults the persistently nonsensical plot onto a level of implausibility that defies basic logic and ethics.

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